Tao of Jeet Kune Do: New Expanded Edition

Tao of Jeet Kune Do: New Expanded Edition

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by Bruce Lee
     
 

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Compiled from Bruce Lee’s notes and essays and originally published in 1975, this iconic volume is one of the seminal martial arts guides of its time. The science and philosophy behind the fighting system Lee pioneered himself—jeet kune do—is explained in detail, depicted through hundreds of Lee’s own illustrations. With the collaboration of

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Overview

Compiled from Bruce Lee’s notes and essays and originally published in 1975, this iconic volume is one of the seminal martial arts guides of its time. The science and philosophy behind the fighting system Lee pioneered himself—jeet kune do—is explained in detail, depicted through hundreds of Lee’s own illustrations. With the collaboration of Lee’s daughter, Shannon, and Bruce Lee Enterprises, this new edition is expanded, updated, and remastered, covering topics such as Zen and enlightenment, kicking, striking, grappling, and footwork. Featuring an introduction by Linda Lee, this is essential reading for any practitioner, offering a brief glimpse into the mind of one of the world’s greatest martial artists.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897502023
Publisher:
Black Belt Communications
Publication date:
11/01/2011
Edition description:
Expanded edition
Pages:
250
Sales rank:
37,498
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.80(d)

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TAO of Jeet Kune Do: Expanded Edition


By Bruce Lee, Kris Storti, Sarah Dzida, Atina Hartunian, Jeannine Santiago

Black Belt Books

Copyright © 2011 Bruce Lee Enterprises LLC
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-89750-263-4



CHAPTER 1

EMPTY YOUR MIND


ON ZEN

To obtain enlightenment in martial art means the extinction of everything which obscures the "true knowledge," the "real life." At the same time, it implies boundless expansion and, indeed, emphasis should fall not on the cultivation of the particular department which merges into the totality but rather on the totality that enters and unites that particular department.


* * *

The way to transcend karma lies in the proper use of the mind and the will. The oneness of all life is a truth that can be fully realized only when false notions of a separate self, whose destiny can be considered apart from the whole, are forever annihilated.


* * *

Voidness is that which stands right in the middle between this and that. The void is all-inclusive, having no opposite — there is nothing which it excludes or opposes. It is living void because all forms come out of it and whoever realizes the void is filled with life and power and the love of all beings.


* * *

Turn into a doll made of wood: it has no ego, it thinks nothing, it is not grasping or sticky. Let the body and limbs work themselves out in accordance with the discipline they have undergone.


* * *

If nothing within you stays rigid, outward things will disclose themselves. Moving, be like water. Still, be like a mirror. Respond like an echo.


* * *

Nothingness cannot be defined; the softest thing cannot be snapped.


* * *

I'm moving and not moving at all. I'm like the moon underneath the waves that ever go on rolling and rocking. It is not, "I am doing this," but rather, an inner realization that "this is happening through me," or "it is doing this for me." The consciousness of self is the greatest hindrance to the proper execution of all physical action.


* * *

The localization of the mind means it's freezing. When it ceases to flow freely as it is needed, it is no more the mind in its suchness.


* * *

The "Immovable" is the concentration of energy at a given focus, as at the axis of a wheel, instead of dispersal in scattered activities.


* * *

The point is the doing of them rather than the accomplishments. There is no actor but the action; there is no experiencer but the experience.


* * *

To see a thing uncolored by one's own personal preferences and desires is to see it in its own pristine simplicity.


* * *

Art reaches its greatest peak when devoid of self-consciousness. Freedom discovers man the moment he loses concern over what impression he is making or about to make.


* * *

The perfect way is only difficult for those who pick and choose. Do not like, do not dislike; all will then be clear. Make a hairbreadth difference and heaven and earth are set apart; if you want the truth to stand clear before you, never be for or against. The struggle between "for" and "against" is the mind's worst disease.


* * *

Wisdom does not consist of trying to wrest the good from the evil but in learning to "ride" them as a cork adapts itself to the crests and troughs of the waves.


* * *

Let yourself go with the disease, be with it, keep company with it — this is the way to be rid of it.


* * *

An assertion is Zen only when it is itself an act and does not refer to anything that is asserted in it.


