Tao of Fertility: A Healing Chinese Medicine Program to Prepare Body, Mind, and Spirit for New Life

( 7 )

Overview

An esteemed doctor who has helped countless women achieve their dream of having a child offers his program for enhancing fertility through traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Dr. Daoshing Ni, descended from more than 70 generations of Taoist masters, has achieved renown among high-tech infertility specialists, TCM practitioners, and his many devoted patients. The Tao of Fertility is the first book combining a practical plan for conceiving using TCM with empowering Taoist principles that can carry you through ...

See more details below
Paperback
$12.69
BN.com price
(Save 20%)$15.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (46) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $3.99   
  • Used (36) from $1.99   
Tao of Fertility: A Healing Chinese Medicine Program to Prepare Body, Mind, and Spirit for New Life

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

An esteemed doctor who has helped countless women achieve their dream of having a child offers his program for enhancing fertility through traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Dr. Daoshing Ni, descended from more than 70 generations of Taoist masters, has achieved renown among high-tech infertility specialists, TCM practitioners, and his many devoted patients. The Tao of Fertility is the first book combining a practical plan for conceiving using TCM with empowering Taoist principles that can carry you through pregnancy, childbirth, and beyond. Structured according to a woman’s journey to conception, The Tao of Fertility includes:

  • A questionnaire assessing fertility potential
  • A 28-day fertility enhancement program
  • Simple meditations and acupressure points to improve reproductive circulation and relaxation
  • Guidelines for mapping your fertility using Chinese methods of diagnosis
  • Information on how herbs and acupuncture can increase fertility
  • Eating plans for pregnancy, postpartum, and while breast-feeding.
  • and much more
Enriched by moving stories of women who became pregnant using TCM, this is a compassionate, comprehensive handbook.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Deepak Chopra
"I highly recommend this book to both laypersons and health care providers."
Jordan M. Phillips
"Dr. Daoshing Ni has given these ancient methods to the modern world."
Richard P. Marrs
"This is a must-read for all couples approaching this sometimes long, fatiguing journey to a ‘New Life’."
Judith Orloff
". . .important, informative. . . Dr. Dao is a trusted, wise teacher. Learn from him!"
Mary Lou Ballweg
". . .calming, sensitive, knowledgeable, and inspiring. . . .a great introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine."
—Deepak Chopra
“I highly recommend this book to both laypersons and health care providers.”
—Jordan M. Phillips
“Dr. Daoshing Ni has given these ancient methods to the modern world.”
—Richard P. Marrs
“This is a must-read for all couples approaching this sometimes long, fatiguing journey to a ‘New Life’.”
—Judith Orloff
“. . .important, informative. . . Dr. Dao is a trusted, wise teacher. Learn from him!”
—Mary Lou Ballweg
“. . .calming, sensitive, knowledgeable, and inspiring. . . .a great introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine.”
--Deepak Chopra
“I highly recommend this book to both laypersons and health care providers.”
--Jordan M. Phillips
“Dr. Daoshing Ni has given these ancient methods to the modern world.”
--Richard P. Marrs
“This is a must-read for all couples approaching this sometimes long, fatiguing journey to a ‘New Life’.”
--Judith Orloff
“. . .important, informative. . . Dr. Dao is a trusted, wise teacher. Learn from him!”
--Mary Lou Ballweg
“. . .calming, sensitive, knowledgeable, and inspiring. . . .a great introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061137853
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/8/2008
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 939,878
  • Product dimensions: 7.37 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Daoshing Ni, D.O.M, L.Ac., Ph.D., is a noted doctor of Oriental medicine and a licensed acupuncturist. Cofounder of the Tao of Wellness, Inc., he lives in Los Angeles.

Dana Herko has written for both television and film. She lives in Los Angeles with her family.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

The Tao of Fertility
A Healing Chinese Medicine Program to Prepare Body, Mind, and Spirit for New Life

Chapter One

Finding Your Footing

Enjoy good health.
Weaken your ambitions.
Strengthen your essence.
—from The Complete Works of Lao Tzu,
translation and elucidation by Hua-Ching Ni

After thousands and thousands of years in exile, the Monkey King finally gets a break. Buddha summons him and tells him to get ready, for a long journey awaits him. A monk has been appointed to bring back the sacred scriptures. He will have to travel all the way from China to India and then back again, with the Monkey King as his escort.

Fortunately, the journey you are about to embark on is not quite as long, at least not when measured in miles. But the challenges you face trying to get pregnant can be every bit as daunting. You need to prepare yourself for whatever lies ahead. How can you do this when you might not even know what you are facing? You do it by making sure you are physically, emotionally, and spiritually strong before taking even a single step.

In traditional Chinese medicine, the mind, the body, and the spirit are one. You do not live your life in a vacuum. Nor do you stand still—you are in motion every second, every minute, every day of your life. Imagine a clock with the pendulum swinging. But while the pendulum is moving, so is the clock, trying to find balance in motion. Now think of your body. When you are stressed, overworked, emotional . . . guess what happens? You leave yourself vulnerable to outside forces likeviruses, germs, and bacteria. Sickness, by definition, is the imbalance of yin and yang, or interopposing and intersupporting forces.

You are a complete and complex individual with a unique constitution. What establishes being in balance for you is entirely different than balance for someone else. Our circumstances, our surroundings, our genetics all leave an imprint on us. In traditional Chinese medicine, there are no absolutes. Everything is relative. There's no such thing as perfect health. But there is better health. And better health means better fertility. You hold the power to attain it.

You could say that my family has been at this for a long time. I come from almost seventy-six generations of Taoists. Taoism is a lineage, in the same way Judaism and many other spiritual traditions are. But it's less a religion than a way of life. It is based on embracing nature and understanding the world. It teaches you to care about improving yourself. Most importantly, it teaches you to always embrace nature rather than damage it. In a way, it's not that different from what Henry David Thoreau, in Walden Pond, believed: that you must preserve nature at all costs. We believe this because the answers to life's questions lie in nature.

In order to try and understand the philosophical underpinnings of balance—of health and sickness, of life and death—Taoists focus on five major areas of study. A child growing up as I did in the Taoist tradition chooses early on which of these paths to walk. There's astrology, as in fortune-telling, which teaches how constellations and human energies affect out lives. I Ching is another form of fortune-telling, but one based on randomness. It teaches how to handle and manage changes in our lives. Another path is feng shui, the study of how the placement of objects affects our energy and how our physical environment can be conducive to our life force. There's martial arts, which teaches how to find inspiration and knowledge in the observation of animal movement in nature—a knowledge that can then be used to strengthen our body and increase our understanding of the relationships among people. And finally, there is healing.

I was predestined to be a healer. I started on this path when I was just a little boy. But I did not start with the study of medicine or healing, because for Taoists, the five paths are just extensions of life itself. My father and mother taught me first and above all how to be a good person. That is the Taoist way. We started with an understanding of the good and the bad in the universe, and learned how life worked. My brother—who is also a healer—and I learned to sweep floors, to help out, to understand the importance of family and the social unit. We also learned the importance of cultivating yourself and taking personal responsibility. Many people hear the word responsibility and think of some heavy burden. But as a child, my responsibility was to play hard and study hard, and to appreciate the life I was given. That's all I was asked to do.

Yet even as I went about my everyday life of playing and doing simple chores, I was learning profound lessons. Take a little thing like sweeping the floor. Looking back, I see that sweeping was so much more than cleaning. It was the way I swept the floor: the patterns I created, the way I felt when I was doing the task. Every day, there was a different energy to my sweeping. Some days, I felt impatient. Other days, I felt so good that I did a little extra work. And on those days when I felt particularly happy, I could see things I wouldn't have noticed otherwise, like the dust particles on the hardwood floor and the way they danced in the light.

By the time I was in elementary school, I started learning tai chi chuan and chi gong, two Taoist forms of meditative exercise that require contemplative thinking and silence. At the time, I didn't understand this silence and why the people were standing like statues. But slowly I could see the value of this kind of quiet time and the lessons you could learn from it. It taught me how to be calm. That was the real beginning of becoming a healer. I was learning the Taoist ways that would prepare me to go on and learn the practice of Chinese medicine.

