Tangletalk

Tangletalk

by W. Nikola-Lisa, Jessica Clerk
     
 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
A Victorian setting, a typeface that resembles hand-lettering and a glimpse of a world that is more than a bit askew lend this diverting volume an Edward Gorey-esque aura-albeit an entirely insouciant one. Nikola-Lisa (Bein' with You This Way) turns logic on its head in funny and flippant rhymed couplets fueled by inherent contradictions and role reversals. " 'Twas in the month of Boston,/ In the wonderful city of May,/ The snow was raining wildly,/ The streets were dry and gay," opens the sing-song text, which throughout the volume is set within ribbon-like banners into Clerk's full-spread, fine-line pictures. The first-time illustrator parlays the poem's zany goings-on into uproarious scenarios, as the dapper narrator and his dutiful cat (sporting a maid's cap) encounter the highly unlikely, both in their townhouse and on the city's streets. Clerk depicts period dress and decor with a jolly flair and adds some winsome extras: tiny mice turn up in unexpected places and faces bloom on furniture, doors, building facades, kitchen utensils. Pulling off their tangled tale without a snag, this author and illustrator make perfect sense-almost.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A Victorian setting, a typeface that resembles hand-lettering and a glimpse of a world that is more than a bit askew lend this diverting volume an Edward Gorey-esque auraalbeit an entirely insouciant one. Nikola-Lisa (Bein' with You This Way) turns logic on its head in funny and flippant rhymed couplets fueled by inherent contradictions and role reversals. " 'Twas in the month of Boston,/ In the wonderful city of May,/ The snow was raining wildly,/ The streets were dry and gay," opens the sing-song text, which throughout the volume is set within ribbon-like banners into Clerk's full-spread, fine-line pictures. The first-time illustrator parlays the poem's zany goings-on into uproarious scenarios, as the dapper narrator and his dutiful cat (sporting a maid's cap) encounter the highly unlikely, both in their townhouse and on the city's streets. Clerk depicts period dress and decor with a jolly flair and adds some winsome extras: tiny mice turn up in unexpected places and faces bloom on furniture, doors, building facades, kitchen utensils. Pulling off their tangled tale without a snag, this author and illustrator make perfect sensealmost. Ages 4-7. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Alexandria LaFaye
Occurring in the wonderful city of May on a day when the snow was falling wildly, this whimsical book is filled with chairs that dash up chimneys, cats that simmer socks in pots, men who stroll in bed with shoes on their heads, and dishes that chase sinks. In a fun adventure with words, Nikola-Lisa tangles up every day events to create wonderfully absurd situations which are dramatized by Clerk's detailed and wacky illustrations.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2Inspired by verses from Peter and Iona Opie's The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren (Oxford Univ., 1959; o.p.), the author describes a day in Old Boston where everything is topsy-turvy. A top-hatted young man and his feline companion observe their upside-down world at home, in the city streets, and at the park. The book begins and ends with the phrase, "`Twas in the month of Boston,/In the wonderful city of May,/The snow was raining wildly,/The streets were dry and gay." In-between, readers discover a delightful barrage of rhyming nonsense verse highlighted by detailed double-page artwork. The meticulous watercolor and pen-and-ink drawings are flavored with intricate Victorian details. An enjoyable trip through a very strange day.Barbara McGinn, Oak Hill Elementary School, Severna Park, MD
Kirkus Reviews
An agreeably nonsensical, prettily illustrated tale in verse, where "the flowers were singing sweetly,/The birds were in full bloom." Tangletalk takes its inspiration from a Liverpool chant collected by the Opies in The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren (1959), and follows the venerable tradition of such delectable silliness as "Rain Makes Applesauce." No one and nothing does what is expected in this romp as the hero, attired in tails, vest, and pocketwatch, finds nannies in the birdbath, police officers hiding acorns while squirrels are on parade, and socks simmering in a pot while lunch is hung out to dry. The clear pastel illustrations give the tale a Victorian setting and include a truly improbable number of cats. A pleasant diversion.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525453994
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/01/1997
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.24(w) x 11.64(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

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