Tea at the Blue Lantern Inn: A Social History of the Tea Room Craze in America

Overview

The Gypsy Tea Kettle. Polly's Cheerio Tea Room. The Mad Hatter. The Blue Lantern Inn. These are just a few of the many tea rooms - most owned and operated by women — that popped up across America at the turn of the last century, and exploded into a full-blown craze by the 1920s. Colorful, cozy, festive, and inviting, these new-fangled eateries offered women a way to celebrate their independence and creativity. Sparked by the Suffragist movement, Prohibition, and the rise of the automobile, tea rooms forever ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $59.00   
  • New (3) from $105.45   
  • Used (4) from $59.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$105.45
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(42)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2002 Hardcover New New in new dust jacket. BRAND NEW. No remainder mark. Never opened. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 240 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: Bella Vista, AR

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$174.45
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(227)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$175.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The Gypsy Tea Kettle. Polly's Cheerio Tea Room. The Mad Hatter. The Blue Lantern Inn. These are just a few of the many tea rooms - most owned and operated by women — that popped up across America at the turn of the last century, and exploded into a full-blown craze by the 1920s. Colorful, cozy, festive, and inviting, these new-fangled eateries offered women a way to celebrate their independence and creativity. Sparked by the Suffragist movement, Prohibition, and the rise of the automobile, tea rooms forever changed the way America eats out, and laid the groundwork for the modern small restaurant and coffee bar.

In this lively, well-researched book, Jan Whitaker brings us back to the exciting days when countless American women dreamed of opening their own tea room - and many did. From the Bohemian streets of New York's Greenwich Village to the high-society tea rooms of Chicago's poshest hotels, from the Colonial roadside tea houses of New England to the welcoming bungalows of California, the book traces the social, artistic, and culinary changes the tea room helped bring about.

Anyone interested in women's history, the early days of the automobile, the Bohemian lives of artists in Greenwich Village, and the history of food and drink will revel in this spirited, stylish, and intimate slice of America's past.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Food writer Whitaker carves out a niche—a very small niche—in history: the rise and decline of the American tea-room during the first half of the 20th century. The boom in tea-rooms began in 1910 and ended in the '50s, when their image was fixed as a bastion of women's middle-class convention (think Schrafft's). Not so, says Whitaker. The upsurge in tea-rooms reflected profound social change. At the turn of the century, tea-rooms in hotels and department stores were among the few public places unescorted women could go for refreshment, and there were not many of them. By 1925, they had proliferated in cities, suburbs, and rural areas across the US. The author attributes this phenomenon to three developments: the rising independence of women, unsatisfied with their dining choices; the surge in automobile ownership, which made the country tea-room an attractive Sunday drive destination; and Prohibition, which put tea-rooms on a competitive basis with restaurants that could no longer serve liquor. The author examines menus and decor, designed for the most part by and for women and heavy on Colonial themes (fireplaces and spinning wheels). She also reports on subcategories of tea-rooms, including those in Greenwich Village, which boasted a bohemian atmosphere and unconventional hours. Roadside tea-rooms prided themselves on cleanliness and fresh food; in the cities, working women found tea-rooms a haven for lunch; on college campuses, they became student hangouts. Spinning-wheel motifs were superseded by sometimes outrageous whimsy as Russian and gypsy tea-rooms came into vogue. A support industry emerged, with college courses, trade magazines, and how-to books and articlesavailable for the tea-room entrepreneur. The author connects the dots between tea-rooms and social change, but the picture that emerges is a rough sketch, even for its limited audience. (8 pp. color photos, not seen; 85 b&w illustrations)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312290641
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/2002
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 7.45 (w) x 9.38 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Meet the Author

Jan Whitaker is a freelance writer and editor who writes about food and the history of American consumer culture. Her subjects have included fad diets, breakfast cereals, and women restaurateurs. She lives in Northampton, Massachusetts, where she has been collecting tea room memorabilia for over ten years.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2003

    A Cup of "Tea and Insight"

    Jan Whitaker takes a new and enthusiastic look at the women's movement of the early 20th Century - the fun side - women getting out, driving cars away from their homes and routines to get together and figure it all out. There's nothing delicate or dainty about this tell-it-like-it-is sociological study, a first of its kind in the field. The author presents in lay person's terms what was a new horizon for women, where the woman's touch began to infiltrate the hospitality industry and the rest of society. A thoroughly researched subject, a beautifully designed book, lots of detail and a great collection of historical pictures. "Tea at the Blue Lantern Inn" is tops!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2002

    Charming and Refreshing!

    With all the books on tea that have come out lately, it's amazing it took this long for anyone to do a book on the tea room, but it was worth the wait. Tea at the Blue Lantern Inn is a beautiful, witty and informative book. The illustrations are especially fine, with lots of rare advertising ephemera, great images from menus and signs, and historical photos. The anecdotes from the heyday of the tea room are especially delightful -- and often very funny. Combined with the illustrations and the wealth of detail woven into the "history" aspects of the book, these give a vivid portrait of the character of tea rooms and their proprietors. The number of prominent people in 20th century America who used to hang out in tea rooms is amazing. The book is ambitious in giving an overview of all kinds of tea rooms throughout the U.S., and it succeeds in convincing me that many things we now think of as normal in a good restaurant were innovations of tea rooms of the past.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)