Tatting Patterns and Designs

Tatting Patterns and Designs

by Gun Blomqvist, Elwy Persson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Here is a distinctive gallery of over 85 beautiful and useful tatted items — mats, bookmarks, edgings, collars, crowns, medallions, and more — all ideal for resting and developing the skills of both intermediate and advanced tatters.
Created and compiled by two well-known crafts and needlework experts, teachers, and editors, these delicate designs

Overview

Here is a distinctive gallery of over 85 beautiful and useful tatted items — mats, bookmarks, edgings, collars, crowns, medallions, and more — all ideal for resting and developing the skills of both intermediate and advanced tatters.
Created and compiled by two well-known crafts and needlework experts, teachers, and editors, these delicate designs include the dainty Annette and charming Margareta — lovely edgings that will add a touch of elegance to fine linens, handkerchiefs, and personal apparel — and exquisite doilies such as Mignonette and Peony, perfect for use as centerpieces, vanity sets, and table settings.
Each project is clearly photographed and detailed instructions specify what thread to use, the size of the design and number of shuttles needed, tatting stitches involved, and proper sequence for each. Also included are a brief history of this great traditional craft and instructions on its principal techniques.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486139920
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
06/08/2012
Series:
Dover Knitting, Crochet, Tatting, Lace
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
313,428
File size:
14 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Tatting Patterns and Designs


By Gun Blomqvist, Elwy Persson

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1967 for Frivoliteter, by Gun Blomquist and Elwy Persson.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-13992-0



CHAPTER 1

Tools & Materials


The most important tool for tatting is a shuttle. A shuttle should be about 7cm. (2in.) long and 2cm. (3/4 in.) wide, and made of celluloid, bone, tortoise shell, or plastic. It is made up of two tapering discs held together by a middle section called a bobbin. The tips of the discs should touch at both ends to keep the thread from getting loose unintentionally. There is a hole in the middle of the bobbin for threading the yarn. The yarn is pushed through the hole, wound round the bobbin of the shuttle until it reaches the outer edge. Make sure the shuttle is not too full, or the yarn will tend to get dirty and be harder to work with.

It is a good idea to have more than one shuttle on hand so that you can try out several patterns at the same time.

In more advanced work requiring two shuttles, it is helpful if the shuttles are different in colour as the two seperate yarns can then be easily distinguished. You will get the best results if you use an even, fine yarn, one with neither too loose nor too tight a twist. This kind of yarn is easy to work with.

D.M.C. Cordonnet Special is very good and is available in many different thicknesses and colours. The gauge numbers given in the instructions can, of course, be varied for coarser or finer yarns, as required. When considering what thickness the yarn should be, take into account the size of the finished article and the intricacy of the motif. As a general rule thicker yarns will suit bigger motifs, smaller yarns more delicate patterns.

We have tried out various other materials, such as window blind cord, fishing net twine, and rug warp, in an effort to produce a coarse, rustic effect, but these have proved uncomfortable to handle and difficult to work with. After all, the most delightful quality of tatting is its delicacy!

CHAPTER 2

Techniques


Tatting consists of stitches and picots. The most common stitch is the 'double stitch'. Picots are loops made by leaving a distance between double stitches, and it is important for both practical as well as aesthetic reasons that these be even. For this reason it is important to learn how to handle the shuttle evenly, without any jerking movements.


Joining Rings

When the required number of rings have been made, lift the work round your thumb. Join in the required picot. Both threads must be on the underside of the work.


Joining Threads

Make a weaver's knot (see Fig. 2–8). The join can be made either between two rings or onto the thread which is round the hand. The join should be positioned so that it is hidden by the stitches.


Second Thread from Ball

Make the double stitch of the first ring as usual, tucking in the end and letting it follow the shuttle thread a short distance. When the ring has been completed, make the chain, which requires a second thread, by reversing the work under the ring and round the hand. Proceed as for the first ring. When the chain has been completed, bring the double stitches together, reverse the work, make the next ring and join it to the first.


Two Shuttles

The second thread must be on a shuttle when parts of the chain do not face in the opposite direction to the ring. Two shuttles must also be used for working designs.


Definition of Terms

Inner ring — the middle portion of the work.

Ring – the section of the pattern which is always tightened so that a separate unit is formed.

Chain – a section of the pattern where the beginning and end are connected.

Josephine knot – a section of the pattern consisting of half stitches. The beginning and end do not quite join.

Half stitch – the first half of a double stitch.

Picot – a loop between double stitches.

A middle ring consisting, for instance, of 2 × 12, will theoretically contain only eleven picots, but actually it must have twelve. The twelfth one is worked by tying the two ends together to form a picot.


Nature as a Model

When you have mastered the technique, you will want to create your own patterns. Nature is full of things to inspire the tatter, such as seed capsules, leaves, flowers, dry twigs, mosses, and any number of things. See if the pictures on pages 20, 31, 52, 73 and 88 can't suggest something to you.

CHAPTER 3

Edgings & Insertions


Gullan

Purpose: Edging

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 80

Size: 0.7 cm. (1/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, + = joining, — = picot.

Number of shuttles: One


R5 — 5 — 5 — 5. R5 + 5 — 5 — 5.

Repeat until the lace is the required length.


Inga

Purpose: Edging

Yarn. D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 2 cm. (7/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, + = joining, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One


R5 — 5 — 5 — 5. R6 — 6. R5+5 — 5 — 5. R6+4 — 2 — 2 — 4 — 6.

R5+5 — 5 — 5. R6+6.

Repeat until the lace is the required length.


Ulla

Purpose: Edging or insertion

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 1.4 cm. (5/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, × = joining, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread

R5 — 5 — 5 — 5. C5 — 5. R5+5 — 5 — 5. C5 — 5. R5+5 — 5 — 5.

Repeat until the lace is the required length.


Astrid

Purpose: Edging

Yarn: D.M.C. 30

Size: 3 cm. (1 3/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, + = joining, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread


R5 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 5. R5+3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 5.

R 5 + 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 5. C5 — 5 — 3 — 3 — 5 — 5+. C5 — 5.

R5+5 — 5. C5. R5 + 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 5.

R5+3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 5. R5+3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 5. C5.

R5+5 — 5. C5+5+. C5+5 — 3 — 3 — 5 — 5.


Fia

Purpose: Insertion

Yarn: D.M.C. No.20

Size: 2 cm. (3/4 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, + = joining, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One


Row 1: R5 — 5 — 5 — 5. C7. R5+5 — 5 — 5. C7.

Repeat until the lace is the required length.

Row 2: R 5 — 5 + 5 — 5. C7. R5+5+5 — 5. C7.


Ingeborg

Purpose: Edging or insertion

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 1 cm. (3/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, C = chain, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread.

C2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2. Reverse work.

C2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2.

Join to the picot first made.

Repeat until the lace is the required length.


Martha

Purpose: Edging

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 1.5 cm. (5/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C= chain, + = joining, 2 × 6=2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread

Row 1 : R6 — 5 — 1. R 1 + 5 — 5 — 1. R 1 + 5 — 6. C16. R6+5 — 1.

R 1 + 5 — 5 — 1. R 1 + 5 — 6. C16.

Repeat until the lace is the required length.

Row 2 : + C 2 — 4 — 2 × 7 — 4 — 2 + 4. C2+4 — 2 × 7 — 4 — 2+.


Carla

Purpose: Edging

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 2 cm. (7/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, + = joining, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread

Row 1: R 4 — 4 — 4 — 4. C5 — 5. R4 + 6 — 6 — 4. C5 — 5.

R 4 + 4 — 4 — 4. C5 — 5. R 4 + 6 — 6 — 4.

Repeat until the lace is the required length.

Row 2: + C 2 — 9 — 9 — 2 +. C2+9 — 9 — 2+.


Boel

Purpose: Edging

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 4 cm. (1 5/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, + = joining, 3 × 7 = 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread

Motif 1: Three-leaved clover: R5 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5.

R5+2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5. R5+2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5. C5 — 2 — 2 — 5.

R5 + 4 — 4 — 4 — 4 — 5. C8.

Three-leaved clover: R5 + 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5. R5+2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5.

R5+2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5. C8. R5+4 — 4 — 4 — 4 — 5.

C5+2+2+5.

Three-leaved clover: R5 — 2 — 2 + 2 — 2 — 5. R5 + 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5.

R5+2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 5. C 5 — 3 × 7 — 5 +. C 5 — 3 × 7 — 5.

Motif 2 and all subsequent motifs: Same as motif 1 except that the chains in the upper edge are joined, as the illustration shows.


Selma

Purpose: Insertion

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 4.5 cm. (1 3/4 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, Hs = half stitch, 2 × 6 = 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread

Row 1: R3 × 12. C2 × 6. R5 — 5. C2 × 6. R5 — 5. C2 × 6.

R3 × 12.

Row 2:8 Hs. 8 Hs. R5 + 5. R5 — 5. 8Hs. 8Hs.

R 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 + 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3.

R3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3+3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3. R3 × 12. R3 × 12.

8 Hs. 8 Hs. R5+5. R5 — 5. 8 Hs. 8 Hs.

R 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 + 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3. R 3 × 12. R 3 × 12.

Row 3: Same as row 1 but joined, as the illustration shows.


Annette

Purpose: Edging

Yarn: D.M.C. No.40

Size: 3.5 cm. (1 3/8 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, + = joining, 3 × 8 = 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3, — = picot

Number of shuttles: Two


Shuttle 1: R 3 × 10.

Shuttle 2: R 3 × 12. C3 + 3 × 9 +.

Shuttle 1: R3 + 3 × 7.

Shuttle 2: C3 + 3 × 9 +.

Shuttle 1: R3 + 3 × 9. C7+7 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 7 — 7.


Margareta

Purpose: Edging

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 5 cm. (2 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number= number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, + = joining, — = picot

Number of shuttles: Two


Row 1: Shuttle 1:R5 — 5 — 5 — 5. R5 + 5 — 2 — 5 — 5. R5 + 5 — 5 — 5.

Shuttle 2 : C10. R5 — 5 — 5 — 5.

Shuttle 1:R5 + 5 — 5 — 5. C5. R5+5 — 5 — 5.

Shuttle 2 R 5 + 5 — 5 — 5.

Shuttle 1: C10.

Shuttle 2 R 5 + 3 — 2 — 3 — 5. R 5 + 3 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 3 — 5.

R5+3 — 2 — 3 — 5.

Shuttle 1 : C10. R5 — 5+5 — 5.

Shuttle 2 R 5 + 5 — 5 — 5.

Shuttle 1: C5. R5+5 — 5 — 5.

Shuttle 2 R 5 + 5 — 5 — 5. C10. Repeat Row 1.

Row 2: Attach thread to bottom ring.

+C1 — 1+3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 5.

R5 — 5+5 — 5. C5. R5 — 5+5 — 5. C5. R5 — 5+5 — 5.

C5+3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3+1 — 1+.


Svea

Purpose: Edging. Can also be used for collar

Yarn: D.M.C. No 30

Size: 5 cm. (2 in.) wide

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, R = ring, C = chain, 2 × 6 = 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2 — 2, — = picot

Number of shuttles: One, and second thread


Motif 1 : R3 — 3 — 3 — 3. R3 — 3 — 3 — 3. C6 — 6. R3 — 3 — 3 — 3.

C6 — 6. R3 — 3 — 3 — 3. C6 — 6. R4 — 4 — 4. C6.

R 4 + 4 — 4 — 4. R 4 + 2 × 6 — 4. R4+4 — 4 — 4. C6. R 4 — 4 — 4.

C6+6. R3 — 3 — 3 — 3. C6+6. R3 — 3 — 3 — 3. C6+6.

R3 — 3+3 — 3. R3 — 3 — 3 — 3. C6 — 6.

Motif 2 and all subsequent motifs: The same as 1.

CHAPTER 4

Stars


Mounting a mobile requires four brass wires, 17, 13, 11 and 9 cm. (6 3/4, 5 1/4, 4 3/8, and 3 1/2 in.) long, respectively. The length of the yarn to link the wires has to be worked out so that the motifs hang freely and balance correctly.

Purpose: For mobile, table-cloth or handkerchief insertions

Yarn: D.M.C. No. 30

Size: 6.5 cm. (2 5/8 in.), 5 cm. (2 in.), 4 cm. (1 5/8 in.), 35 cm. (1 3/8 in.), 2 cm. (3/4 in.)

Abbreviations: Number = number of double stitches between the picots, Ir = inner ring, R = ring, C = chain, + = joining, + — = joining and picot, 3 × 4 = 3 — 3 — 3 — 3, — = picot


Star No. 1. Two Shuttles

Row 1: Shuttle 1: R 4 — 4 — 5 — 5. C 6 + — 6. Repeat 5 times.

Row 2 : C8 + (shuttle 2 : R6 — 6)8 + — 8 + (shuttle 2 : R6 — 6)8 +.

Row 3:C6 — 6 — 6 — 6 — 6 — 6 — 6+. C6 + 6 — 6 — 6 — 6 — 6 — 6.

Row 4:C + 6 + — 8 + — 8 + — 8 + — 6 +.

Row 5 : C6 + (shuttle 2 : R 6 — 6) 10 + (shuttle 2: R 6 — 6) 10 + (shuttle 2:

R 6 — 6) 10 + (shuttle 2: R 6 — 6) 6 +.


Star No. 2. One Shuttle and Second Thread

Ir: 5 × 5. Tie ends for fifth picot and cut.

R2 — 2 — 2+2 — 2 — 2. C5. R2 × 11. C3 × 4. R4 + 4. C3 × 6.

R4 + 4. C3 × 4 + 5. C5.

Repeat 5 times.


Star No. 3. Two Shuttles

Shuttle 1:R5 — 5 — 5 — 5 (middle).

Shuttle 2:R5 — 10 — 5.

Shuttle 1: C11.

Shuttle 2:R6 + 3 — 3 — 3 — 6. R 6 + 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 6.

R6+3 — 3 — 3 — 6.

Shuttle 1: C11.

Repeat 4 times.


Star No. 4. One Shuttle and Second Thread

R6 — 6. C3 × 7. R6 + 6. C3 × 5. R6 + 6. C3 × 5. R6 + 6.

C3 × 5+. C3 × 4. R6+6. C3 × 4. R6+6. C3 × 4. R6+6.

C3 × 4. R6+6. C3 × 4. R6 + 6. C3 × 4. R6 + 6. C3 × 4.


Star No. 5. Tie Shuttle and Second Threads Together.

C3 × 7. R3 × 12. R3 + 3 × 11. C3 + 3 × 6.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Tatting Patterns and Designs by Gun Blomqvist, Elwy Persson. Copyright © 1967 for Frivoliteter, by Gun Blomquist and Elwy Persson.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >