Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days

Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days

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by Jesse Liberty
     
 

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The proven, best-selling elements of the Teach Yourself series and the immense popularity of the C++ programming language make Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days, Second Edition the most efficient way to learn programming with C++. And since it doesn't focus on any one particular compiler, it allows the reader to jump from one compiler to another.
  • Teaches the

Overview

The proven, best-selling elements of the Teach Yourself series and the immense popularity of the C++ programming language make Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days, Second Edition the most efficient way to learn programming with C++. And since it doesn't focus on any one particular compiler, it allows the reader to jump from one compiler to another.

  • Teaches the basic of Object-Oriented Programming with C++
  • Completely revised to ANSI standards
  • Can be used with any of the C++ compilers on the market

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This guide is designed to teach the basics of C++ programming language to beginners using the familiar one-a-day chapter format. The chapters carry the reader through the history of the program and its basic anatomy, and into variables and constants, expressions and statements, functions, object-oriented programming, looping, pointers, references, and advanced functions<-->including the default constructor and operator overloading, object-oriented analysis and design, inheritance, arrays and linked lists, polymorphism, streams, namespaces, templates, exceptions and error handling. Liberty has published numerous guides to C++. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672310706
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
05/28/1997
Edition description:
2ND
Pages:
792
Product dimensions:
7.34(w) x 9.07(h) x 1.92(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Getting Started

Introduction

Welcome to Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days! Today you will get started on your way to becoming a proficient C++ programmer.

Today you will learn

  • Why C++ is the emerging standard in software development.
  • The steps to develop a C++ program.
  • How to enter, compile, and link your first working C++ program.

A Brief History of C++

Computer languages have undergone dramatic evolution since the first electronic computers were built to assist in artillery trajectory calculations during World War II. Early on, programmers worked with the most primitive computer instructions: machine language. These instructions were represented by long strings of ones and zeros. Soon. assemblers were invented to nap machine instructions to human-readable and -manageable mnemonics, such as ADD and MOV.

In time, higher-level languages evolved, such as BASIC and COBOL. These languages let people work with something approximating words and sentences, such as Let I = 100. These instructions were translated back into machine language by interpreters and compilers.

An interpreter translates a program as it reads it, turning the program instructions, or code, directly into actions. A compiler translates the code into an intermediary form. This step is called compiling, and it produces an object file. The compiler then invokes a linker, which turns the object file into an executable program.

Because interpreters read the code as it is written and execute the code on the spot, interpreters are easy for the programmer to work with. Today, most interpreted programs are referred to as scripts, and the interpreter itself is often called a Script Engine.

Some languages, such as Visual Basic, call the interpreter the runtime library. .lava calls its runtime interpreter a Virtual Machine (VM), but in this case the VM is provided by the browser (such as Internet Explorer or Netscape).

Compilers introduce the extra steps of compiling the source code (which is readable by humans) into object code (which is readable by machines). This extra step is inconvenient, but compiled programs run very fast because the time-consuming task of translating the source code into machine language is done once (at compile time) and is not required when you execute the program. Another advantage of many compiled languages such as C++ is that you can distribute the executable program to people who don't have the compiler. With an interpreted ]an

For many years, the principal goal of computer programmers was to write short pieces of code that would execute quickly. The program needed to be small because memory was expensive, and it needed to be fast because processing power was also expensive. As computers have become smaller, cheaper, and faster, and as the cost of memory has fallen, these priorities have changed. Today the cost of a programmers time far outweighs the cost of most of the computers in use by businesses. Well-written, easy-to-maintain code is at a premium. Easy to maintain means that as business requirements change, the program can be extended and enhanced without great expense...

Meet the Author

Jesse Liberty is the author of a dozen books on C++, C# and object-oriented analysis and design. He is president of Liberty Associates, Inc. (http: / /www. LibertyAssociates. com), where he provides .net development, contract programming, mentoring, consulting, and training.

Jesse was a distinguished software engineer at AT&T, a software architect for Xerox and LinkNet (PBS), and vice president of Citibank's Development Division. He lives with his wife, Stacey, and his daughters, Robin and Rachel, in the suburbs of Cambridge, Massachusetts. He supports his books on his Web site at http://www.libertyassociates.com-click on Books and Resources.

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Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't recommend this book unless u have previous programming knowledge.