* * *

In Buddhism, there is no place for using effort. Just be ordinary and nothing special. Eat your food, move your bowels, pass water and, when you're tired, go and lie down. The ignorant will laugh at me, but the wise will understand.


* * *

Establish nothing in regard to oneself. Pass quickly like the non-existent and be quiet as purity. Those who gain, lose. Do not precede others, always follow them.


* * *

Do not run away; let go. Do not seek, for it will come when least expected.


* * *

Give up thinking as though not giving it up. Observe techniques as though not observing.


* * *

There is no fixed teaching. All I can provide is an appropriate medicine for a particular ailment.


* * *

Buddhism's Eight-Fold Path

The eight requirements to eliminate suffering by correcting false values and giving true knowledge of life's meaning have been summed up as follows:

1. Right views (understanding): You must see clearly what is wrong.

2. Right purpose (aspiration): Decide to be cured.

3. Right speech: Speak so as to aim at being cured.

4. Right conduct: You must act.

5. Right vocation: Your livelihood must not conflict with your therapy.

6. Right effort: The therapy must go forward at the "staying speed," the critical velocity that can be sustained.

7. Right awareness (mind control): You must feel it and think about it incessantly.

8. Right concentration (meditation): Learn how to contemplate with the deep mind.


ART OF SOUL

The aim of art is to project an inner vision into the world, to state in aesthetic creation the deepest psychic and personal experiences of a human being. It is to enable those experiences to be intelligible and generally recognized within the total framework of an ideal world.


* * *

Art reveals itself in psychic understanding of the inner essence of things and gives form to the relation of man with nothing, with the nature of the absolute.


* * *

Art is an expression of life and transcends both time and space. We must employ our own souls through art to give a new form and a new meaning to nature or the world.


* * *

An artist's expression is his soul made apparent, his schooling, as well as his "cool" being exhibited. Behind every motion, the music of his soul is made visible. Otherwise, his motion is empty and empty motion is like an empty word — no meaning.


* * *

Eliminate "not clear" thinking and function from your root.


* * *

Art is never decoration, embellishment; instead, it is work of enlightenment. Art, in other words, is a technique for acquiring liberty.


* * *

Art calls for complete mastery of techniques, developed by reflection within the soul.


* * *

"Artless art" is the artistic process within the artist; its meaning is "art of the soul." All the various moves of all the tools means a step on the way to the absolute aesthetic world of the soul.


* * *

Creation in art is the psychic unfolding of the personality, which is rooted in the nothing. Its effect is a deepening of the personal dimension of the soul.


* * *

The artless art is the art of the soul at peace, like moonlight mirrored in a deep lake. The ultimate aim of the artist is to use his daily activity to become a past master of life, and so lay hold of the art of living. Masters in all branches of art must first be masters of living, for the soul creates everything.


* * *

All vague notions must fall before a pupil can call himself a master.


* * *

Art is the way to the absolute and to the essence of human life. The aim of art is not the one-sided promotion of spirit, soul and senses, but the opening of all human capacities — thought, feeling, will — to the life rhythm of the world of nature. So will the voiceless voice be heard and the self be brought into harmony with it.


* * *

Artistic skill, therefore, does not mean artistic perfection. It remains rather a continuing medium or reflection of some step-in psychic development, the perfection of which is not to be found in shape and form, but must radiate from the human soul.


* * *

The artistic activity does not lie in art itself as such. It penetrates into a deeper world in which all art forms (of things inwardly experienced) flow together, and in which the harmony of soul and cosmos in the nothing has its outcome in reality.


* * *

It is the artistic process, therefore, that is reality and reality is truth.


* * *

The Path to Truth(Not to be fragmented, but to see the totality — Krishnamurti)

1. Seeking after truth

2. Awareness of truth (and its existence)

3. Perception of truth (its substance and direction — like the perception of movement)

4. Understanding of truth

5. Experiencing of truth

6. Mastering of truth

7. Forgetting truth

8. Forgetting the carrier of truth

9. Return to the primal source where truth has its roots

10. Repose in the nothing


JEET KUNE DO

For security, the unlimited living is turned into something dead, a chosen pattern that limits. To understand Jeet Kune Do, one ought to throw away all ideals, patterns, styles; in fact, he should throw away even the concepts of what is or isn't ideal in Jeet Kune Do. Can you look at a situation without naming it? Naming it, making it a word, causes fear.


