Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56

( 50 )

Overview

The fifth-graders inside are either immigrants or children of immigrants; most live in poverty and few speak English as their first language. They also play Vivaldi, perform unabridged plays by Shakespeare, and go on to attend the finest universities in the country. Rafe Esquith is the teacher who helps them achieve these accomplishments. And this extraordinary bestselling book is his gift to all those who care about our children's future: a detailed, unforgettable guide to turning kids on to the wonder of ...
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Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56

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Overview

The fifth-graders inside are either immigrants or children of immigrants; most live in poverty and few speak English as their first language. They also play Vivaldi, perform unabridged plays by Shakespeare, and go on to attend the finest universities in the country. Rafe Esquith is the teacher who helps them achieve these accomplishments. And this extraordinary bestselling book is his gift to all those who care about our children's future: a detailed, unforgettable guide to turning kids on to the wonder of learning, the power of the imagination, and the wealth of finding oneself.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Rafe Esquith teaches fifth grade in Los Angeles, but his fame stretches far beyond his Hobart Elementary class of first-generation immigrants. He has been honored by Oprah Winfrey and Dalai Lama; he's won the American Teacher Award; Sir Ian McKellen calls him "my only hero"; and he is the only teacher to be awarded the National Medal of the Arts. What makes him so special? Teach Like Your Hair's On Fire! not only answers that question; it gives a jump-start to any teacher or parent who cares.
Publishers Weekly
Esquith might be the only public school teacher to be honored by both Oprah Winfrey and the Dalai Lama; he is the only school teacher ever to receive the president's National Medal of the Arts. For the past 25 years, Esquith has taught fifth graders at Hobart Elementary in central Los Angeles. Like most progressive educators, Esquith is outraged by the tyranny of testing, the scripting of teaching under "No Child Left Behind" and the overwhelming bureaucratization of the education industry. Still, he's done wonders with the basic curriculum developing a hands-on arts program, a money-management curriculum and a sports-based statistics unit. Esquith and his Hobart Shakespeareans are world famous for the rock opera they create every year. Throughout each school day, Esquith teaches life skills: how to think about problems, how to plan a strategy to solve them and, most important, how to work together and be nice to each other. While his goals are inspiring, he's also practical most chapters include affordable, how-to directions for a variety of his most effective classroom activities; he's even got a few tips for revamping those inescapable "test prep" sessions. (Jan.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
The winner of numerous teaching awards and the only instructor to have been given the National Medal of the Arts, Esquith explains how he helps kids from the lowest rungs of society climb to the top. With an eight-city tour. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
BACKCOVER: Praise for Rafe Esquith:

“Rafe Esquith is my only hero.”—Sir Ian McKellan

“Politicians, burbling over how to educate the underclass, would do well to stop by Rafe Esquith’s fifth grade class as it mounts its annual Shakespeare play. Sound like a grind? Listen to the peals of laughter bouncing off the classroom walls.”—Time

“Esquith is a modern-day Thoreau, preaching the value of good work, honest self-reflection, and the courage to go one’s own way.”—Newsday

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143112860
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/18/2007
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 65,613
  • Product dimensions: 5.11 (w) x 7.77 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Rafe Esquith
Rafe Esquith has taught at Hobart Elementary School for twenty-two years. He is the only teacher in history to receive the National Medal of Arts. He has also been made a Member of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth. His many other honors include the American Teacher Award, Parents magazine’s As You Grow Award, Oprah Winfrey’s Use Your Life Award, and the Compassion in Action Award from the Dalai Lama. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Barbara Tong.

Read CBS's news story on Rafe Esquith.
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Read an Excerpt

TEACH LIKE YOUR
HAIR’S ON FIRE

ALSO BY RAFE ESQUITH

There Are No Shortcuts

TEACH LIKE YOUR
HAIR’S ON FIRE

Prologue: Fire in the Classroom

PART ONE: THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

ONE:Gimme Some Truth

TWO:Searching for Level VI

PART TWO: THE METHOD

THREE:Reading for Life

FOUR:Writing

FIVE:Add It Up

SIX:We Won’t Get Fooled Again

SEVEN:What a Wonderful World

EIGHT:Rocket Man

NINE:Art Lover

TEN:Put Me In, Coach

ELEVEN:Taxman

PART THREE: THE MADNESS

TWELVE:Think for Yourself

THIRTEEN:Celluloid Heroes

FOURTEEN:Goin’ Mobile

FIFTEEN:It’s Only Rock ’n’ Roll (but I Like It)

SIXTEEN:Do They Know It’s Christmas?

SEVENTEEN:Will Power

EPILOGUE:Rest in Peace

Acknowledgments

Appendixes

PROLOGUE

Fire in the Classroom

It is a strange feeling to write this book. I am painfully aware that I am not superhuman. I do the same job as thousands of other dedicated teachers who try to make a difference. Like all real teachers, I fail constantly. I don’t get enough sleep. I lie awake in the early-morning hours, agonizing over a kid I was unable to reach. Being a teacher can be painful.

For almost a quarter of a century, I have spent the majority of my time in a tiny, leaky classroom in central Los Angeles. Because of a little talent and a lot of luck, I have been fortunate to receive some recognition for my work. Not a day goes by when I do not feel overwhelmed by the attention.

I doubt that any book can truly capture the Hobart Shakespeareans. However, it is certainly possible to share some of the things I’ve learned over the years that have helped me grow as a teacher, parent, and person. For almost twelve hours a day, six days a week, forty-eight weeks a year, my fifth-graders and I are crowded into our woefully insufficient space, immersed in a world of Shakespeare, algebra, and rock ’n’ roll. For the rest of the year, the kids and I are on the road. While my wife believes me to be eccentric, good friends of mine have not been so gentle, going as far as to label me quixotic at best and certifiable at worst.

I don’t claim to have all the answers; at times it doesn’t feel as if I’m reaching as many students as I succeed with. I’m here only to share some of the ideas I have found useful. Some of them are just plain common sense, and others touch on insanity. But there is a method to this madness. It is my hope that some parents and teachers out there will agree with me that our culture is a disaster. In a world that considers athletes and pop stars more important than research scientists and firefighters, it has become practically impossible to develop kind and brilliant individuals. And yet we’ve created a different world in Room 56. It’s a world where character matters, hard work is respected, humility is valued, and support for one another is unconditional. Perhaps when parents and teachers see this, and realize that my students and I are nothing special, they will get a few ideas and take heart.

I am sad when I see so many good teachers and parents surrender to forces that sap their potential excellence. The demons are everywhere. Those who care deeply often feel outgunned by apathetic or incompetent administrators and politicians. Expectations for children are often ridiculously low. Racism, poverty, and ignorance often reign supreme on campus. Add to this mix ungrateful students, and even mean-spirited people in the teaching profession itself, and the hardiest of souls can be crushed. Each defeat usually means that a child’s true potential will not be developed.

I was fortunate to have a ridiculous moment in the classroom that literally lit my way out of the darkness. Years ago, feeling tired and frustrated, I spent a few weeks searching my soul and did something I rarely do—I questioned whether teaching was worth it anymore. A combination of the aforementioned demons had beaten me down, and I was practically down for the count.

But for some reason, when I was guilty of feeling sorry for myself, I spent a day paying extra attention to a kid in class whom I liked very much. She was one of those kids who always seem to be the last one picked for the team, a quiet girl who appeared to have accepted the idea that she could never be special. I was determined to convince her that she was wrong.

I was teaching a chemistry lesson, and the students were excited about working with alcohol lamps. But the girl couldn’t get her wick to burn. The rest of the class wanted to move on with their projects, but I told everyone to wait. I was not going to leave her behind, even after she told me to continue with the others and not worry about her.

