BN.com Gift Guide

Taxes and Business Strategy: A Planning Approach / Edition 3

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 98%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $41.03   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$41.03
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(488)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2004 Hardcover New

Ships from: san francisco, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$155.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(193)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$175.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(193)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

This book takes an MBA style strategy perspective by considering the tax, accounting, and finance trade-offs involved in tax planning. Reflected in this revision are all changes in the tax code.

Also covered: extensive analysis of technical tax rules applied to corporate mergers and acquisitions; explanation of accounting for income taxes; discussion on College Savings Plans (529s); up-to-date material on new tax rates on dividends and capital gains; and much more.

For individuals furthering their personal or formal education of tax strategy, investment banking, corporate finance, strategy consulting, money management, or venture capital.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131465534
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 3/30/2004
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 576
  • Product dimensions: 6.98 (w) x 9.23 (h) x 1.07 (d)

Meet the Author

Myron S. Scholes is a Partner of Oak Hill Capital Management and a Principal of Oak Hill Platinum Partners. He is also involved in the private and public investment activities of the Robert M. Bass organization. Professor Scholes has been the Frank E. Buck Professor of Finance Emeritus at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business since 1996.

Professor Scholes is widely known for his seminal work in options pricing, capital markets, tax policies, and the financial services industry. He is co-originator of the Black-Scholes options pricing model, which is the basis of the pricing and risk management technology that is used to value and to manage the risk of financial instruments around the world. For this work, he was awarded the Alfred Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1997.

He was the Frank E. Buck Professor of Finance at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business from 1983 to 1996 and a Senior Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution from 1987 to 1996. He received a Ph.D. in 1969 from the University of Chicago where he served as the Edward Eagle Brown Professor of Finance in the Graduate School of Business from 1974 to 1983 and Director of the Center for Research in Security Prices from 1976 to 1983. He was an Assistant and Associate Professor of Finance at Sloan School of Management, MIT, from 1969 to 1974.

Professor Scholes is a member of the Econometric Society and served as President of the American Finance Association in 1990. Professor Scholes has honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Paris, McMaster University, and Louvain University.

Professor Scholes has consulted widely with many financial institutions, corporations, and exchanges. He was a Principal and Limited Partner at Long-Term Capital Management LP, an investment management firm, from 1993 to 1998. From 1991 to 1993, he was a Managing Director at Salomon Brothers, a member of Salomon's risk management committee, and Co-Head of its Fixed Income Derivatives Sales and Trading Department, where he was instrumental in building Salomon Swapco, its derivatives intermediation subsidiary, and in expanding its derivative sales and trading group.

Mark A. Wolfson is a Managing Partner of Oak Hill Capital Management (OHCM) and has played instrumental roles in the establishment of Oak Hill Strategic Partners, Oak Hill Venture Partners, Oak Hill Platinum Partners, Oak Hill Investment Management, and the Oak Hill Special Opportunities Fund. OHCM manages Oak Hill Capital Partners, a private equity partnership founded by Robert M. Bass and his longtime team of investment professionals. Mr. Wolfson serves on the Boards of Directors of 230 Park Investors, Accretive Healthcare, Caribbean Restaurants, DaVinci I, LLC (Japan real estate), eGain Communications, Financial Engines, and Investment Technology Group. Mr. Wolfson holds the title of Consulting Professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he has been a faculty member since 1977, including a three-year term as Associate Dean, and formerly held the title of Dean Witter Professor. He has also taught at the Harvard Business School and the University of Chicago and has been a Visiting Scholar at the Sloan School of Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. -Mr. Wolfson has been a Research Associate at The National Bureau of Economic Research since 1988 and serves on The Board of Trustees of Menlo School as well as the Board of Advisors and Executive Committee of The Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

Merle Erickson is an Associate Professor of Accounting at the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago where he teaches a tax strategy course in the MBA program and executive education courses that focus on tax-related valuation issues in mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in 1996. Professor Erickson's research focuses on tax-related valuation issues, earnings and balance sheet management, and various aspects of accounting fraud. His research has been published in The Accounting Review, Journal of Accounting Research, Journal of Accounting and Economics, Journal of the American Taxation Association, the National Tax Journal, and Tax Notes. He is also the author/editor of Cases in Tax Strategy (Pearson/Prentice Hall). Professor Erickson has received awards for his teaching and research, and he consults periodically with both private and governmental entities. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Accounting Research and is currently on the editorial boards of The Accounting Review and the Journal of the American Taxation Association.

Edward L. Maydew is Chair of the Accounting Area and the David E. Hoffman Term Professor of Accounting at the University of North Carolina, KenanFlagler Business School. He also serves as Director of Research at the UNC Tax Center. Professor Maydew formerly served on the faculty of the University of Chicago and earned his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. His research and teaching interests span a variety of tax and accounting topics, and he has received a number of awards for research and teaching. He has published in The Accounting Review, Journal of Accounting Research, Journal of Accounting and Economics, Journal of Public Economics, National Tax Journal, and Journal of the American Taxation Association. He has assisted firms in a variety of complex accounting and tax matters. He is an Associate Editor at the Journal of Accounting and Economics and serves or has served on the editorial boards of Review of Accounting Studies, Accounting Horizons, and Journal of the American Taxation Association.

Terry Shevlin is Deloitte & Touche Professor of Accounting at the University of Washington. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1986. He teaches or has taught financial accounting at the undergraduate level, taxes and business strategy at the graduate level, and seminars in empirical tax research -and capital markets research at the Ph.D. level. He has presented talks on research in taxation at the American Accounting Association Doctoral Consortium on three separate occasions and has given presentations at both the Big 10 and PAC 10 Doctoral Consortiums.

Professor Shevlin's research has been published in The Accounting Review, Journal of Accounting Research, Journal of Accounting and Economics, Contemporary Accounting Research, Journal of the American Taxation Association, Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, Review of Accounting Studies, and Accounting Horizons. In addition to his interest in taxation, his research interests include earnings management, capital markets, and employee stock options. He has twice won both the American Accounting Association Competitive Manuscript Award and the American Taxation Association Tax Manuscript Award. He served as editor of the Journal of the American Taxation Association from 1996-1999, currently serves as Senior Editor of The Accounting Review (2002-2005), and serves on a number of journal editorial boards. He also serves as the Faculty Director of the Ph.D. Program at the University of Washington Business School.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

This book was written primarily for MBA students and graduates, specifically for those embarking on (or already in) careers in investment banking, corporate finance, strategy consulting, money management, or venture capital. Executives and finance professionals in such careers are typically not aiming to become tax specialists but do recognize the competitive advantage that comes from a solid understanding of the decision contexts that give rise to tax planning opportunities, how to integrate tax strategy into the bigger picture of corporate decision making, and the dramatic impact that changes in transaction structure can have on after-tax cash flows.

Every top MBA program teaches its students the fundamentals of corporate finance, financial statement analysis and valuation, and investments. Every MBA graduate knows how to perform a discounted cash flow analysis and apply the NPV criterion—valuable skills, but not something that differentiates oneself. MBA programs historically have been deficient, however, at teaching their students about the pervasive role taxes play in decision making. Each of the authors has taught taxes and business strategy at the MBA level. Their courses have been, and are, uniformly popular at their respective institutions. Former students have reported back that they possess a competitive advantage over those MBA graduates who know little or nothing about tax strategy. The material in this book draws from and builds on the authors' classroom and business experiences, as well as the experiences of colleagues around the country, and is not duplicated in any other text.

The book's MBA focus comes from integrating the tax law with the fundamentalsof corporate finance and microeconomics. Through integration with traditional MBA topics, the book provides a framework for understanding how taxes affect decision making, asset prices, equilibrium returns, and the financial and operational structure of firms. Relative to legal-based tax books, this text focuses more on the economic consequences of alternative contracting arrangements than on the myriad details and exceptions of the tax laws governing the arrangements. It is not meant to imply that the details of the tax laws are unimportant; they certainly are important. In fact, students new to the tax law will find that this text provides them with significant tax legal knowledge in certain key areas where taxes play a big role in decision making and areas MBAs are likely to encounter in their careers (e.g., mergers and acquisitions, employee stock options, international tax). In addition, the book integrates tax with financial accounting by emphasizing differences and trade-offs between the taxation and the financial accounting of a transaction. CHANGES IN THE THIRD EDITION

The text retains the same chapter and topic structure as the prior edition. Our objectives for the revision include:

  • Updating the text to reflect major changes in the tax laws.
  • Adding analyses of selected tax law changes.
  • Replacing some old analyses with new more relevant analysis.
  • Updating the lists of additional readings, which should be particularly useful to faculty and doctoral students.

The financial accounting for corporate taxes is explained and illustrated in a new appendix to Chapter 2 for those wishing to relate tax planning to corporate financial statements. Discussion of College Savings Plans (529 plans) was added to Chapter 3. Chapter 4 (organizational form choice) was updated to reflect the new tax rates on dividends and capital gains. A discussion of corporate/individual tax integration using the Australian system as a vehicle for illustration was added as an appendix to this chapter.

Additional material clarifying corporate marginal tax rates was added to Chapter 7. New material on restricted stock and employee stock options was added to Chapter 8. A new appendix explaining and illustrating the accounting for the income tax benefits received by corporations on employee stock options was added to Chapter 8, with discussion of how this accounting affects estimates of corporate taxable income and marginal tax rates.

Chapters 10 and 11 (international tax) reflect the repeal of the Foreign Sales Corporation and provide discussions of the current controversies over export subsidies and corporate inversion transactions.

Chapter 12 primarily reflects the 2003 changes in dividend taxation and changes in the accounting treatment of trust preferred stock.

Chapters 13-17 (mergers and acquisitions) were updated to reflect tax law changes and the change in the financial accounting rules for mergers and acquisitions where the pooling method of accounting is no longer allowed and goodwill is no longer amortized.

Chapter 18 (estate and gift planning) was updated for the major changes in estate and gift taxation that were enacted in 2001 and are being phased-in over the decade.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introduction to tax strategy 1
Ch. 2 Tax law fundamentals 19
Ch. 3 Returns on alternative savings vehicles 58
Ch. 4 Choosing the optimal organizational form 81
Ch. 5 Implicit taxes and clienteles, arbitrage, restrictions, and frictions 118
Ch. 6 Nontax costs of tax planning 155
Ch. 7 The importance of marginal tax rates and dynamic T planning considerations 184
Ch. 8 Compensation planning 211
Ch. 9 Pension and retirement planning 256
Ch. 10 Multinational tax planning : introduction and investment decisions 286
Ch. 11 Multinational tax planning : foreign tax credit limitat and income shifting 317
Ch. 12 Corporations : formation, operation, capital structure, and liquidation 335
Ch. 13 Introduction to mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures 363
Ch. 14 Taxable acquisitions of freestanding C corporations 381
Ch. 15 Taxable acquisitions of S corporations 407
Ch. 16 Tax-free acquisitions of freestanding C corporations 432
Ch. 17 Tax planning for divestitures 472
Ch. 18 Estate and gift tax planning 506
Read More Show Less

Preface

This book was written primarily for MBA students and graduates, specifically for those embarking on (or already in) careers in investment banking, corporate finance, strategy consulting, money management, or venture capital. Executives and finance professionals in such careers are typically not aiming to become tax specialists but do recognize the competitive advantage that comes from a solid understanding of the decision contexts that give rise to tax planning opportunities, how to integrate tax strategy into the bigger picture of corporate decision making, and the dramatic impact that changes in transaction structure can have on after-tax cash flows.

Every top MBA program teaches its students the fundamentals of corporate finance, financial statement analysis and valuation, and investments. Every MBA graduate knows how to perform a discounted cash flow analysis and apply the NPV criterion—valuable skills, but not something that differentiates oneself. MBA programs historically have been deficient, however, at teaching their students about the pervasive role taxes play in decision making. Each of the authors has taught taxes and business strategy at the MBA level. Their courses have been, and are, uniformly popular at their respective institutions. Former students have reported back that they possess a competitive advantage over those MBA graduates who know little or nothing about tax strategy. The material in this book draws from and builds on the authors' classroom and business experiences, as well as the experiences of colleagues around the country, and is not duplicated in any other text.

The book's MBA focus comes from integrating the tax law with the fundamentals of corporate finance and microeconomics. Through integration with traditional MBA topics, the book provides a framework for understanding how taxes affect decision making, asset prices, equilibrium returns, and the financial and operational structure of firms. Relative to legal-based tax books, this text focuses more on the economic consequences of alternative contracting arrangements than on the myriad details and exceptions of the tax laws governing the arrangements. It is not meant to imply that the details of the tax laws are unimportant; they certainly are important. In fact, students new to the tax law will find that this text provides them with significant tax legal knowledge in certain key areas where taxes play a big role in decision making and areas MBAs are likely to encounter in their careers (e.g., mergers and acquisitions, employee stock options, international tax). In addition, the book integrates tax with financial accounting by emphasizing differences and trade-offs between the taxation and the financial accounting of a transaction.

CHANGES IN THE THIRD EDITION

The text retains the same chapter and topic structure as the prior edition. Our objectives for the revision include:

  • Updating the text to reflect major changes in the tax laws.
  • Adding analyses of selected tax law changes.
  • Replacing some old analyses with new more relevant analysis.
  • Updating the lists of additional readings, which should be particularly useful to faculty and doctoral students.

The financial accounting for corporate taxes is explained and illustrated in a new appendix to Chapter 2 for those wishing to relate tax planning to corporate financial statements. Discussion of College Savings Plans (529 plans) was added to Chapter 3. Chapter 4 (organizational form choice) was updated to reflect the new tax rates on dividends and capital gains. A discussion of corporate/individual tax integration using the Australian system as a vehicle for illustration was added as an appendix to this chapter.

Additional material clarifying corporate marginal tax rates was added to Chapter 7. New material on restricted stock and employee stock options was added to Chapter 8. A new appendix explaining and illustrating the accounting for the income tax benefits received by corporations on employee stock options was added to Chapter 8, with discussion of how this accounting affects estimates of corporate taxable income and marginal tax rates.

Chapters 10 and 11 (international tax) reflect the repeal of the Foreign Sales Corporation and provide discussions of the current controversies over export subsidies and corporate inversion transactions.

Chapter 12 primarily reflects the 2003 changes in dividend taxation and changes in the accounting treatment of trust preferred stock.

Chapters 13-17 (mergers and acquisitions) were updated to reflect tax law changes and the change in the financial accounting rules for mergers and acquisitions where the pooling method of accounting is no longer allowed and goodwill is no longer amortized.

Chapter 18 (estate and gift planning) was updated for the major changes in estate and gift taxation that were enacted in 2001 and are being phased-in over the decade.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2005

    Good text book

    We use this in our MBA course, and it is fairly comprehensive and not as boring as you would think of a book on tax. The only complaint I have is that I wish they publish an answer guide to the questions in the text.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)