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Tao of Language: How to Handle Infinity by Playing the Wonderful Bead Games
     

Tao of Language: How to Handle Infinity by Playing the Wonderful Bead Games

by Valo Motalygo
 
Motalygo says this book burst out of him like a tornado. He'd been fascinated for some time with a bead game, a distant echo of Hermann Hesse’s book The Glass Bead Game, and tried several times to explain his enthusiasm for the game to his sister, with little success. He decided to write her a letter, a primer of sorts where he could compose a few coherent

Overview

Motalygo says this book burst out of him like a tornado. He'd been fascinated for some time with a bead game, a distant echo of Hermann Hesse’s book The Glass Bead Game, and tried several times to explain his enthusiasm for the game to his sister, with little success. He decided to write her a letter, a primer of sorts where he could compose a few coherent notes to explain the concept of the bead game. This 135-page book is the result.

A talented writer, Motalygo invented his own unique polyphonic form of narration. Motalygo's narrator is an intellectual, a polyglot, a stand-up comedian, a mathematician, a linguist, a programmer, a poet, an interpreter, a kitchen worker and a teacher, and the imagined voices of many other characters chime in throughout the book: a friend, a passerby, his mother, his daughter, his nieces, the reader(s), an astounded actuary, a condescending woman, someone who is sick and tired, a misogynist, people at a party, etc. This chorus of differing opinions, belly-laughter funny, is a very sensitive tool, providing a reaction to the story while it is being told. Voices filled with irony or admiration, ridicule or condescension and every emotion in between create a multilayered structure for a sturdy edifice of content.

The book is a collection of abound 100 short stories, or "babbles," as the author calls them. The stories are reflections on eternal topics that have forever fascinated the human race--love, truth, beauty, values and the drama, comedy and tragedy of life--all related in a light tone. While the tone of the narrative--the author calls it "blabbering"--is light and bubbly, whimsical and chatty, the content is deep, pithy and substantial. Eternal topics are expressed in a contemporary idiom and evoke tears through laughter and laughter through tears. The result is a unique, hilariously entertaining and very profound book.

A dozen poems by the author are appended to the book as well as an essay about Motalygo’s poetry by writer Asya Pekurovskaya.

Editorial Reviews

Jeremy Katz
I don't have the foggiest idea what this book is about, but writing is adorable.
Jerome Kroth, Ph.D.
The book Tao of Language is deeply philosophical and hilariously funny.
A condescending Woman
This book proves that men too can have multiple orgasms. Well done, Valo.
An Astounded Actuary
From the deepest mysteries of human relationships and the world around us, to sex and then to trite jokes and obscenities! Astounding!
Someone who is sick and tired
The book is utterly annoying. After a couple of good laughs, I became tired of the
constant teasing. Can’t he do something else besides ‘blabbering'?
He should learn how to speak in plain English.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013943605
Publisher:
Genotype
Publication date:
02/15/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Valo (Vladimir) Motalygo was born, raised and educated in the former Soviet Union. Later he moved to the United States with his wife and daughter Sasha. Before he wrote his book Tao of Language, he worked as a software engineer, a teacher, a kitchen worker and an interpreter for the State Department. While a mathematics student at Moscow University in Russia, he got interested in finding a set of postulates to guide him through life. The book Tao of Language is a condensation of Motalygo’s astute, often hilarious, observations about life in the former Soviet Union and the United States.

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