Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Bach: Piano Concertos

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - James Leonard
Sviatoslav Richter has been judged by many listeners and critics to have been the greatest pianist of the second half of the 20th century, and his recordings are highly valued by collectors. The question with any new Richter reissue is how it compares with other performances of the same works and with other releases of the same recordings. In the case of this Supraphon reissue, it is a question of how these 1954 recordings of the first piano concertos of Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Bach, made with Czech conductors and orchestras, compare with Richter's other recordings of the same works. Richter recorded Tchaikovsky's first concerto in 1958 with Yevgeny Mravinsky and the ...
See more details below
CD
$14.24
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$14.99 List Price
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (4) from $8.38   
  • New (4) from $8.37   

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - James Leonard
Sviatoslav Richter has been judged by many listeners and critics to have been the greatest pianist of the second half of the 20th century, and his recordings are highly valued by collectors. The question with any new Richter reissue is how it compares with other performances of the same works and with other releases of the same recordings. In the case of this Supraphon reissue, it is a question of how these 1954 recordings of the first piano concertos of Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Bach, made with Czech conductors and orchestras, compare with Richter's other recordings of the same works. Richter recorded Tchaikovsky's first concerto in 1958 with Yevgeny Mravinsky and the Leningrad Philharmonic, and in 1962 with Herbert von Karajan and the Vienna Symphony. This 1954 recording has a freshness that the other two cannot match. Richter gives his virtuosity free rein, and the results are incredibly exciting. On the other hand, Richter benefits greatly in the 1958 recording from having the iron-handed Mravinsky on the podium. Karel Ancerl and the Czech Philharmonic too willingly defer to Richter, and Mravinsky does a better job of holding soloist and orchestra together. Karajan also holds things together, except that Richter unfortunately seems at times to be struggling against the conductor's tight-fisted control. Of the three versions, this reissue would rank second. Richter recorded the Prokofiev first concerto only one other time, in 1952 with Kiril Kondrashin and the Moscow Youth Symphony. As great as that performance is and Richter did seem more comfortable with Russian forces behind him, this one is better. His virtuosity is just as flashy, but perhaps more substantive in the work's outer sections, while the central Andante comes off as more deeply felt. Ancerl's Prague Symphony plays rings around Kondrashin's youth orchestra, making this reissue the clear winner. Richter only made one other recording of the Bach first concerto, with Kurt Sanderling directing the USSR State Symphony in 1955. Here, the contest could go either way. Richter is equally good in both, but his performances are very different: in the 1954 version, he seems more driven, even more demonic, while in 1955 he seems more masterful and more in control. The conductors and orchestras do an equally fine job of accompanying him, with Talich and the Czech Philharmonic playing with Richter, and Sanderling and the Moscow orchestra following him. Both ways work, and a choice would come down to a listener's individual taste. In terms of sound quality, all the recordings, with the exception of the Tchaikovsky with Karajan, will be a trial. In this remastering, the sound could generously be described as honest and direct and less generously as dull and opaque. It's possible to hear most but not all of what Richter is doing, and some but not most of what the orchestras are doing. Still, these are three of the greatest performances of these pieces ever recorded, and anyone sufficiently devoted to either the music or the pianist should by all means hear them.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/23/2010
  • Label: Supraphon
  • UPC: 099925401429
  • Catalog Number: 4014
  • Sales rank: 125,299

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1–3 Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor, Op. 23 - Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky & Karel Ancerl (33:00)
  2. 2 Piano Concerto No. 1 in D flat major, Op. 10 - Sergey Prokofiev & Karel Ancerl (13:43)
  3. 5–7 Concerto for harpsichord, strings & continuo No. 1 in D minor, BWV 1052 - Johann Sebastian Bach & Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (24:43)
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Vaclav Talich Primary Artist
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously