Taxi & Bun and the Vampyre Cult of Jesu Nosferatu [NOOK Book]

Overview

e:
Suppose you learned several friends died at the hands of worshipers of a Vampire savior cult. One young man is ritually sacrificed in a ceremony recorded in a snuff film. The film is made by a likeable but twisted auteur and recognized as of considerable artistic merit and commercial worth. Two other youths die from heroin overdoses; perhaps accidental but probably premeditated. What would Jesus do? Well most of us probably would suppose He would be really annoyed by the ...
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Taxi & Bun and the Vampyre Cult of Jesu Nosferatu

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Overview

e:
Suppose you learned several friends died at the hands of worshipers of a Vampire savior cult. One young man is ritually sacrificed in a ceremony recorded in a snuff film. The film is made by a likeable but twisted auteur and recognized as of considerable artistic merit and commercial worth. Two other youths die from heroin overdoses; perhaps accidental but probably premeditated. What would Jesus do? Well most of us probably would suppose He would be really annoyed by the sacrilege. So then, let’s ask, what would you do? OK. You read; you’d mind your own business. When Taxi and Bun are asked to help they don’t equivocate; they pitch right in to resolve the motive and chase the perpetrator.
Commercial snuff films; a vampire savior cult. Murder most foul, drug overdoses. The locations change from Gay discos and S&M venues in Manhattan, to a loony bin on the Hudson run by the inmates and a do it all Montreal club scene. The detecting is fast paced and the characters standouts: a corrupt cop, a Goth dominatrix and a Vampyre boutique owner all figure in the puzzle. Taxi and Bun are joined in their second bizarre investigation by a club boy dilatant, a street savvy black skip tracer and the Tracker brothers – a weird family of almost bloodhound investigators.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015511352
  • Publisher: Pavilion Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/28/2012
  • Series: Taxi & Bun Mysteries, #2
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

“Scribble, scribble, scribble” was George III’s pithy observation concerning Edward Gibbon’s Decline and fall of the Roman Empire; likewise were the endless papers prepared in NYU’s Ph. D program, reprised by years of administrative management writing inane corporate drivel. Freed from inescapable drudgery I began banging out stories, much as a sailor home from the sea takes up an oar and a rowing goes.

Seeking a Dutch colonial country home I found no book provided the information I needed; two years and a trip to the Netherlands filled in the lacunae and out popped The Dutch and Their Homes in the Hudson Valley. Well received (it ran through two editions) it remains worth acquiring if you want to know anything about a Dutch colonial house or feel compelled to read up on the period and people. Next was Vernacular to Spectacular in which I examined how houses changed 1700-1830. It demonstrates how function and life styles followed dictates imposed by domestic design changes. It also describes how those changes were transmitted from London and Paris European to the contemporary howling wilderness in the Hudson Valley. The third book (in is something of a trilogy) is Weeding Women. It examines that role women and kitchen gardens played in early America. Lest we forget without those weeding women the founding fathers would have bedded hungry, alone and heirless.

Wearying of footnotes I turned my hand converting far too much knowledge to sit idle into A Lad from Sneek. (I assure you that Sneek is a town in the Netherlands.) The book relates how a lad and his bonte coe (spotted calf) arrive in New Netherlands and grow up with the country. The tale offers a tour of 1654 Amsterdam from warehouses to whorehouses, a gruesome North Atlantic crossing, an introduction to New York’s first recorded madam Greitje Reyner and her house on Bridge street, captivity among the Huron’s, trade with the Mohawks, the African slave trade, life with Caribbean pirates and buccaneers and various frontier adventures at the cutting edge of wilderness thirty miles north of Albany – once called Beversfuyck or beaver trap, but suggestive of what politicians there have long done to us.

The Saga of Freydis Eiriksdatter is a tale that relates the adventures of a fictive Norse colony in North America. Freydis was the daughter of Eirik the Red settler of Greenland and half-sister of Leif Eirikson discoverer of No
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