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Tchaikovsky, Myaskovsky: Violin Concertos
     

Tchaikovsky, Myaskovsky: Violin Concertos

by Vadim Repin
 
There are currently some 100 recordings of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in the catalogue, so jaded classical CD collectors might be forgiven for greeting any new version with a shrug. But, in fact, this performance by Vadim Repin is something to really get excited about, for not since the days of Leonid Kogan

Overview

There are currently some 100 recordings of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in the catalogue, so jaded classical CD collectors might be forgiven for greeting any new version with a shrug. But, in fact, this performance by Vadim Repin is something to really get excited about, for not since the days of Leonid Kogan and David Oistrakh has the Tchaikovsky been played with such a strong, sinewy tone and interpretive freshness. From his very first entrance, Repin gives the impression that he is improvising his part -- and that's no small feat in so ubiquitous a piece. The Canzonetta seems especially poignant at such a broad tempo, as the violin's part takes on the character of an intimate confession. The finale, on the other hand, blazes with excitement, although it's never hard-pressed until the final pages, which zoom forward like a ball from a very well aimed canon. Collectors should also rejoice at the inclusion of Nicolay Myaskovsky's rarely heard Violin Concerto. Myaskovsky wasn't a tunesmith like Tchaikovsky, but he did share the elder composer's predilection for dark-hued lyricism, and those listeners who require generous doses of Russian melancholy should find plenty to wallow in here. Repin certainly makes a convincing case for Myaskovsky's Concerto, and let's hope that young violinists are inspired to add it to their repertory. Valery Gergiev and the Kirov Orchestra follow Repin's lead, digging into both scores with gusto -- though not always with the greatest refinement. In any case, this one is not to be missed.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - James Leonard
Is there room for another Tchaikovsky concerto? Is there room for one of the most over-played concertos in the standard repertoire? If there is, this is the one. Violinist Vadim Repin performs the concerto with cheeky brilliance, playing it with a smile in his tone like a character out of No�l Coward. Valery Gergiev goes right along with Repin, engaging in clever repartee right down to the last laugh at the end of the Allegro vivacissimo. Even the sorrowful Canzonetta seems to be smiling through its tears in Repin and Gergiev's performance. Is there room for even one Myaskovsky concerto? Is there room for even one of the most rarely played concertos at the far fringes of the repertoire? If there is, this is the one. Repin and Gergiev perform the work with the fervor of true believers. From the brooding melancholy of the opening Allegro through the lyrical nobility of the Adagio e molto cantabile to the dashing Allegro scherzando, Repin and Gergiev's interpretation testifies to the greatness of Myaskovsky's concerto. Although the darkly Romantic music of Myaskovsky has never caught on outside Russia, this performance compels belief.
Gramophone - Rob Cowan
It's a crackling performance, one of the best of the younger generation, and dynamically accompanied by Gergiev.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/14/2003
Label:
Philips
UPC:
0028947334323
catalogNumber:
473343

Tracks

  1. Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35  - Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky  - Clive Bennett  - Valery Gergiev  -  Mariinsky (Kirov) Theater Orchestra  - Vadim Repin  - Jeremy Tilston
  2. Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 44  - Nikolay Myaskovsky  - Clive Bennett  - Valery Gergiev  -  Mariinsky (Kirov) Theater Orchestra  - Vadim Repin  - Jeremy Tilston

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