Normally I do not interfere with science projects, because failure can be part of the learning process. Yet this was simply a matter of faulty equipment; it had nothing to do with the chemical principle we were exploring that morning. I needed to step in. The girl had tears in her eyes, and I felt ashamed of myself for ever having felt like giving up. Suddenly her sadness was all that mattered.

Athletes often refer to getting “into the zone” when they forget about the crowd and the pressure and see only the ball. It can happen in other fields too. For that one moment, the only thing that mattered to me was that this girl should have a successful experiment. She was going to go home that day with a smile on her face. I bent closely over the wick of her alcohol lamp. For some reason the wick was not as long as it should have been—I could barely see it. I leaned as close as I could, and with a long kitchen match tried to reach it. I was so close to the match that I could feel the flame as I tried to ignite the lamp. I was determined to get the lamp working. And it started working! The wick caught fire, and I looked up triumphantly to see the smile I expected on the girl’s face.

Instead, she took one look at me and began screaming in fear. Other kids started yelling as well. I did not understand why they were all pointing at me, until I realized that while I was lighting the lamp, the flame had touched my hair; it was now smoldering and scaring the hell out of the children. Several of them ran to me and swiped at my head. Talk about a dream come true—they got to hit their teacher on the head and say they were trying to help him.

A few minutes later, all was well and the experiment proceeded. I felt (and looked) like an idiot. And yet for the first time in weeks, I felt great about being a teacher. I had been able to ignore the crap that all teachers on the front lines face. I had done everything I could to help someone. I didn’t do it particularly well, but the effort was there. I thought to myself that if I could care so much about teaching that I didn’t even realize my hair was burning, I was moving in the right direction. From that moment, I resolved to always teach like my hair was on fire.

There are so many charlatans in the world of education. They teach for a couple of years, come up with a few clever slogans, build their Web sites, and hit the lecture circuit. In this fast-food society, simple solutions to complex problems are embraced far too often. We can do better. I hope that people who read this book realize that true excellence takes sacrifice, mistakes, and enormous amounts of effort. After all, there are no shortcuts.

PART ONE

THERE’S NO PLACE
LIKE HOME

How Room 56 Creates a Safe Haven,
and Provides Children with
Shelter from the Storm

ONE

Gimme Some Truth

The parents want one of the teachers arrested. I have been summoned from my room by a mother who has known me for years. Some of the parents are demanding that the teacher be fired. I listen to their complaints and try to calm them down. I do the best I can to defend the teacher with whom they are furious, but it isn’t easy.

Alex is a third-grader with a messy backpack. In fact, it’s more than messy—it’s a virtual nuclear holocaust of crumpled-up papers, folders, and candy. Here’s an opportunity for his teacher to teach him something valuable. Instead, he began by yelling at Alex and dumping his backpack all over his desk in full view of his peers. Then he called on a student to go to his car and retrieve a camera. He took a picture of the mess and told Alex that he would hang it up during Back-to-School Night to show all the parents what a slob he was. Then the teacher added the final touch: He told Alex’s classmates that for the rest of the day, when they had trash to discard, it should be thrown on Alex’s desk instead of in the garbage can.

Now the boy’s parents are in my room demanding that the authorities be called.

After enormous effort, I calm them down and beg them to let our principal handle the situation. The teacher must be given the chance to explain his actions, although it’s clear that if his behavior was as cruel and humiliating as it sounds, no explanation can justify it.

Days later, after several meetings with the principal, the young teacher emerges from the office, face tear-stained and posture slumped with contrition. Yet he comes to me and bitterly defends himself. “But I’m right. It worked…Alex’s backpack is neater now.” And I realize the real tragedy here is that the teacher has missed a terrific opportunity. He had a chance to help Alex learn the value of organization and become a better student. Instead, he forever marked himself as a cruel ogre to Alex and his classmates. It would take months to undo the harm of such a moment, and the teacher did not even comprehend the damage he had done.

The larger problem here is that many teachers are so desperate to keep their classrooms in order that they will do anything to maintain it. This is understandable—an “End justifies the means” mentality is at the heart of many explanations of how children are handled these days. Given some of the practically impossible situations confronting teachers today, it seems reasonable.

But let’s be honest. It might be explicable. It might be effective. But it is not good teaching. We can do better.

I know this because I’ve been there. I’ve fallen into the same trap. The simple truth is that most classrooms today are managed by one thing and one thing only: fear.

The teacher is afraid: afraid of looking bad, of not being liked, of not being listened to, of losing control. The students are even more afraid: afraid of being scolded and humiliated, of looking foolish in front of peers, of getting bad grades, of facing their parents’ wrath. John Lennon got it right in “Working Class Hero” when he sang of being “tortured and scared…for twenty-odd years.”

This is the issue that overshadows all others in the world of education. It is the matter of classroom management.

If your class is not in order, nothing good will follow. There will be no learning. The kids will not read, write, or calculate better. Children will not improve their critical thinking. Character cannot be built. Good citizenship will not be fostered.

There is more than one way to run a successful classroom—from using the philosophy of Thoreau to the philosophy of Mussolini. Over the last twenty-five years, I’ve tried practically everything to deal with the often maddening behavior of children in a school environment that accepts graffiti-covered walls and urine-soaked bathroom floors as normal.

Visitors to Room 56 never come away most impressed with the academic ability of the children, the style in which I present lessons, or the cleverness of the wall decorations. They come away shaking their heads over something else: the culture of the classroom. It’s calm. It is incredibly civil. It’s an oasis. But something is missing. Ironically, Room 56 is a special place not because of what it has, but because of what it is missing: fear.

In my early years, I actually planned to frighten the kids the first day of school. I wanted to make sure they knew I was boss. Some of my colleagues did the same, and we shared our supposed successes in getting the kids in order. Other classes were out of control, and we foolishly congratulated one another on our quiet classrooms, orderly children, and smooth-running days.

Then one day, many years ago, I watched a fantastic video featuring a first-rate special education teacher who told a story about his son and the Boston Red Sox. He had inherited a priceless baseball signed by all the players of the legendary 1967 Sox. When his young son asked to play catch with him, of course he warned the boy that they could never use that ball. Upon being asked why, the teacher realized that Carl Yastrzemski, Jim Lonborg, and the rest of the 1967 Sox meant nothing to his son. Instead of taking the time to explain, however, he simply told the boy they could not use the ball “because it had writing all over it.”

A few days later, the boy once again asked his father to play catch. When his father reminded him that they could not use the ball with the writing, his little boy informed him that he had solved the problem: He had licked off all the writing!

Of course the father was ready to kill his own son. On second thought, however, he realized his boy had done nothing wrong. And from that day forward, the teacher carried the unsigned baseball with him everywhere he went. It reminded him that, when teaching or parenting, you must always try to see things from the child’s point of view and never use fear as a shortcut for education.

Painful though it was, I had to admit that many children in my class were behaving the way they were because they were afraid. Oh, lots of kids liked the class and quite a few learned all sorts of wonderful lessons. But I wanted more. We spend so much time trying to raise reading and math scores. We push our kids to run faster and jump higher. Shouldn’t we also try to help them become better human beings? In fact, all these years later, I’ve recognized that by improving the culture of my classroom, the ordinary challenges are navigated far more easily. It’s not easy to create a classroom without fear. It can take years. But it’s worth it. Here are four things I do to ensure the class remains a place of academic excellence without resorting to fear to keep the kids in line.

Replace Fear with Trust

On the first day of school, within the first two minutes, I discuss this issue with the children. While most classrooms are based on fear, our classroom is based on trust. The children hear the words and like them, but they are only words. It is deeds that will help the children see that I not only talk the talk but walk the walk.

I use the following example with the students on their first day. Most of us have participated in the trust exercise in which one person falls back and is caught by a peer. Even if the catch is made a hundred times in a row, the trust is broken forever if the friend lets you fall the next time as a joke. Even if he swears he is sorry and will never let you fall again, you can never fall back without a seed of doubt. My students learn the first day that a broken trust is irreparable. Everything else can be fixed. Miss your homework assignment? Just tell me, accept the fact that you messed up, and we move on. Did you break something? It happens; we can take care of it. But break my trust and the rules change. Our relationship will be okay, but it will never, ever be what it once was. Of course kids do break trust, and they should be given an opportunity to earn it back. But it takes a long time. The kids are proud of the trust I give them, and they do not want to lose it. They rarely do, and I make sure on a daily basis that I deserve the trust I ask of them.

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Table of Contents

Teach Like Your Hair's On FirePrologue: Fire in the Classroom

Part One: There's No Place Like Home

One: Gimme Some Truth
Two: Searching for Level VI

Part Two: The Method

Three: Reading for Life
Four: Writing
Five: Add It Up
Six: We Won't Get Fooled Again
Seven: What a Wonderful World
Eight: Rocket Man
Nine: Art Lover
Ten: Put Me In, Coach
Eleven: Taxman

Part Three: The Madness

Twelve: Think for Yourself
Thirteen: Celluloid Heroes
Fourteen: Goin' Mobile
Fifteen: It's Only Rock 'n' Roll (but I Like It)
Sixteen: Do They Know It's Christmas?
Seventeen: Will Power

Epilogue: Rest in Peace

Acknowledgments
Appendixes

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(31)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 26, 2010

    An inspiring, must read novel!

    This is an inspiring book by Rafe Esquith that I would recommend it for any teacher; young or old, new or tenured, elementary or secondary. I would even recommend it for any parent or soon to be parent, because in a way, Rafe Esquith raises his students in room 56. I would also recommend it for any person who enjoys reading, just in general, about great and inspiring people. People who set their lives out in front of them, take it for all it is worth, and try to change the world in whatever way they can.
    The reason I decided to pick up this book and begin reading was because the college I attend had an opportunity for me to go and see him. I go to Illinois State University, where you will find that among the business majors, the engineering majors, and the pre-med majors, the majority of the students you will encounter here are education majors of all sorts. So having a teacher, who he himself has won the Oprah Winfrey Angel award, Oprah Winfrey's $100,000 "Use Your Life Award", Parents Magazine's "As You Grow Award", the Disney National Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award, a Sigma Beta Delta Fellowship from John Hopkins University, and was made an honorary member of the Order of the British Empire, coming here was, I felt, quite the opportunity.
    While there, I heard one of the most inspiring speeches I have ever heard. Where he works, to give a quick summary of what you will quickly find out in the beginning of the novel anyway, is in a poor LA neighborhood, where for most of the students, English is a second language. His students willingly come to school, almost year round. The doors of his classroom, room 56, open at 6 AM for any student who wants to come (and several do) and has lots of after school activities in his room till 6 PM, where many students stay. He changes their lives, and in order to find out more, this is where I must leave you, to buy the book for yourself, and see how one man, can indeed, changes the world.
    As repeated, throughout the book as a saying in room 56 for the students to always remember to work hard to achieve their dreams, "After all, there are no shortcuts."~Rafe Esquith

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2009

    The perfect teacher

    I loved the book and what Rafe Esquith does with his students but found it to be very unrealistic. As a teacher myself, a wife, mother, daughter, friend of many, I could never devote the time and money to any job that claims to do. The field trips across the U. S. were great learning experiences but leaving students unsupervised in hotel rooms is a risk to student safety and personal liability I would not take with the most trusted of students. Through the minute details of his techniques and criticisms of other teachers, he has violated the creeds he has asked his students to live by. His derogatory nicknames for teachers he does not respect is especially disturbing. I am sure his students, past and present, would read his books and pick up on this unkindness. Even if he has altered some of the events and changed names, teachers from his school would surely figure out that he was talking about them. As much as I admire his love for students, I find many contradictions to his philosophy. If I tried to do as much as he claims to do, my marriage would dissolve and family life would dissolve for lack of time and attention. I spend lots of money on my teaching activities but would not want to give up my family life to take on extra jobs and recruit for funds. The book is well-written and enjoyable.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2010

    Teaching like your hair's on fire.

    When one is looking on a nonfiction book to read that has to deal with the field of education Rafe Esquith's book Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56 is an excellent choice! Being an Oklahoma State University Composition student for 2010 I was given the task of finding an nonfiction book dealing with my major or career related. Stubbling across several books of Rafe Esquith I found Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire to be the most interesting after reading the first few pages. Esquith does an excellent job at listing how-to instruction with a few of his projects/activities he has found to be very benefical, in the class room. Throughout Esquith book he discusses the important of instilling life long lesson along side of teaching the basic curriculum. Therefore, if you are looking for a book to gain knowledge of the insight of the daily operations of a class room or looking for a good book to read I highly suggest to read Rafe Esquith's Teach Like You Hair's on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56.

    Felica

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 7, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful, Inspiring, Practical

    I happened to pick this book up while looking for a gift for a friend in her first year of teaching. I was riveted by the end of the first page and read the first few chapters before purchasing it for my friend.

    A year later, in the midst of my own first year of teaching, I remembered how inspired I was by just a few pages of Rafe's book, and bought a copy for myself.

    I have since given and lent this book to other teacher and tutor friends, and we all love it. Besides being chock-full of great practical teaching ideas and lesson plans, I am attracted to how he encourages his readers. He tells teachers, tutors, and mentors to not give up; yes, the education system in California is broken; yes, the cards are stacked against us; but do not give up. Our students - the future - are a worthwhile cause.

    This book (and this author) will be an inspiration to anyone who invests in others.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2010

    A Must Read for Every Teacher and Parent

    The author, Rafe Esquith, is a true hero. I have read all 3 of his books and would recommend them all, however, this is probably the best of the three. It just confirms that we, as parents and teachers simply need to do and expect more. It is very inspirational and will give you ideas on ways to do more with your own children. I also purchased a copy for my son's fourth grade teacher. The books are all easy reads and very enjoyable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2014

    every teacher should read this book

    This method of traching is a mix of faciliator and executive approaches. This teaches future teachers not to be afraid and everyone makes mistakes even the best, but you learn form them and become greater than before.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2012

    Great Ideas

    This book is very thoughtful and give great hints as to find information to utilize new ideas. It is an excellent book for new teachers, and a great refresher course for those who are old hats at the expansion of the mind job.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2012

    Great book with great ideas!

    I definitely learned a lot an got a lot of ideas for my classroom from this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2011

    Good book very inspirational

    Teachers of all experience levels can appreciate this book. Offers neat ideas (most easy to implement).

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  • Posted May 20, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Very Practical

    I appreciated the practical usefulness of this book. He's full of ideas, calls it like it is (ex: doesn't hesitate to call the lazy teachers out for using films as a replacement for learning), and encourages excellence. So, it's inspiring in a practical sort of way--he's got lots of ideas about how to use art and film in constructive ways. I've actually implemented some of his ideas, some to good end, some not. But it's fun to experiment.

    For deeper inspiration for teachers, I'd also recommend the classic, The Courage to Teach and the newer book, Buddha in the Classroom; Zen Wisdom to Inspire Teachers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire

    As a teacher, this book inspired me to look at teaching in a whole new perspective. I feel I will be a better teacher after reading this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 25, 2009

    Good Read For Educators

    Rafe Esquith is the teacher of the Hobart Shakespeareans. They have received international acclaim for their deep and abiding love for learning and working well as a group of learners. These children move on to grade 6 and new students arrive each year so Rafe has to begin again every September. This is a great book for teachers of school age children as it leads you along Rafe's journey and gives you new insights into teaching all children with respect and confidence.

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  • Posted July 5, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Path-Breaking

    Required reading for all who are truly interested in education: parents, teachers, would-be teachers, and especially school administrators.

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  • Posted June 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Parents, Teachers, Others Involved in Education? Read this book

    Rafe Esquith is an intelligent hardworking teacher who is uniquely motivated. He is a workaholic and fortunately strongly supported by his wife and family. His story shows how one person (teacher) can make a huge difference in many young lives. His influence has guided 20 plus years worth of students through an inner city elementary school he refers to as the jungle; many of his students have become university graduates who are highly productive intelligent members of society. He leads by example arriving at school by 6:30am and staying until 6:00pm, using a motto of "Be nice. Work hard." to instill trust and teach his students a strong work ethic. Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire offers many ideas for novice and experienced teachers alike that will help raise them and their students out of the mediocrity of public schooling.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2009

    Help instill the joy of learning in more students life. . . READ THIS BOOK

    Being an OSU Comp Student 2009, I have thoroughly enjoyed reading Rafe Esquith's book on being an educator because I hope to be a teacher in a couple of years. The enticing title and informative information in the book have impacted my thought process on how I want to develop my classroom when I become a teacher. By learning these techniques, I personally have discovered the value and significance of every move that a teacher makes. Every move a teacher makes the student is watching and will judge the teacher by their actions. The book, Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire, is a phenomenal book for any teacher or professional who is in need of a different aspect for their classroom or who doubt the work teachers put into their jobs.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2007

    A most amazing author and teacher!!

    This is a must read for all parents and teachers!! I couldn't put this book down. I was able to find an email for the author and he spent 30 minutes with me on the phone helping me apply his principles to my younger children. I am a home school mom and was looking for things to keep my lessons fun and interesting. He defiinitely paved the way for me. Thanks, Rafe!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2007

    A reviewer

    Teach Like Your Hair is On Fire was absolutely wonderful. The teacher in the story is giving his all to these kids so creatively and with such concern for their character. I finished this book in one day and immediately bought it for two teachers I know. You will enjoy the roller-coaster of emotions as Rafe Esquith integrates art, music, travel and Shakespeare into his instruction of 9 and 10 year olds.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2007

    It is so insteresing it made me stay up late to finish it!

    I am a teacher and an avid reader. Mr. Esquith's book is outstanding. There are so many reasons I enjoyed it but one of the primary reasons is he discusses math, science, reading, P.E. and the other 'Core' classes individually. I emailed our English faculty and everyone is reading this book. Today I ordered his other book and I just can hardly wait until it arrives.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2007

    A Book of Inspiration and Ideas from the ¿Hobart Shakespeareans¿ Teacher

    During our teaching careers, most of us have experienced a few ¿Ah-ha¿ moments. For Rafe Esquith, his wake-up call was literally when his hair caught on fire during a science experiment. Why was he the last one in the class to realize his head was ablaze - because he had inadvertently reached classroom nirvana. I think of it as being in the zone, Esquith labels it ¿ignoring the crap,¿ either way, this gifted teacher had a transcendental moment that altered his educational philosophy forever and his influence is rapidly spreading into classrooms across the globe. Part quixotic and possibly part ¿mad,¿ he has transformed his 5th grade class, of mainly ESL students, into Shakespeare-quoting individuals who have learned how to take charge of their own learning. Esquith¿s book challenges such issues as the obsession with high-stakes testing, unresponsive administrators, ineffective professional development opportunities, and the ¿demons¿ that take away our energy and spirit. At the heart of his ¿cookbook¿ is getting students to take responsibility for their actions and to value failure as an integral part of the learning process. Check out this book because it explores the realities of teaching difficult students, as opposed to your typical educational book of impractical theories. Pick up this book if you agree with his classroom motto of, 'Be nice, work hard. There are no shortcuts.' Finally, purchase this book if the biggest fear for your students is that they become ordinary. Lastly, what really motivated me to buy this book was that Esquith hasn¿t been lured out of the classroom. Instead, he continues to embrace his mission of finding the different keys it takes to ignite each of his students.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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