BN.com Gift Guide

Tarzan the Terrible (Dodo Press)

( 10 )

Overview

Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. His first story Under the Moons of Mars was serialised in All-Story magazine in 1912. Burroughs soon took up writing full-time and by the time the run of Under the Moons of Mars had finished he had completed two novels, including Tarzan of the Apes, which was published from October 1912 and went on to become his most successful brand. Burroughs also wrote ...
See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Tarzan the Terrible (Illustrated)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$0.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. His first story Under the Moons of Mars was serialised in All-Story magazine in 1912. Burroughs soon took up writing full-time and by the time the run of Under the Moons of Mars had finished he had completed two novels, including Tarzan of the Apes, which was published from October 1912 and went on to become his most successful brand. Burroughs also wrote popular science fiction/fantasy stories involving earthly adventurers transported to various planets, lost islands, and into the interior of the hollow earth in his Pellucidar stories (1915), as well as westerns and historical romances. Along with All-Story, many of his stories were published in the Argosy Magazine. Among his most famous works are: A Princess of Mars (1912), The Return of Tarzan (1913), The Gods of Mars (1913), The Warlord of Mars (1913-14), The Beasts of Tarzan (1914), At the Earth's Core (1914) and The Land that Time Forgot (1918).
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781406557756
  • Publisher: Dodo Press
  • Publication date: 8/24/2007
  • Pages: 260
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2012

    edgar rice burroughs was weigh ahead of his time...

    Tarzan the terrible was very entertaining, never dull.....full of imagination.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 16, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Tarzan the Ter­ri­ble by Edgar Rice Bur­roughs, the eighth novel

    Tarzan the Ter­ri­ble by Edgar Rice Bur­roughs, the eighth novel in the Tarzan series, con­tin­ues the adven­tures of the Ape Man from Tarzan the Untamed dur­ing World War I (the novel was pub­lished in 1921).

    Jane has been taken by Ger­mans sol­diers and Tarzan is fran­ti­cally look­ing for her. The fact that they are Eng­lish and World War I is rag­ing doesn’t help. Tarzan stum­bles upon Pal-ul-don (Land of Men) filled with strange humans and pre­his­toric animals.

    Tarzan befriends Ta-den, a war­rior of the Ho-don (a white and hair­less race) and Om-at, a chief of the Waz-don (hair and black skinned) tribes. Tarzan impresses his friends / cap­tur­ers so much that they name him Tarzan-Jad-Guru (Tarzan the Ter­ri­ble). Lo and behold, Jane is also a cap­tive at Pal-ul-don and is actu­ally lead­ing her incom­pe­tent Ger­man cap­tors through the jungle.

    Tarzan the Ter­ri­ble by Edgar Rice Bur­roughs should more accu­rately be called Tarzan the Untamed Part II. The story picks up from the point where Untamed has ended but the reader is privy to a bit more infor­ma­tion (I don’t think I’m spoil­ing any­thing when say­ing that Jane is … gasp … alive!)

    It seemed that in this book Mr. Bur­roughs has came to admit that Jane will be Tarzan’s mate, she comes to her own, has a bit more spunk and even hunts a rab­bit. Of course, our beloved pro­tag­o­nist is put through much agony, fights and dar­ing escapes, as is only appropriate.

    Even though there are still many more books in the series, it’s obvi­ous that at this point the author is milk­ing his suc­cess­ful for­mula for all its worth.
    And you know what?
    It works.

    While I did not enjoy this book as some of the oth­ers, I still thought the novel was excit­ing and fun to read. Bur­roughs sets up the dark­est regions of Africa to hold lost cities full with secrets, gold and … dinosaurs, not a bad setup for future novels.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2006

    Great till Burroughs blew the ending

    I've been a huge fan of Burroughs for well over a decade now, and I've read a huge majority of his writings. As a sequel to the hugely entertaining Tarzan the Untamed, this was a novel I expected a lot from, and Burroughs didn't disappoint--till the end, that is. This will include spoilers, so anyone reading this who doesn't want a conception of the novel's end had better look away. For all the personal wrongs they had done him and the fact they clearly intended raping his wife and butchering him, Burroughs doesn't let Tarzan get personal revenge on Obergatz, Lu-don, and Mo-sar. Instead, while Tarzan's trussed up to be slaughtered like a lamb, Korak suddenly appears and becomes the book's deus ex machina. While it's cool at least a member of Tarzan's family did away with the villains, they never suffered as they should have for the murder they were about to commit, nor for the rape the contemplated against Jane Clayton. Clearly, Burroughs should have had Korak show up and free his father so the two could start slaughtering the villains immediately. Had it not been for this, the book would easily have deserved five stars for its rich imagery and nonstop action. Sadly, Burroughs decided to take what could have been the greatest Tarzan novel of all and ruin the ending. It's still recommended though for the 99 1/2% of the book that is good.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)