×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Teaching Contemporary Theory to Undergraduates
     

Teaching Contemporary Theory to Undergraduates

by Dianne F. Sadoff (Editor), William E. Cain (Editor)
 

See All Formats & Editions

Teaching Contemporary Theory to Undergraduates shows readers how theory can, in the words of William E. Cain, enable teachers and students "to illuminate anew the structure of texts, to write literary and cultural history with greater richness and depth, and to understand social and institutional relations more intricately."

In twenty-one refreshingly

Overview

Teaching Contemporary Theory to Undergraduates shows readers how theory can, in the words of William E. Cain, enable teachers and students "to illuminate anew the structure of texts, to write literary and cultural history with greater richness and depth, and to understand social and institutional relations more intricately."

In twenty-one refreshingly readable essays, contributors discuss their techniques for introducing theory to students in classes on a range of levels. They describe how they overcame initial apprehensions about teaching theory to undergraduates and enumerate the ways that theory enriched both their and their students' experiences. The theoretical methodologies covered include feminism, poststructuralism, deconstruction, African American criticism, new historicism, cultural studies, and film theory.

Intended for teachers who already use theory in their courses as well as for those who are teaching theory for the first time, the volume offers history, analysis, and practical advice.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Theory accomplishes something that is both relatively straightforward and supremely important. It enables critics, teachers, and students to illuminate anew the structure of texts, to write literary and cultural history with greater richness and depth, and to understand social and institutional relations more intricately." --William E. Cain, Teaching Contemporary Theory to Undergraduates

"Theory accomplishes something that is both relatively straightforward and supremely important. It enables critics, teachers, and students to illuminate anew the structure of texts, to write literary and cultural history with greater richness and depth, and to understand social and institutional relations more intricately." --William E. Cain, Teaching Contemporary Theory to Undergraduates

"The book's greatest strength is in its no-nonsense, this-is-how-I-do-it-in-my-class approach, as told by academics at an impressively broad range of schools: from Kenyon, Wheaton, and St. Mary's College, to the Universities of Michigan, Texas, and Southern Maine. Remarkably free of impenetrable jargon, the essays describe both the ups and downs, the successes and the failures, of many different curricular innovations and pedagogical practices." --James Deutsch, George Washington University

Booknews
In 21 essays, contributors discuss their techniques for introducing theory to students in classes on a range of levels. They describe how they overcame initial apprehensions about teaching theory to undergraduates and enumerate the ways that theory enriched both their and their students' experiences. The theoretical methodologies covered include feminism, poststructuralism, deconstruction, African American criticism, new historicism, cultural studies, and film theory. Paper edition (unseen), $19.75. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780873523684
Publisher:
Modern Language Association of America
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Series:
Options for Teaching Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
277
Product dimensions:
6.38(w) x 8.91(h) x 0.82(d)

Meet the Author


Dianne F. Sandoff is professor of English at Rutgers University. She is author of Victorian Vogue: The British Novel on Screen (2009) and coeditor of Victorian Afterlife: Contemporary Culture Rewrites the Nineteenth Century (2000). Her articles have appeared in journals such as Novel, Studies in English Literature, and Henry James Review.

William E. Cain is Mary Jewett Gaiser Professor of English at Wellesley College. His scholarly interests include nineteenth- and early-twentieth century American literature, modernism in the arts, and Shakespeare. His publications include chapters on American literary and cultural criticism, 1900-1945, in The Cambridge History of American Literature, vol. 5 (2003). He is coeditor of the Norton Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism (1st ed., 2001; 2nd ed., 2010), and, with Sylvan Barnet, he has coauthored a number of books on literature and composition.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews