Tap Dancing to Work: Warren Buffett on Practically Everything, 1966-2012: A Fortune Magazine Book

Tap Dancing to Work: Warren Buffett on Practically Everything, 1966-2012: A Fortune Magazine Book

4.6 25
by Carol J. Loomis
     
 

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Warren Buffett built Berkshire Hathaway into something remarkable— and Fortune journalist Carol Loomis had a front-row seat for it all.

When Carol Loomis first mentioned a little-known Omaha hedge fund manager in a 1966 Fortune article, she didn’t dream that Warren Buffett would one day be considered the world’s greatest

Overview

Warren Buffett built Berkshire Hathaway into something remarkable— and Fortune journalist Carol Loomis had a front-row seat for it all.

When Carol Loomis first mentioned a little-known Omaha hedge fund manager in a 1966 Fortune article, she didn’t dream that Warren Buffett would one day be considered the world’s greatest investor—nor that she and Buffett would quickly become close personal friends. As Buf­fett’s fortune and reputation grew over time, Loomis used her unique insight into Buffett’s thinking to chronicle his work for Fortune, writ­ing and proposing scores of stories that tracked his many accomplishments—and also his occa­sional mistakes.

Now Loomis has collected and updated the best Buffett articles Fortune published between 1966 and 2012, including thirteen cover stories and a dozen pieces authored by Buffett himself. Loomis has provided commentary about each major arti­cle that supplies context and her own informed point of view. Readers will gain fresh insights into Buffett’s investment strategies and his thinking on management, philanthropy, public policy, and even parenting. Some of the highlights include:

  • The 1966 A. W. Jones story in which Fortune first mentioned Buffett.
  • The first piece Buffett wrote for the magazine, 1977’s “How Inf lation Swindles the Equity Investor.”
  • Andrew Tobias’s 1983 article “Letters from Chairman Buffett,” the first review of his Berk­shire Hathaway shareholder letters.
  • Buffett’s stunningly prescient 2003 piece about derivatives, “Avoiding a Mega-Catastrophe.”
  • His unconventional thoughts on inheritance and philanthropy, including his intention to leave his kids “enough money so they would feel they could do anything, but not so much that they could do nothing.”
  • Bill Gates’s 1996 article describing his early impressions of Buffett as they struck up their close friendship.

Scores of Buffett books have been written, but none can claim this work’s combination of trust between two friends, the writer’s deep under­standing of Buffett’s world, and a very long-term perspective.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This fascinating collection presents a selection of articles about the financial mogul, many by Loomis and twelve12 by Buffett himself, published in Fortune Magazine from the time he first burst on the scene as a young financial genius up until today. As a longtime personal friend, she brings a unique perspective into his mindset, but readers will likely treasure Buffett's own insights most of all, such as his view of inheritance, reported in 1986: "To him the perfect amount to leave children is â??enough money so they would feel they could do anything, but not so much that they could do nothing.'" More recently, in 2010, he explained, "My wealth has come from a combination of living in America, some lucky genes, and compound interest. Both my children and I won what I call the ovarian lottery." His common sense and wry humor can be appreciated by everyone, but investors will be especially intrigued by gems like this explanation of Berkshire Hathaway's management philosophy: "We want people to join us because they want to be with us until they die." Loomis has created an engaging picture of a great influencer of our time. Agent: Tracy Brown, Tracy Brown Literary. (Nov.)
From the Publisher
“Loomis has created an engaging picture of a great influencer of our time.”
Publishers Weekly

“Serious investors as well as those interested in the history of Berkshire Hathaway and the philanthropic ideas of Buffett will enjoy these revealing pieces extracted from theFortunearchives.”
Kirkus Reviews

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780594535683
Publisher:
Portfolio Hardcover
Publication date:
11/21/2012
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
431,527
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

CAROL J. LOOMIS is a senior editor-at-large at Fortune, where she has worked since 1954. She has been the magazine’s expert on Warren Buf­fett since 1966 and has edited his annual letter to shareholders since 1977. Her many honors include five lifetime achievement awards, including a Gerald Loeb Award for business journalism and Time Inc.’s first-ever Henry Luce Award. This is her first book. She lives in Westchester County.

