Tea, Its Mystery And History

Tea, Its Mystery And History

by Samuel Phillips Day
     
 

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Written and published in London in 1878. (108 pages)

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text.

Contents.

Notes On The Chinese Language-----Extract From Mr. Lo Fong Loh's Journal-----Chapter I. Legendary

Overview

Written and published in London in 1878. (108 pages)

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text.

Contents.

Notes On The Chinese Language-----Extract From Mr. Lo Fong Loh's Journal-----Chapter I. Legendary Origin Of The Plant-----Chapter II. Introduction Of Tea Into England-----Chapter III. Appreciation Of The Leaf-----Chapter IV. The Plant Botanically Considered-----Chapter V. History Of The Tea Trade-----Chapter VI. The Coloring Of The Leaf-----Chapter VII. Social Character Of The Beverage-----Chapter VIII. The "Drink Of Health"-----Chapter IX. The Virtues Of The Leaf-----Chapter X. A Cup Of Tea

Excerpts:

.....ACCORDING to the most authentic Chinese historians, the Tea plant was introduced from the Corea in the eighth century, during the dynasty of Lyang. Being both approved of and much relished by the Emperor it was extensively cultivated, so that it rapidly became popular with all sections of the community. As this story was too prosaic for general acceptation, the masses, and even certain skeptical literati, readily received a more poetical account, which, like many of our own nursery tales, veils some political allegory.

.....The story runs, that in the year 510, an Indian prince one Darma, third son of King Kosjusva famed throughout the East for his religious zeal, landed in China on a Missionary enterprise. He devoted all his time and thought to the diffusion of a knowledge of God. In order to set an example of piety to others, he imposed on himself various privations and mortifications, forswore sleep, and, living mostly in the open air, devoted himself to prayer, preaching, and contemplation. However, after several years passed in this excessively austere manner, he involuntarily fell asleep. Upon awaking, so distressed was he at having violated his oath that, to prevent a repetition of such backsliding and never again permit "tired eyelids" to "rest on tired eyes," he cutoff those offending portions of his body, and flung them on the ground. Returning next day to the same spot, he discovered that his eyelids had undergone a strange metamorphosis, having been changed into a shrub the like of which had never before been seen upon the earth. Having eaten some of the leaves, he found his spirits singularly exhilarated thereby; while his former vigor was restored. Hence he recommended the newly-discovered boon to his disciples and followers, so that after a time the use of Tea rapidly spread. A portrait of Darma is given by Kæmpfu, the first authoritative writer on China. At the foot of the portrait is the representation of a reed, supposed to be indicative of the religious enthusiast having crossed rivers and seas in the pursuit of his mission. It is by no means difficult, out of this wonderful legend, to extract a moral, namely, that an earnest individual, who had acquired the useful habit of keeping his eyes open, discovered one of Nature's secrets, which had entirely escaped the observation of all others.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012324368
Publisher:
Digital Text Publishing Company
Publication date:
04/03/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
108
File size:
36 KB

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