* * *

It is indeed difficult to see the situation simply — our minds are very complex — and it is easy to teach one to be skillful, but it is difficult to teach him his own attitude.


* * *

Jeet Kune Do favors formlessness so that it can assume all forms and since Jeet Kune Do has no style, it can fit in with all styles. As a result, Jeet Kune Do utilizes all ways and is bound by none and, likewise, uses any techniques or means which serve its end.


* * *

Approach Jeet Kune Do with the idea of mastering the will. Forget about winning and losing; forget about pride and pain. Let your opponent graze your skin and you smash into his flesh; let him smash into your flesh and you fracture his bones; let him fracture your bones and you take his life! Do not be concerned with your escaping safely — lay your life before him!


* * *

The great mistake is to anticipate the outcome of the engagement; you ought not to be thinking of whether it ends in victory or in defeat. Let nature take its course, and your tools will strike at the right moment.


* * *

Jeet Kune Do teaches us not to look backward once the course is decided upon. It treats life and death indifferently.


* * *

Jeet Kune Do avoids the superficial, penetrates the complex, goes to the heart of the problem and pinpoints the key factors.


* * *

Jeet Kune Do does not beat around the bush. It does not take winding detours. It follows a straight line to the objective. Simplicity is the shortest distance between two points.


* * *

The art of Jeet Kune Do is simply to simplify. It is being oneself; it is reality in its "isness." Thus, isness is the meaning — having freedom in its primary sense, not limited by attachments, confinements, partialization, complexities.


* * *

Jeet Kune Do is the enlightenment. It is a way of life, a movement toward willpower and control, though it ought to be enlightened by intuition.


* * *

While being trained, the student is to be active and dynamic in every way. But in actual combat, his mind must be calm and not at all disturbed. He must feel as if nothing critical is happening. When he advances, his steps should be light and secure, his eyes not fixed and glaring insanely at the enemy. His behavior should not be in any way different from his everyday behavior, no change taking place in his expression, nothing betraying the fact that he is engaged in mortal combat.


* * *

The tools, your natural weapons, have a double purpose:

1. To destroy the opponent in front of you — annihilation of things that stand in the way of peace, justice and humanity.

2. To destroy your own impulses caused by the instincts of self-preservation. To destroy anything bothering your mind. Not to hurt anyone, but to overcome your own greed, anger and folly. Jeet Kune Do is directed toward oneself.

Punches and kicks are tools to kill the ego. The tools represent the force of intuitive or instinctive directness which, unlike the intellect or the complicated ego, does not divide itself, blocking its own freedom. The tools move onward without looking back or to the side.


* * *

Because of the pure-heartedness and empty-mindedness inherent in man, his tools partake of these qualities and play their role with the utmost degree of freedom. The tools stand as symbols of the invisible spirit, keeping the mind, body and limbs in full activity.


* * *

Absence of stereotyped technique as the substance means to be total and free. All lines and movements are the function.

Non-attachment as the foundation is man's original nature. In its ordinary process, thought moves forward without halting; past, present and future thoughts continue as an unbroken stream.


* * *

Absence of thought as the doctrine means not to be carried away by thought in the process of thought, not to be defiled by external objects — to be in thought yet devoid of thought.


* * *

True thusness is the substance of thought and thought is the function of true thusness. To think of thusness, to define it in thought, is to defile it.


* * *

Bring the mind into sharp focus and make it alert so that it can immediately intuit truth, which is everywhere. The mind must be emancipated from old habits, prejudices, restrictive thought processes and even ordinary thought itself.


* * *

Scratch away all the dirt your being has accumulated and reveal reality in its isness, or in its suchness, or in its nakedness, which corresponds to the Buddhist concept of emptiness.


* * *

Empty your cup so that it may be filled; become devoid to gain totality.


ORGANIZED DESPAIR

In the long history of martial arts, the instinct to follow and imitate seems to be inherent in most martial artists, instructors and students alike. This is partly due to human tendency and partly because of the steep traditions behind multiple patterns of styles. Consequently, to find a refreshing, original, master teacher is a rarity. The need for a "pointer of the way" echoes.


* * *

Each man belongs to a style which claims to possess truth to the exclusion of all other styles. These styles become institutes with their explanations of the "Way," dissecting and isolating the harmony of firmness and gentleness, establishing rhythmic forms as the particular state of their techniques.


* * *

Instead of facing combat in its suchness, then, most systems of martial art accumulate a "fancy mess" that distorts and cramps their practitioners and distracts them from the actual reality of combat, which is simple and direct. Instead of going immediately to the heart of things, flowery forms (organized despair) and artificial techniques are ritualistically practiced to simulate actual combat. Thus, instead of "being" in combat, these practitioners are "doing" something "about" combat.


* * *

Worse still, super mental power and spiritual this and spiritual that are desperately incorporated until these practitioners drift further and further into mystery and abstraction. All such things are futile attempts to arrest and fix the ever-changing movements in combat and to dissect and analyze them like a corpse.


* * *

When you get down to it, real combat is not fixed and is very much "alive." The fancy mess (a form of paralysis) solidifies and conditions what was once fluid, and when you look at it realistically, it is nothing but a blind devotion to the systematic uselessness of practicing routines or stunts that lead nowhere.


* * *

When real feeling occurs, such as anger or fear, can the stylist express himself with the classical method, or is he merely listening to his own screams and yells? Is he a living, expressive human being or merely a patternized mechanical robot? Is he an entity, capable of flowing with external circumstances, or is he resisting with his set of chosen patterns? Is his chosen pattern forming a screen between him and the opponent and preventing a "total" and "fresh" relationship?


* * *

Stylists, instead of looking directly into the fact, cling to forms (theories) and go on entangling themselves further and further, finally putting themselves into an inextricable snare.


* * *

They do not see it in its suchness because their indoctrination is crooked and twisted. Discipline must conform to the nature of things in their suchness.


* * *

Maturity does not mean to become a captive of conceptualization. It is the realization of what lies in our innermost selves.


* * *

When there is freedom from mechanical conditioning, there is simplicity. Life is a relationship to the whole.


* * *

The man who is clear and simple does not choose. What is, is. Action based on an idea is obviously the action of choice and such action is not liberating. On the contrary, it creates further resistance, further conflict. Assume pliable awareness.


* * *

Relationship is understanding. It is a process of self-revelation. Relationship is the mirror in which you discover yourself — to be is to be related.


* * *

Set patterns, incapable of adaptability, of pliability, only offer a better cage. Truth is outside of all patterns.


* * *

Forms are vain repetitions which offer an orderly and beautiful escape from self-knowledge with an alive opponent.


* * *

Accumulation is self-enclosing resistance and flowery techniques strengthen the resistance.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from TAO of Jeet Kune Do: Expanded Edition by Bruce Lee, Kris Storti, Sarah Dzida, Atina Hartunian, Jeannine Santiago. Copyright © 2011 Bruce Lee Enterprises LLC. Excerpted by permission of Black Belt Books.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

Bruce Lee was an iconic figure in martial arts who pioneered the concept of jeet kune do from his physical training, personal research, and formal education in philosophy at the University of Washington–Seattle. He acted in several motion pictures, including The Big Boss, Enter the Dragon, Fists of Fury, and Way of the Dragon. He is the author of Bruce Lee: Wisdom for the Way, Chinese Gung Fu: The Philosophical Art of Self-Defense, and the Fighting Method series.

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Tao of Jeet Kune Do 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 48 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My sifu always said that Bruce Lee was to martial arts what Albert Einstein was to physics. Bruce was truly a revolutionary and this book outlines his philosophy, techniques, and his brilliant analysis of martial arts. This is not a how-to book, because in Jeet Kune Do, there are no katas, forms, etc. You use what works and don't use what doesn't. Bruce's words are brilliant as they come off the page and open your mind to concepts you never thought of before. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Tao of Jeet Kune Do is A great great piece of history (his-story)get it! Bruce lee's story.Well you have to experience it for your self because this book is not just A form of fighting, do you remember the great film ENTER THE DRAGON? like Bruce said in his own words I study the art of fighting with out fighting and what that means in my own words is you can fight just as hard or harder with your mental mind rather than your physical body.Bruce Lee was trying to deliver us as human beings A clear message that the life that we live as individuals,rather you be black,chinnese,white or even hispanic,we are like catapillers in A cacoon just waiting to blossom into butterflies to be free from the life we use to live regardless if you were rich or poor, famous or infamous.But to have A real meaning of your spirituality is the real gift of life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been reading and practicing Jeet Kune Do for a little over five years and this book is one of the reasons why. This was the first book I read involving JKD and it inspired me to read all I could about the subject. It is a well put together book containing drawings to illustrate various points, philosophies and concepts surrounding JKD and its application. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in either Jeet Kune Do or Bruce Lee.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Volumes could be written on the information contained in this book. Bruce Lee was surely a martial artist whose concepts were far ahead of his time. He irritated the traditionalists of his day, and yet, his ideas are well accepted in the 21st century, as most martial arts schools now cross train in other styles and arts not related to their original personal training. Mr. Lee expressed the idea that a true martial artist will train, read, sleep, think, and devote his/her entire life to the study of martial arts. Many readers can study this book and yet miss the minute details that Bruce relied upon as everyday fact. For example he said ¿a person reacts to a quick motion toward his eyes instinctively blinking. Such instinctive blinking must be controlled in practice or else the opponent, if aware that the fighter closes his eyes when threatened, may provoke this reaction and utilize the moment of blindness for a hit or kick.¿ Two sentences out hundreds presented in this book, and yet, a complete course can be built around it, (frontal, side, surprise, angry attacks, etc). Many new students want to show their speed of technique in a short time frame but, Bruce stated ¿high levels of perceptual speed are the product of learning, not of inheritance.¿ Mr. Lee presents to the reader a fact that occurs when stress or anger interferes with your self-defense. ¿Over all tension and unnecessary muscular contractions act as brakes reducing speed and dissipating energy.¿ What angered Bruce Lee¿s distracters the most was his philosophy that the true martial artists are not confined by rules, tradition, or fighting methods. He believed that the best art was no art, that one must just flow and let the attack and defense be one and the same. A story was told to me that one day Bruce Lee and Edmund Parker, the Father of American Kenpo, were having a discussion on this very matter. Mr. Parker told Bruce that he agreed in many parts of his concepts but, a student needs to be grounded in a good solid martial arts system and master the basics before that student can explore ideas on his own. He also reminded Bruce that he had a solid base in Wing Chun style and trained under the Great Yip Man before expressing his own methods. Read this book carefully and let Mr. Lee¿s ideas enhance your personal style of martial art, not replace it. All styles and arts have value to them, and no matter how long we train and study, we can always learn something from them that will add substance to our personal development.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a former student of Lee's art of Jeet Kune Do and co-author of 'Attack Proof: The Ultimate Guide to Personal Protection', I have a tremendous appreciation for the earthquake The Tao of Jeet Kune Do created in the martial arts community. In contrast to many present day martial artists, Lee didn't regard his own skills as a monolithic, immutable religion that never needed to change. He had the true humility to keep evolving his art, improving it without fear of discarding what had become useless--whether classical or not. The 'Tao' is a fascinating look at a bold and curious mind at work. What rigid classicists fail to realize when they refuse to evolve ever (because their style is 'carved in stone'), is that even in their own art, somebody at somepoint had to CREATE it, either from some new combination of older styles or out of nothing.
The_Illusionist More than 1 year ago