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Tapdancing to Work: Warren Buffett on Practically Everything, 1966-2012: A Fortune Magazine Book 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting information on how he invests, his perspective on life, biographical information on how he started out. Worthwhile read.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A lifetime of useful wisdom to apply toward your life, business. Excellent content.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
XAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAV. :3 Someone showed me how to post on the computer. Though, technically, I'm breaking my promise... meh. I'll be in and out of the virtual world. Afeadasae, momentarilly. <p> Also, I realised something when the thought hit me that I would never talk to you again. <p> Songs talking about goodbyes always talk about how they'll never see the person again, or how they're going to miss someone dearly, or how they left on purpose or left accidentally, and how goodbye is all painful and stuff, and how they had to move on to different chapters in life... But, as I thought of all this, I realised something. I don't want to go another chapter without you or Sparrow. And even though I'm perfectly insane for saying this, and if you both are pe<_>dophiles and will ha<_>ck everything and come and murder me in my sleep or whatever, I don't care. I love you guys. And I trust you completely. The second thoughts aren't going to hit me. Xavier... Steven. Steven, I honestly can't imagine a new chapter, or any future chapters beyond this point, without you guys. But to do that without NOOK, or Fb (which, by the way, I secretly despise), I would have to know you in person. <p> And so I've decided that when I am touring the world, or writing books, or however I'm going to be widely-know... I'm going to mention hints to you guys, so you can pick up who I am. I want to meet you both in person. So bad. Just give you both these big fat hugs and tell you thanks. And in saying this, you should know that I've lied about things that might anger you in finding out. I'm really sorry. :/ Pathetic that it took almost losing you guys to finally say it. You've been one of my best friends for over a year, and despite what anyone in the world may say, I think that leaving a best friend in the last chapter of your life can be considered a crime. If you don't feel mutually about the whole thing, I understand completely, I just had to tell you. Sorry. Love you. Xx <p> ~Swag
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I dunno. O.e I'm sorta okay now, but overall, I seriously need proffessional help. Hai. *Chibi Swagaroo climbs his pant leg and cuts holes into the knees of his pants.* e.e
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You cheered me up. :3 Ah, l needed that. Thank you. <p> I promise you, even though promises are vain and silly, that l will find you and return that hug with as much gusto. o.o Yeah, that's an empty promise, 'cause l don't know what the future holds in store for us. God may plan for me to be poor, to lead a family, to own my own business, feed children all over the world, or to simply be a God-fearing man. o.o l would gladly take a simple road of a difficult life than the tough road of easy living. I know, it sounds flipped around, but those who live easy have money. Money is the root of sin, and it can dig deep unless you have God there at every moment. <p> Anyways. The lies you have told are immaterial. Sure, lies re not good, but who you are has not lied to me. Your name, your face, where you live, what you like, and who you love are things that seem small when l think about what you are to me. I rely on you to be there as my best friend. I never thought l would find you, amongst the many popular kids around the nook, as my very own best friend. You are a one-of-a-kind trophie, really. I will never have one like you, and even though second place sounds bad, my friends aren't placed on a tier winding up or winding down. They are simply there for me. You represent the friend l hope all of my friends will be. Such as Sparrow, you can stand to be around me when others can not. Granted, it is over the interwebs, but l think that counts. :3<p> Swag, l love you. As a sister, you have to be around me until we can not stand each other, then we hve to talk again. Like a mother, you tell me what l need to do, and you have no fear that what you say is incorrect. Like a true friend, you are wholly comfortable with who and what l am, and deapite moments of angst or sadness between us, we remain inseperle until death. Sound like wha marriage should be. Heck, we could be married and bothing would change. Aside from the kids... And the house we would share. And the hugs... *sigh* o3o Meh. Anyways. Caught daydreaming. So embarassing. &bull;////&bull; <p> Facebook is desolate as it is full of life. Just find the right way to use it-- your own way-- and it will feel right eventually. See you, dearie. v.v
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Exceptional business content!
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U too
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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