Teacher Beliefs And Full Participation In Whole School Reform

Overview

The research seeks to identify and determine if there is a connection between, personal and educational beliefs and teacher participation in whole school reform. Though a successful reform overall, it is still important to look at the phenomenon within the reform, of some teachers not participating fully. Data empirically demonstrates that the high school under investigation is not fulfilling its academic mission. Historically, less then 50 percent of the original freshmen class graduated from the four-year high ...
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Overview

The research seeks to identify and determine if there is a connection between, personal and educational beliefs and teacher participation in whole school reform. Though a successful reform overall, it is still important to look at the phenomenon within the reform, of some teachers not participating fully. Data empirically demonstrates that the high school under investigation is not fulfilling its academic mission. Historically, less then 50 percent of the original freshmen class graduated from the four-year high school program. In September 2002, nearly one third of the freshman class had earned the required credits to progress to the tenth grade. Despite the evidence of student underachievement, some teachers were not participating fully in whole school reform. The research determines that there is a connection between personal and educational beliefs that act as barriers when action-driven school reform enters the school environment and identifies those beliefs including beliefs derived from past experiences, the school, the students, and the reform. Additional beliefs are identified concerning the reform and the teachers' role in schools, time constraints, student benefits, and reform vs. society. Qualitative research methods within the phenomenological genre are chosen to identify and describe the complex social phenomena of teacher beliefs. Participant interviews and a personal education inventory profile are used to gather data. The reform, in its sixth year at the time of the interviews is divided into an initial phase, middle phase, and later phase for data analysis. When looking through the lens of the six non-participating teachers/research participants at that moment in time, data reveals that there is a connection between teacher beliefs and participation in whole school reform and the identified beliefs act as barriers to their participation. Additional findings and identified beliefs central to the study include change in school was not the teacher's responsibility, involvement in school activities was not a predictor of engagement in reform activities, positive and/or negative peer pressure plays a role in supporting teacher participation decisions, and the non-participating teachers assumes no responsibility for their perceived lack of reform results.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781243643841
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/6/2011
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.47 (d)

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