Well I have to say that the publishers once again did a very fine job on updating another and perhaps the definitive work by the late Bruce Lee. However, unlike their update of Bruce Lee's Fighting Method: The Complete Edition, this edition is not in hardback, but in trade paperback. Not that it is necessarily a bad thing, but it would have been nice to see it in hardback. Now you are probably asking yourself, "Do I really need to spend the money purchasing an updated and expanded edition since I already have the original?" And for that I would have to definitely say YES, and don't wait BUY IT NOW! Now I am not going to go into a review of the contents of this book as that has been done quite thoroughly in the reviews of the original version. Instead I am going to point out the reasons why you should own this updated and expanded edition. And here are the reasons why: 1. The organization and layout of the material, although almost identical to the original, is much better and more clearly defined. 2. The illustrations are much clearer and larger than the original version 3. The added commentaries by Linda Lee Caldwell and Bruce's daughter Shannon, as well as, a number of noted martial artists are quite interesting and add insight to Bruce's work. 4. If you look at an original version and this one, you can see material that has been added throughout. 5. The translations from Chinese to English is much more accurate. I highly recommend this updated and expanded edition along with Bruce Lee's Fighting Method: The Complete Edition and the following two books by Teri Tom, who is a devoted practitioner of Jeet Kune Do and very, very intelligent which can clearly be seen in her two books. The Straight Lead: The Core of Bruce Lee's Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do Jeet Kune Do: The Arsenal of Self-Expression Martial Arts Nutrition: A Precision Guide to Fueling Your Fighting Edge Shawn Kovacich Martial Artist/Krav Maga Instructor Author of the Achieving Kicking Excellence book and DVD series.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hello everyone my name is MX. I think that this is a concise book on Jeet Kune Do--for one thing, it was written by its creater, Bruce (Jun Fan) Lee. I feel that this book has a wide array of technical background on implimenting your techniques in an efficiant and explosive manner. It also has quite a few detailed and straight forward statements on the state of martial arts and philosophical background that would make Socretes think. This book covers technical backgrounds on nerve manipulations to execute your techniques without thinking about it--also without warning to any potential assailants. The philosophical background teaches--sorry--GUIDES you to personal freedom of expression and how NOT to jump the bandwagon as do many classical martial artists commonly do--freedom of expression is hard to do, but when achieved, you become true to yourself and your quality of life becomes clear. I hope this 'In-A-Nutshell' has helped anyone out there reading my review of this marvelous text. With all due respect to any classical martial artists out there, I do not wish to offend any of you, but I feel it is neccessary to point out that freedom of expression will help out all of you in all aspects in life. Thank-you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you have ever seen an interview with Bruce Lee or have Read any of his quotes he emphesizes a great deal on the state of mind and flexibility one should have in a fight, rather than technique. He says the simple moves when performed rightly are the most effective ones, a straight punch, swift kick to the shin,head butt he says when people start to get carried away with combinations and grappling they get their lights knocked out. He teaches street fighting not competitve, he says if the groin is exposed attack it, If you have to gauge his eyes, gauge them, there are no rules. He says be like water, if your rnemy has a club he relies on that club for every strike, you have all the weapons you need to take him on, knuckles, elbows, knees feet, he says the weapon they are usng, the size, if they look tyrained in fighting or not will all depend on the shape you should make to encounter them, he says be like water, water can form into the shape of whatever its put into, adjust everything you are going to do bsed n your opponant. Water can flow, it can move to advantage based on your enemies moves, or it can crash, you take a hit and fall into confusion. Bruce Lee says your mindset sahould be seriously playfull in a fight, serious as in you could get hurt, playful as in you are not overwealmed by fear or anger. He says clear your mind and let yourself react to your opponant, do not try to make him do this or that trying to determin the outcome, he says you can always loose no matter what, but for the best chance of winning, you should playfully see what you opponant relies on, what moves. This was the most interesting technique he taught me, he said you should feint one or two times (a fast pretend strike where you quickly fake a punch or kick then withdraw to a neutral stance), only rarely three before every attack, this will make him block or try to counter your pretend strike and he will thus give an opening, this is when you attack. When he expects a feint, feint twice. he says one should never attack without feinting. He shows diagrams as to what to do if you are grappling, choaks, locks, submissions ect. Most of all he wants you to rid your mind of emotion before every engagement, circle around your enemy, feint and see how they try to attack you, feel them out, make them look bad, get into their mind, make them loose control of emotion. Bruce Lees technique is turning physical fighting into a mind game.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Zookario More than 1 year ago
Remember, take what you need and understand from the tao and let the other stuff slip by.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am maaking this so people can learn to defend themselfs. I have a black belt. First off my name is bookhead. (Not my real name, duh) everyone can put in a tip or a trick. When making one lable it "defence club" here is a tip: stand straight with right foot behind you left in frount. Hands straght up to the celling one father out and tited a bit the other closer to your body and not tilted. :)
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GEFL More than 1 year ago
I have the original "Tao..." This expanded edition keeps the flavor of the original while adding new explanatory information and English translations of the Chinese characters. Very Nice!
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