The Tao of Fertility
A Healing Chinese Medicine Program to Prepare Body, Mind, and Spirit for New Life
. Copyright © by Daoshing Ni. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments     ix
Prologue     xi
Introduction     xvii
The Journey Begins: Preparing Mind, Body, and Spirit
Finding Your Footing     3
The Power of Herbs     33
Acupuncture-Restoring Harmony     44
Exercise-The Key to Balance     52
Examining Your Readiness to Have a Child     69
On the Path
The Twenty-Eight-Day Fertility Program     85
Signs in Chinese Medicine     106
Diagnosis in Western Medicine     113
Your Fertility Map     122
Detours and Obstacles     136
Infertility Challenges
Ovulation     145
Pelvic and Tubal     152
Uterine     158
Cervical     166
Autoimmune     176
Miscarriage     183
Constitutional     193
Unexplained     199
Male     206
A New Beginning
Pregnant at Last     213
Motherhood and Beyond     220
When Dreams Don't Come True     227
In Balance for the Rest of Your Life     234
Appendix
Recipes     239
Patient Fertility Questionnaire     245
Basal Temperature Chart     250
Resources     251
Glossary     261
Index     269

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

The Tao of Fertility
A Healing Chinese Medicine Program to Prepare Body, Mind, and Spirit for New Life

Chapter One

Finding Your Footing

Enjoy good health.
Weaken your ambitions.
Strengthen your essence.
—from The Complete Works of Lao Tzu,
translation and elucidation by Hua-Ching Ni

After thousands and thousands of years in exile, the Monkey King finally gets a break. Buddha summons him and tells him to get ready, for a long journey awaits him. A monk has been appointed to bring back the sacred scriptures. He will have to travel all the way from China to India and then back again, with the Monkey King as his escort.

Fortunately, the journey you are about to embark on is not quite as long, at least not when measured in miles. But the challenges you face trying to get pregnant can be every bit as daunting. You need to prepare yourself for whatever lies ahead. How can you do this when you might not even know what you are facing? You do it by making sure you are physically, emotionally, and spiritually strong before taking even a single step.

In traditional Chinese medicine, the mind, the body, and the spirit are one. You do not live your life in a vacuum. Nor do you stand still—you are in motion every second, every minute, every day of your life. Imagine a clock with the pendulum swinging. But while the pendulum is moving, so is the clock, trying to find balance in motion. Now think of your body. When you are stressed, overworked, emotional . . . guess what happens? You leave yourself vulnerable to outside forces likeviruses, germs, and bacteria. Sickness, by definition, is the imbalance of yin and yang, or interopposing and intersupporting forces.

You are a complete and complex individual with a unique constitution. What establishes being in balance for you is entirely different than balance for someone else. Our circumstances, our surroundings, our genetics all leave an imprint on us. In traditional Chinese medicine, there are no absolutes. Everything is relative. There's no such thing as perfect health. But there is better health. And better health means better fertility. You hold the power to attain it.

You could say that my family has been at this for a long time. I come from almost seventy-six generations of Taoists. Taoism is a lineage, in the same way Judaism and many other spiritual traditions are. But it's less a religion than a way of life. It is based on embracing nature and understanding the world. It teaches you to care about improving yourself. Most importantly, it teaches you to always embrace nature rather than damage it. In a way, it's not that different from what Henry David Thoreau, in Walden Pond, believed: that you must preserve nature at all costs. We believe this because the answers to life's questions lie in nature.

In order to try and understand the philosophical underpinnings of balance—of health and sickness, of life and death—Taoists focus on five major areas of study. A child growing up as I did in the Taoist tradition chooses early on which of these paths to walk. There's astrology, as in fortune-telling, which teaches how constellations and human energies affect out lives. I Ching is another form of fortune-telling, but one based on randomness. It teaches how to handle and manage changes in our lives. Another path is feng shui, the study of how the placement of objects affects our energy and how our physical environment can be conducive to our life force. There's martial arts, which teaches how to find inspiration and knowledge in the observation of animal movement in nature—a knowledge that can then be used to strengthen our body and increase our understanding of the relationships among people. And finally, there is healing.

I was predestined to be a healer. I started on this path when I was just a little boy. But I did not start with the study of medicine or healing, because for Taoists, the five paths are just extensions of life itself. My father and mother taught me first and above all how to be a good person. That is the Taoist way. We started with an understanding of the good and the bad in the universe, and learned how life worked. My brother—who is also a healer—and I learned to sweep floors, to help out, to understand the importance of family and the social unit. We also learned the importance of cultivating yourself and taking personal responsibility. Many people hear the word responsibility and think of some heavy burden. But as a child, my responsibility was to play hard and study hard, and to appreciate the life I was given. That's all I was asked to do.

Yet even as I went about my everyday life of playing and doing simple chores, I was learning profound lessons. Take a little thing like sweeping the floor. Looking back, I see that sweeping was so much more than cleaning. It was the way I swept the floor: the patterns I created, the way I felt when I was doing the task. Every day, there was a different energy to my sweeping. Some days, I felt impatient. Other days, I felt so good that I did a little extra work. And on those days when I felt particularly happy, I could see things I wouldn't have noticed otherwise, like the dust particles on the hardwood floor and the way they danced in the light.

By the time I was in elementary school, I started learning tai chi chuan and chi gong, two Taoist forms of meditative exercise that require contemplative thinking and silence. At the time, I didn't understand this silence and why the people were standing like statues. But slowly I could see the value of this kind of quiet time and the lessons you could learn from it. It taught me how to be calm. That was the real beginning of becoming a healer. I was learning the Taoist ways that would prepare me to go on and learn the practice of Chinese medicine.

The Tao of Fertility
A Healing Chinese Medicine Program to Prepare Body, Mind, and Spirit for New Life
. Copyright © by Daoshing Ni. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2014

    Great book

    Very informative read

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    Tao of Fertility

    I felt that this book was a helpful guide for me. As the new year has passed without me being pregnant I found myself looking for a common sense way to correct it. This book is filled with things that should be common sense but we tend to loose sight of in out fast pace lives. I would recommend it to anyone.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2008

    An Oustanding Source Of Information

    After I was diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-three, my oncologist suggested that I go to see a fertility specialist. This being that my ovaries were affected by the chemotherapy and my chances of conceiving would be drastically lowered. The fertility specialist immediately recommended many types of drugs, needles and having IVF and then an FET 'Frozen Embryo Transfer'. I was devastated to say the least. Few doctor's have mastered how to handle this delicate problem that plagues women today. Dr. Dao is one of them. He doesn't shy away, as if it only exists in the minds of the women facing it, instead he leads the way to hope and promise of fertility. p p This book is a blessing! It speaks volumes with both knowledge and information that is easily readable and understood. Dr. Dao, Being a Taoist with their full understanding of balance, mind, body, and nature, many of these concepts were new to me and I was pleased to find that all the information given seemed logical, easy to follow and most importantly, achievable! An important aspect to women searching through the seemingly endless amount of information on this subject. p p From the diets to detoxify to the daily meditation to relax the mind, there is something for everyone struggling with fertility in this book. Included are recipes, suggestions for herbal supplements, questionnaires, and charts that are easy to follow and bring hope to those trying to increase the likelihood of getting pregnant! This is an astonishing turn around in fertility books. I've read many books on this very subject and most jump into the available drug treatments, IVF, and surgical solutions used to help women with this problem. p p This book includes more than the usual doctor's message of eating a sensible diet, not smoking, exercising and staying positive. Dr. Dao discusses Traditional Chinese Medicine with an equal scale toward Western Medicine. He never says one is better than the other and helps you to understand the way of the Tao and the Traditional Chinese Methods. This is the first book of this type where I've actually had the doctor prepare your body for pregnancy in both body and mind. p p The second half of this book was beautifully done with touching vignettes of previously infertile women who now have conceived and have happy, healthy children. I find these stories not only touching, but helpful in coping with my own infertility. Hope is the first word that comes to mind. p p A massive amount of information is placed in this single volume book. It's not just a self-help guide to women and couples, but an outstanding source of information that I will turn to time and time again. p

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)