Tao Te Ching

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Overview

The Tao Te Ching is a great treasure house of wisdom. Written by Lao Tzu as early as the sixth century B.C. and composed of only 5,000 characters, it has become one of the classic works of spiritual enlightenment. The Tao offers a much-needed alternative to our fragmented, modern ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving. To live life in accordance with "Tao" is to be in harmony with others, with the environment, and with oneself.

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Tao Te Ching (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Overview

The Tao Te Ching is a great treasure house of wisdom. Written by Lao Tzu as early as the sixth century B.C. and composed of only 5,000 characters, it has become one of the classic works of spiritual enlightenment. The Tao offers a much-needed alternative to our fragmented, modern ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving. To live life in accordance with "Tao" is to be in harmony with others, with the environment, and with oneself.

In this evocative and poetic new translation, Ralph Alan Dale has captured the beauty and essence of a unique masterpiece. He translates "Tao" as "the Great Integrity," signifying the return to holism, creativity, and honesty. Following his translation of the complete text, Dale provides insightful commentary on each verse, reprinting the verse on the same page with the commentary. The book is also a magnificent work of art: the elegant Chinese calligraphy and stunning photographs, printed in black and silver, enhance the poetry and stimulate the reader's imagination.

It has been 2,500 years since the Tao Te Ching was written. Yet living generations and those soon to come may be particularly attuned to Lao Tzu's words and their message. In Dale's translation, the Tao Te Ching resonates to our twenty-first century hopes, dreams, and challenges-as though Lao Tzu had written this remarkable book just for us.

Ralph Alan Dale has been practicing, teaching, researching, and writing on acupuncture for thirty years, and has published numerous books on Chinese medicine. He lives in Florida and North Carolina with his wife, Hendrina Ophey.

John Cleare is an internationally renowned photographer, specializing in landscapes and mountains.

The most accessible and authoritative English translation of the ancient Chinese classic. Offers the essence of each word and makes Lao Tzu's teaching alive.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Dale, a teacher of alternative medicine and author of Acupuncture with Your Fingers, offers a new translation of the ancient Chinese text credited by legend to the sixth-century sage Lao Tzu. Relying on several earlier translations from Chinese, Dale lovingly renders the 81 sections into verse rather than prose. Accompanied by Cleare's evocative black-and-white nature photographs, each poem is titled and stands alone. Included are Dale's informed commentaries for each verse that present the meaning of Lao Tzu's words for life today. For example Verse 30, "Defense and Aggression," is interpreted as permitting defense against violence, but never taking revenge or attempting to conquer others through the use of nuclear, chemical or biological weapons. One meaning of Verse 49, "Wisdom," is that each human, no matter how compromised and corrupted, has an innate humanity in his or her core. Dale uses the last verse, "The Paradoxes of Life," to summarize the meanings in the first 80. He contends that despite the evil uses that technology has been put to, such as the development of weapons of mass destruction, it is possible to transform this technological knowledge into a mutually dependent system of economy and communications that may be used to meet the needs of people worldwide. This transformation is a way for the modern world to live within Lao Tzu's Great Integrity, a life of harmony with one another. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
It is not often that books of merit in the field of spiritual writing also appeal to the eye and the hand. This version of the well-known Tao Te Ching is indubitably a coffee-table book, but it is as gratifying to the intellect as to the sense of aesthetics. In the principal section of the book, each verse chapter, in Chinese and in Dale's translation, is accompanied by a beautifully subtle black-and-white photograph. At the rear of the book, Dale, a longtime scholar of acupuncture and other fields, repeats each verse chapter and adds his own commentary. There is something unintentionally comic about Dale's Western, reasoned, and multisyllabic commentaries on Lao Tzu's studied simplicity, apparent even in translation; still, most readers will find Dale's insights helpful. For libraries with significant holdings in Taoism. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Based on contemporaneous texts discovered by archeologists in China in the last 20 years, this new translation of the Te-tao Ching is very readable and enjoyable yet at the same time meticulously researched and accurate. It has a clear introduction, extensive commentary, and complete notes. A library wanting complete holdings on Chinese philosophy should surely consider this first of a five-volume series on Chinese classics that will appear in the next years. Otherwise, it will suffice to have translations of Lao-Tzu, the Tao (The Way), and/or the Tao-Te Ching by some or all of its past translators, including Stephen Mitchell, Wing-Tsit Chan, H.B. Crill, Witter Byner, Feng and English, Arthur Waley, Lin Yutang, and James Legge.-- Kitty Chen Dean, Nassau Coll., Garden City, N.Y.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781597771207
  • Publisher: Phoenix Books, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/28/2007
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Edition number: 2
  • Product dimensions: 5.76 (w) x 4.66 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Meet the Author

ABOUT THE TRANSLATORS

GIA-FU FENG was born in 1919 in Suzhou. He grew up in Shanghai and during World War II graduated from Peking University. He came to the United States in 1947 and earned a Master’s Degree at the Wharton School. Meeting Alan Watts in San Francisco and studying at the American Academy of Asian Studies, he found the path he had been seeking. He taught at Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California and founded Stillpoint Foundation, a Taoist community in Colorado where he lived until his death in 1985.
 
JANE ENGLISH was born in Boston. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College and received her doctorate in experimental high energy particle physics from the University of Wisconsin. Her other books and calendars include Different Doorway: Adventures of a Caesarean Born, Fingers Pointing to the Moon, and the IceWisdom Calendar. She lives in Vermont. Her current work may be seen at www.eheart.com.
 
TOINETTE LIPPE worked at Alfred A. Knopf for more than thirty years. In 1989, she founded the Bell Tower imprint. Her own books include Nothing Left Over: A Plain and Simple Life and Caught in the Act: Reflections on Being, Knowing, and Doing. She now devotes herself to East Asian brush painting and her paintings and cards can be seen at www.toinettelippe.com.
 
JACOB NEEDLEMAN is professor emeritus of philosophy at San Francisco State University. Among his books are Lost Christianity, The American Soul,  and What Is God?. In addition to his teaching and writing, he serves as a consultant in the fields of psychology, education, medical ethics, and philanthropy, and he was featured on Bill Moyers’ acclaimed PBS series, “A World of Ideas.”  www.jacobneedleman.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Tao Te Ching (pronounced, more or less, Dow Deh Jing) can be translated as The Book of the Immanence of the Way or The Book of the Way and of How It Manifests Itself in the World or, simply, The Book of the Way. Since it is already well known by its Chinese title, I have let that stand.

About Lao-tzu, its author, there is practically nothing to be said. He may have been an older contemporary of Confucius (551-479 B.C.E.) and may have held the position of archive-keeper in one of the petty kingdoms of the time. But all the information that has come down to us is highly suspect. Even the meaning of his name is uncertain (the most likely interpretations: "the Old Master" or, more picturesquely, "the Old Boy"). Like an Iroquois woodsman, he left no traces. All he left us is his book: the classic manual on the art of living, written in style of gemlike lucidity, radiant with humor and grace and largeheartedness and deep wisdom: one of the wonders of the world.

People usually think of Lao-tzu as a hermit, a dropout from society, dwelling serenely in some mountain hut, unvisited except perhaps by the occasional traveler arriving from a '60s joke to ask, "What is the meaning of life?" But it's clear from his teachings that he deeply cared about society, if society means the welfare of one's fellow human beings; his book is, among other things, a treatise on the art of government, whether of a country or of a child. The misperception may arise from his insistence on wei wu wei, literally "doing not-doing," which has been seen as passivity. Nothing could be further from the truth.

A good athlete can enter a state of body-awareness inwhich the right stroke or the right movement happens by itself, effortlessly, without any interference of the conscious will. This is a paradigm for non-action: the purest and most effective form of action. The game plays the game; the poem writes the poem; we can't tell the dancer from the dance.

Less and less do you need to force things,
until finally you arrive at non-action.
When nothing is done,
nothing is left undone.


Nothing is done because the doer has wholeheartedly vanished into the deed; the fuel has been completely transformed into flame. This "nothing" is, in fact, everything. It happens when we trust the intelligence of the universe in the same way that an athlete or a dancer trusts the superior intelligence of the body. Hence Lao-tzu's emphasis on softness. Softness means the opposite of rigidity, and is synonymous with suppleness, adaptability, endurance. Anyone who has seen a t'ai chi or aikido master doing not-doing will know how powerful this softness is.

Lao-tzu's central figure is a man or woman whose life is in perfect harmony with the way things are. This is not an idea; it is a reality; I have seen it. The Master has mastered Nature; not in the sense of conquering it, but of becoming it. In surrendering to the Tao, in giving up all concepts, judgments, and desires, her mind has grown naturally compassionate. She finds deep in her own experience the central truths of the art of living, which are paradoxical only on the surface: that the more truly solitary we are, the more compassionate we can be; the more we let go of what we love, the more present our love becomes; the clearer our insight into what is beyond good and evil, the more we can embody the good. Until finally she is able to say, in all humility, "I am the Tao, the Truth, the Life."

The teaching of the Tao Te Ching is moral in the deepest sense. Unencumbered by any concept of sin, the Master doesn't see evil as a force to resist, but simply as an opaqueness, a state of self-absorption which is in disharmony with the universal process, so that, as with a dirty window, the light can't shine through. This freedom from moral categories allows him his great compassion for the wicked and the selfish.

Thus the Master is available to all people
and doesn't reject anyone.
He is ready to use all situations
and doesn't waste anything.
This is called embodying the light.


What is a good man but a bad man's teacher?
What is a bad man but a good man's job?
If you don't understand this, you will get lost,
however intelligent you are.
It is the great secret.



The reader will notice that in the many passages where Lao-tzu describes the Master, I have used the pronoun "she" at least as often as "he." The Chinese language doesn't make this kind of distinction; in English we have to choose. But since we are all, potentially, the Master (since the Master is, essentially, us), I felt it would be untrue to present a male archetype, as other versions have, ironically, done. Ironically, because of all the great world religions the teaching of Lao-tzu is by far the most female. Of course, you should feel free, throughout the book, to substitute "he" for "she" or vice versa.

As to method: I worked from Paul Carus's literal version, which provides English equivalents (often very quaint ones) alongside each of the Chinese ideograms. I also consulted dozens of translations into English, German, and French. But the most essential preparation for my work was a fourteen-year-long course of Zen training, which brought me face to face with Lao-tzu and his true disciples and heirs, the early Chinese Zen Masters.

With great poetry, the freest translation is sometimes the most faithful. "We must try its effect as an English poem," Dr. Johnson said; "that is the way to judge of the merit of a translation." I have often been fairly literal -- or as literal as one can be with such a subtle, kaleidoscopic book as the Tao Te Ching. But I have also paraphrased, expanded, contracted, interpreted, worked with the text, played with it, until it became embodied in a language that felt genuine to me. If I haven't always translated Lao-tzu's words, my intention has always been to translate his mind.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
Tao Te Ching - Translation 13
Verbatim Translation 95
Notes on the Verbatim Translation 256
Commentary on Verse I 271
Definitions, Concordance, and Wade-Pinyin Conversion 295
List of Radicals 337
Appendix Some of the Earliest English Translations of Verse One 341
Sources 345
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 136 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(66)

4 Star

(36)

3 Star

(21)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 138 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2006

    Not the best translation

    I was very disappointed after bringing this book home. Not only does the author provide you with a pre-packaged understandings and assumptions ripe for today's 'spiritualist' culture, but the translation itself is troublesome. It is clear that this author's own interpretation of the 'tao' comes ringing all too clear through the translation. Moreover, I found the change of pronouns to 'she' and 'her' as suspect, suggesting to me that other non-PC aspects of this work might also be edited out. Just give me the translation as acurately as possible. I rated this 'disappointing' though not a complete loss.

    19 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2005

    The Perfect Book that can be reviewed is not the Perfect Book!

    This was the first time I ever studied the classic of philosophy, the 'Tao Te Ching.' The notes by Yi-Ping Ong are exceedingly helpful, especially considering that I am a silly Westerner that is positively ignorant about Chinese history and culture. Her introduction was also extremely enlightening and allowed even a novice to grasp the major principles of Lao Tzu's philosophy. The translation by Charles Muller was easy to understand (but I cannot compare it to other translations). An excellent book and a truly wondrous philosophy! I wish I could give it an infinite number of stars! To paraphrase the Master: the perfect book that can be reviewed is not the perfect book! This book is simply TOO good for a mere five stars!!!

    12 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2008

    Very Insightful

    I truly believe that this is a suberb source of wisdom on the Tao. It is such an interesting method of thinking and can be applied quite easily to any other religous background. I enjoyed reading it and sharing in the words of Lao Tzu. To compare with other translations, I thought that this one was rather well done. It is indeed worth reading.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2006

    Recommended

    A great book on wisdom from the Tao. Even though the true author of this book is unknown (and even if its more than one person who wrote it) it still provides useful solutions to some of our spiritual and ethical problems.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2000

    Good for coffee table

    Good spiritual poetry and pleasing photography

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2014

    A Recommended Edition

    Although the introduction to this edition of the Tao Te Ching is not accurate, I highly recommend this ancient text to all seeking a higher understanding and approach to experiencing life itself.

    Known as an integral part of understanding Tao (or, 'the way') its purpose is well served through a series of odd paradoxes and other thought exercises. These are designed to impart a sense of higher wisdom and humaneness.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Very organized and Words are compelling. Tend to make you become a better person. Shows you the ways of life and why certain things are the way they are. Makes the reader calm and focused thinking about what had read. creative sentences.

    This book is mostly cultural. not so modern to think of. but its content are amazing. for example: "...he who knows himself is wise..." this is in fact a relevant sentence. the book contains many more principles of life, and tend to give encouragement to these who feel weak because of the way people's moral are in today's world. very educational. its just like a book of proverbs. Fiknd your way in life, but don't forget to think of others.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    It is the most faithful and satisfying translation for me, a Chinese

    I am a Chinese. I like Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching or Tao Te Sutra very much. I searched and read many English translations, but I was always not very satisfied with their translations comparing the original Chinese meanings. After I read this book, I think it is the most faithful and satisfying English version. The translator understood Lao Tzu completely and never gave excess transcendental meanings. I am wondering who is translator of this book, why there is no introduction and the biography of the translator'? I really appreciate if who can tell me the translator with his biography.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2012

    To you peoole

    You are wrong. Just stop. Major issues

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2012

    Good, but will need to read it again

    This is a veru interesting book, but a reread (or three) may be needed to fully understand it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 21, 2010

    An elite work worthy of separate billing from other translations

    As one reads multiple English translations of Tao Te Ching, it becomes apparent how extremely difficult it must be to capture the essence of such a profound and yet beautiful Chinese linguistic treasure. Star has done a superb job of preserving literal accuracy in his text, as evidenced, if one were to doubt, by the copious translational notes. However, he has done more that simply translate literally, and he has also avoided the oft-adopted imposition a poetic imperative to this work.

    Star seems to understand and preserve the simple directness of the philosophic message, without paring away important context and thematic imagery at the most critical junctures. Without being tedious, the translation is thorough and poignant, and without being artsy, it is intellectually rhythmic and resonant.

    Most notably, Star emphasizes the universally accessible wisdom of the Tao Te Ching while skillfully diffusing the mystic and esoteric entanglements that often seem to arise in other translations. In short, he makes Tao most comprehensible to the reader without losing its essential depth and clarity. I would highly recommend this translation to anyone from the curious casual reader to the advanced intent scholar.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Pure wisdom

    This book is really great. Made me think about a lot of things that I really hadn't considered before. I would recommend this book to anyone who feels a little confused about their life, and anyone who just wants to better themselves.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2009

    Standard translation-god standard translation with good Art

    This is a standard late 19th century translation by James Legge. The text is easy to read but the Artwork sets it apart. The reproductions are of good quality with the frequent guttering of images being the only complaint; this is the one thing that always flaws an otherwise excellent book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2007

    great wisdom

    I think a lot more people should read this book because it helps people see clearer. Young people should really read this not as a required book but as a book that can help them into their journey into adulthood.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2014

    200-300

    &#200&#201&#202&#203&#204&#205&#206&#207&#208&#209&#210&#211&#212&#213&#214&#215&#216&#217&#218&#219&#220&#221&#222&#223&#224&#225&#226&#227&#228&#229&#230&#231&#232&#233&#234&&#235&#236&#237&#238&#239&#240&#241&#242&#243&#244&#245&#246&#247&#248&#249&#250&#251&#252&#253&#254&#255&#256&#257&#258&#259&#260&#261&#262&#263&#264&#265&#266&#267&#268&#269&#270&#271&#272&#273&#274&#275&#276&#277&#278&#279&#280&#281&#282&#283&#284&#285&#286&#287&#288&#289&#290&#291&#292&#293&#294&#295&#296&#297&#298&#299&#300

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2014

    100-200

    &#100&#101&#102&#103&#104&#105&#106&#107&#108&#109&#110&#111&#112&#113&#114&#115&#116&#117&#118&#119&#120&#121&#122&#123&#124&#125&#126&#127&#128&#129&#130&#131&#132&#133&#134&#135&#136&#137&#138&#139&#140&#141&#142&#143&#144&#145&#146&#147&#148&#149&#150&#151&#152&#153&#154&#155&#156&#157&#158&#159&#160&#161&#162&#163&#164&#165&#166&#167&#168&#169&#170&#171&#172&#173&#174&#175&#176&#177&#178&#179&#180&#181&#182&#183&#184&#185&#186&#187&#188&#189&#190&#191&#192&#193&#194&#195&#196&#197&#198&#199&#200

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2013

    Good

    Good

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    Hummmm

    Walks away. Beautiful

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Ok.....

    I was going to use this as a demigod camp, but........ nevermind

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2012

    Daniel

    He thr.usts into her harder, his dik hitting her g-spot. He starts kissing her and groping her huge b.oobs, his dik growing inside of her

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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