Teaching Learners of English in Mainstream Classrooms (K-8)

Teaching Learners of English in Mainstream Classrooms (K-8)

by Linda New Levine, Mary Lou McCloskey
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0205410596

ISBN-13: 9780205410590

Pub. Date: 08/15/2008

Publisher: Pearson

A unique resource for today’s ELL and Literacy courses, Teaching Learners of English in Mainstream Classrooms is designed to help K-8 classroom teachers integrate language learning into the content curriculum.

Long-awaited, this book helps teachers include and integrate English language learners into their K-8 content

Overview

A unique resource for today’s ELL and Literacy courses, Teaching Learners of English in Mainstream Classrooms is designed to help K-8 classroom teachers integrate language learning into the content curriculum.

Long-awaited, this book helps teachers include and integrate English language learners into their K-8 content classrooms. Teachers learn to promote content achievement for all of their students by using the helpful strategies provided. Specifically written for content teachers in a friendly and clear writing style, Linda Levine and Mary Lou McCloskey emphasize practical application of known second language learning principles. This resource stands out from other texts on the market by offering specific strategies to teachers to accelerate the academic achievement of all their students, using techniques for developing reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in the content areas.

Key Features :

  • Each chapter begins with a teaching vignette from the classroom. Teachers will “see” examples showing how these principles and strategies for teaching English learners are integrated into daily content classroom instruction.
  • Recommendations are provided to aid the development of reading and writing skills in older pre-literate learners as well as under-educated learners.
  • Two integrated, multi-disciplinary content-based thematic units richly illustrate the teaching practices introduced in the book.
  • The recently published TESOL/WIDA standards are referenced and applied.
  • Available with MyEducationLab, a rich online resource that offers prospective teachers the opportunity to assess their knowledge, view live classroom footage, evaluate classroom artifacts, and much more!

Reviewers Are Raving!

"I loved page 33 Carousel brainstorming. A great way to incorporate listening, speaking, reading, and writing without lower level students feeling threatened."

-Mary A. Phillips, Title III Program Specialist in ESOL in Georgia

"The authors’ explanations show their broad knowledge in all aspects of teaching English learners and their comments and insights are like hidden gems..."

-Clara Lee Brown, University of Tennessee-Knoxville

To order this book WITH MyEducationLab, use either ISBN:

ISBN-13: 9780138155964

ISBN-10: 0138155968

To order this book WITHOUT MyEducationLab use either ISBN:

ISBN-13: 9780205410590

ISBN-10: 0205410596

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780205410590
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
08/15/2008
Series:
MyEducationLab Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

List of Tables, Figures, and Photos

Introduction

Chapter 1: Language Acquisition and Language Learning in the Classroom

What do we know about first language acquisition?

Language acquisition is universal

Language acquisition is natural

Language acquisition does not require instruction

What is the nature of the first language environment?

Children are immersed in language

Language is highly contextualized

Language is a tool for purposeful use

Children are physically active while learning languages

Acquisition occurs within a social environment

Children choose those aspects of language they wish to acquire

Language acquisition is emotionally embedded

Language acquisition is an integrated learning experience

How is learning a second language in the classroom different from acquiring a first language?

The acquisition and learning hypothesis

The natural order hypothesis

The input hypothesis

The affective filter hypothesis

The monitor hypothesis

What are factors affecting acquisition?

Limited language input

Classroom organization

High content and language level

Academic and social language

Negative Bias

Cognition, age, and social/cultural differences

Error correction

Culture shock

What strategies do ELLs use to acquire languages?

Overgeneralization

Transfer

Simplification

What Can ELLs Tell Us About Positive Classroom Environments and Learning Experiences?

ELLs are active acquirers

ELLs seek to find meaning

ELLs seek to use language for purposeful activity

ELLs profit from physical activity

ELLs are social beings

ELLs choose the language they want to learn

ELLs respond to an emotionally positive classroom

ELLs respond to interesting content information

Questions for Reflection

Activities for further learning

Suggested readings about first language acquisition

Suggested readings about comprehensible input

Web Sites for further learning

References

Chapter Two

Principles of Integrated Language Teaching and Learning

Activity-Based Language Teaching and Learning

Principle 1: Active Engagement.

Principle 2: Cultural Relevance

Principle 3. Collaboration

Principle 4: Learning Strategies

Communicative Teaching and Learning

Principle 5: Comprehensible Input with Scaffolding

Principle 6: Prior Knowledge

Principle 7. Content Integration

Principle 8: Differentiation

Principle 9. Clear, Appropriate Goals and Feedback

Questions for reflection

Activities for further learning

Suggested Reading

Web Resources

References

Chapter 3: Reaching Out to Home and Community

Vignette

Questions

Teachers as Cultural Mediators

How do teachers connect to the homes and families of their students?

How can the school community support the education of language learners?

How can the community outside the school support the education of ELLs?

Questions for Reflection

Activities for Further Learning

Suggested Reading

Websites for Further Learning

References

Chapter 4: Principles for Managing the Integrated Classroom

Vignette

Questions

First Things First: Feeling Ready to Learn

Greetings

Provisioning

Gathering information

Organizing the Physical Environment to Promote Language Learning

Furniture is important

Public areas

Private space

Organizing the Classroom Social Environment to Promote Language Learning

Social integration

Presentation formats

Grouping

Learning styles

Organizing Instruction to Promote Language Learning

CALLA

Sheltered instruction

Cooperative Learning

Problem-based Learning

Project Learning

Questions for Reflection

Activities for further learning

Suggested readings on sheltered instruction

Suggested readings on cooperative learning

Web Sites

References

Chapter 5: Strategies for Oral Language Development During Instruction

Vignette

Questions

Conditions for Language Learning

Academic Language Learning

What is academic language?

Culturally diverse learning patterns

Oral Language Development

Stages of Oral Language Development

Pre-production

Early Production

Speech Emergence

Intermediate Fluency

Teacher Tools for Oral Language Development

Clarity Tools

Scaffolding

Question and Response Tools

Collaborative Dialogues

Questions for Reflection

Activities for Further Learning

Suggested Reading

Web Sites for Further Learning

Chapter 6: Oral Language Development in the Content Classroom

Content Learning and Oral Language Development

Language Arts

Story Telling

Reader’s Theater

Social Studies

Math

Factors Affecting Achievement

Instructional Techniques for math class

Science

Factors Affecting Achievement

Instructional Techniques for science class

Oral Language Development Every Which Way

Songs and Chants/Poetry and Rap

Role Plays, RAFTS and Simulations

Listening In While Not Tuning Out

Sound Discrimination

Listening for Understanding

Questions for Reflection

Activities for Further Learning

Suggested Reading

Web Sites for Further Learning

References

Chapter 7: Developing Literacy with English Learners: Focus on Reading

What is literacy?

Top-down approaches

Bottom-up approaches

Integrated approaches

Unique characteristics of English learners developing literacy

What is unique about English Language Learners who are developing literacy?

What ELLs bring

2. What ELLs need

The Language/Literacy Matrix

Issues in literacy development with older English learners

What are our recommendations for these older learners?

Assessing ELL Literacy Development

Conclusion

Questions for reflection

Activities for further learning

Suggested Readings

Web resources for further learning

References

Chapter 8: Developing Literacy with English Learners: Focus on Writing

Why Teach Writing with English Learners?

How does writing develop with ELLs?

Connecting Writing to Active, Communicative Language Teaching and Learning

Challenges of teaching writing to English Learners

Developing a writing environment

Getting Started: Interactive Writing

Scaffolding Learners through the Writing Process

What is the Writing Process?

Modeling the Writing Process

Steps in Shared Writing

Assessing Writing

Determining Goals--Standards for ELL Writing.

Conclusion.

Questions for Reflection

Activities for Further Learning

Suggested Readings

Web Resources for Further Learning

References

Chapter 9: Structuring and Planning Integrated Lessons

Vignette

Questions

Lesson Characteristics which Support Learning

Teacher directed instruction

Heterogeneous grouping

Appropriate content

Attention to language

Supportive practice

Corrective feedback

A Lesson Format for Integrated Learning

Into the Lesson: Activating and Preparing for Learning

Content and Language Standards

Defining content objectives

Language objectives

Performance Indicators (3 kinds of supports)

Learning strategy Objectives (with Chamot chart)

Activation of prior and current knowledge

Through: Input for Active Understanding and Practical Purpose

Vocabulary

Language and content input

Guided practice

Check for understanding (Dipsticking)

Beyond: Providing Reasons for Further Communication

Independent practice

Summarizing

Assessment

Questions for Reflection

Activities for further learning

Suggested reading

Web sites for further learning

References

Chapter 10: Assessment Tools for the Integrated Classroom

Vignette

Questions

What is Assessment?

Test

Assessment

Evaluation

Different types of assessment

What are the fundamental principles of assessment for ELLs?

What are the critical factors affecting the assessment of ELLs

What are examples of authentic, performance-based classroom assessment?

PBA

Self-assessment

Visible criteria

How do standards affect classroom assessment?

Questions for Reflection

Activities for further learning

Suggested reading

Web site for further learning

References

Chapter 11: Putting It All Together Thematically: Developing Content-based

Thematic Units

Vignette

Questions

What is thematic instruction?

Why teach thematically?

How are thematic units structured?

· Concrete to abstract

· Low to high cognitive levels

· Simple to complex content structures

What about standards in a Thematic Unit?

Organizing Content Curriculum in a Thematic Unit

Organizing Language Curriculum in a Thematic Unit

How can Learning Strategies be incorporated in to a Thematic Unit?

A Last Word

Questions for Reflection

Activities for further learning

Suggested readings

Web sites for further learning

References

Glossary

Integrated Thematic Unit: Fairy Tales

Integrated Thematic Unit: Oceans

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >