Teach Yourself VISUALLY Dreamweaver CS3

Teach Yourself VISUALLY Dreamweaver CS3

3.3 3
by Janine Warner
     
 
Are you a visual learner? Do you prefer instructions that show you how to do something — and skip the long-winded explanations? If so, then this book is for you. Open it up and you'll find clear, step-by-step screen shots that show you how to tackle more than 150 Dreamweaver CS3 tasks. Each task-based spread includes easy, visual directions for performing

Overview

Are you a visual learner? Do you prefer instructions that show you how to do something — and skip the long-winded explanations? If so, then this book is for you. Open it up and you'll find clear, step-by-step screen shots that show you how to tackle more than 150 Dreamweaver CS3 tasks. Each task-based spread includes easy, visual directions for performing necessary operations, including:

  • Setting up a new Web site
  • Exploring dynamic HTML
  • Creating complex designs with CSS
  • Using hyperlinks to navigate
  • Publishing and maintaining sites
  • Building database-driven Web sites
  • Helpful sidebars offer practical tips and tricks
  • Full-color screen shots demonstrate each task
  • Succinct explanations walk you through step by step
  • Two-page lessons break big topics into bite-sized modules

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470144756
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
08/06/2007
Series:
Teach Yourself VISUALLY (Tech) Series, #4
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.15(h) x 0.64(d)

Meet the Author

Janine Warner's expertise in media, technology, and cross-cultural business has taken her on consulting assignments from Miami to Mexico and speaking engagements from New York to New Delhi.
Since 1996, she has authored more than a dozen books about the Internet, including Creating Family Web Sites For Dummies and the best-selling Dreamweaver For Dummies (now in its sixth edition).
Her success as an author attracted the attention of Total Training, Inc., a pioneer in innovative video-based training, where she was first contracted in 2005 to host a video called Total Training for Dreamweaver CS2. Her first video won two industry awards and she is now working on a series of Web design videos that includes Advanced Dreamweaver CS3.
An award-winning journalist, her articles and columns have appeared in a variety of publications, including The Miami Herald, Shape Magazine, and the Pulitzer Prizewinning Point Reyes Light newspaper. She also writes a regular column on Dreamweaver for Layers Magazine.
Janine has taught online journalism at the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and the University of Miami. In 1998, she joined The Miami Herald as Online Managing Editor. A year later, she was promoted to Director of New Media. She left that position to serve as Director of Latin American Operations for CNET Networks, an international technology media company.
Since 2001, Warner has run her own business as a writer, speaker, and consultant. She earned a degree in journalism and Spanish from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and spent the first several years of her career in Northern California as a reporter and editor. She lives with her husband in Los Angeles.

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3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Warner takes a reader through an easy tour of Dreamweaver CS3. No previous exposure to it is needed. An added bonus, which is made clear by the narrative, is that you also do not need much background in knowing HTML. To some people who have never dealt with HTML, it can be daunting. What Dreamweaver does is make the composition of an HTML web page as painless as possible. Typically, much of the book shows how to write a page in WYSIWIG. What you see is what you get. Click-driven and drag and drop. The grubby details of writing or inserting the appropriate HTML tags are largely (and thankfully!) hidden by Dreamweaver. So, for example, you can make line breaks in text, indent paragraphs, make ordered lists, and change text and page colours. All without explicitly editing HTML tags. There are a few sections where you get to see (and edit) the raw HTML. Perhaps skip these on a first reading. With some experience in writing your first pages in Dreamweaver, you can later return to these. The last chapter is definitely the most advanced. Talking about putting a database behind your website. The discussion is accurate. But it is only an introduction to the topic. For any realistic website with a database, consult a book devoted to the subject. Warner's writing touches on a few highlights. Enough to perhaps let you appreciate the complexities.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago