The Taqwacores [NOOK Book]

Overview


A Muslim punk house in Buffalo, New York, inhabited by burqa-wearing riot girls, mohawked Sufis, straightedge Sunnis, Shi’a skinheads, Indonesian skaters, Sudanese rude boys, gay Muslims, drunk Muslims, and feminists. Their living room hosts parties and prayers, with a hole smashed in the wall to indicate the direction of Mecca. Their life together mixes sex, dope, and religion in roughly equal amounts, expressed in devotion to an Islamo-punk subculture, “taqwacore,” named for ...
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The Taqwacores

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NOOK Book (eBook - Revised Edition)
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Overview


A Muslim punk house in Buffalo, New York, inhabited by burqa-wearing riot girls, mohawked Sufis, straightedge Sunnis, Shi’a skinheads, Indonesian skaters, Sudanese rude boys, gay Muslims, drunk Muslims, and feminists. Their living room hosts parties and prayers, with a hole smashed in the wall to indicate the direction of Mecca. Their life together mixes sex, dope, and religion in roughly equal amounts, expressed in devotion to an Islamo-punk subculture, “taqwacore,” named for taqwa, an Arabic term for consciousness of the divine.
Originally self-published on photocopiers and spiralbound by hand, The Taqwacores has now come to be read as a manifesto for Muslim punk rockers and a “Catcher in the Rye for young Muslims.”

There are three different cover colors; red, white, and blue.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593763183
  • Publisher: Soft Skull Press, Inc.
  • Publication date: 12/23/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Revised Edition
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 758,186
  • File size: 281 KB

Meet the Author


Michael Muhammed Knight converted to Islam at sixteen after reading Malcolm X's biography, and spent two months at Faisal Mosque in Islamabad, Pakistan. He later left orthodox Islam. His writing regularly appears in progressive Islamic venues. He lives in Western New York State.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2008

    Young Muslims build a subculture on an underground book

    By Christopher Maag<BR/>Tuesday, December 23, 2008 HERALD TRIBUNE<BR/>CLEVELAND: Five years ago, young Muslims across the United States began reading and passing along a blurry, photocopied novel called "The Taqwacores," about imaginary punk rock Muslims in Buffalo.<BR/><BR/>"This book helped me create my identity," said Naina Syed, 14, a high school freshman in Coventry, Connecticut.<BR/><BR/>A Muslim born in Pakistan, Naina said she spent hours on the phone listening to her older sister read the novel to her. "When I finally read the book for myself," she said, "it was an amazing experience."<BR/><BR/>The novel is "The Catcher in the Rye" for young Muslims, said Carl Ernst, a professor of Islamic studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Springing from the imagination of Michael Muhammad Knight, it inspired disaffected young Muslims in the United States to form real Muslim punk bands and build their own subculture.<BR/><BR/>Now the underground success of Muslim punk has resulted in a low-budget independent film based on the book.<BR/><BR/>A group of punk artists living in a communal house in Cleveland called the Tower of Treason offered the house as the set for the movie. The crumbling streets and boarded-up storefronts of their neighborhood resemble parts of Buffalo. Filming took place in October, and the movie will be released next year, said Eyad Zahra, the director.<BR/><BR/>"To see these characters that used to live only inside my head out here walking around, and to think of all these kids living out parts of the book, it's totally surreal," Muhammad Knight, 31, said as he roamed the movie set.<BR/><BR/>As part of the set, a Muslim punk rock musician, Marwan Kamel, 23, painted "Osama McDonald," a figure with Osama bin Laden's face atop Ronald McDonald's body. Kamel said the painting was a protest against imperialism by American corporations and against Wahhabism, the strictest form of Islam.<BR/><BR/>Noureen DeWulf, 24, an actress who plays a rocker in the movie, defended the film's message.<BR/><BR/>"I'm a Muslim and I'm 100-percent American," DeWulf said, "so I can criticize my faith and my country. Rebellion? Punk? This is totally American."<BR/><BR/>The novel's title combines "taqwa," the Arabic word for "piety," with "hardcore," used to describe many genres of angry Western music.<BR/><BR/>For many young American Muslims, stigmatized by their peers after the Sept. 11 attacks but repelled by both the Bush administration's reaction to the attacks and the rigid conservatism of many Muslim leaders, the novel became a blueprint for their lives.<BR/><BR/>"Reading the book was totally liberating for me," said Areej Zufari, 34, a Muslim and a humanities professor at Valencia Community College in Orlando, Florida.<BR/><BR/>Zufari said she had listened to punk music growing up in Arkansas and found "The Taqwacores" four years ago.<BR/><BR/>"Here was someone as frustrated with Islam as me," she said, "and he expressed it using bands I love, like the Dead Kennedys. It all came together."<BR/><BR/>The novel's Muslim characters include Rabeya, a riot girl who plays guitar onstage wearing a burqa and leads a group of men and women in prayer. There is also Fasiq, a pot-smoking skater, and Jehangir, a drunk.<BR/><BR/>Such acts — playing Western music, women leading prayer, men and women praying together, drinking, smoking — are considered haram, or forbidden

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2011

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    Posted March 23, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2011

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