Teaching Religion and Film

Teaching Religion and Film

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by Gregory J Watkins
     
 

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"In Teaching Religion and Film, an interdisciplinary team of scholars thinks about the theoretical and pedagogical concerns involved with the intersection of film and religion in the classroom. They examine the use of film to teach specific religious traditions, religious theories, and perspectives on fundamental human values." Some instructors already teach some…  See more details below

Overview

"In Teaching Religion and Film, an interdisciplinary team of scholars thinks about the theoretical and pedagogical concerns involved with the intersection of film and religion in the classroom. They examine the use of film to teach specific religious traditions, religious theories, and perspectives on fundamental human values." Some instructors already teach some version of a film and religion course, and many have integrated film as an ancillary to achieving central course goals. This collection of essays helps them understand the field better and draws the sharp distinction between merely "watching movies" in the classroom and comprehending film in an informed and critical way.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This book is a gold mine for faculty who teach religion and film. Full of theoretical and practical resources for effective teaching, it opens exciting avenues for exploration. These thoughtful essays provide wonderful questions and suggestions for expediting discussion of the inevitably complex knots of race, gender, class, values, and ethnicities raised so forcefully by movies. Teaching Religion and Film contributes greatly to refining a relatively new and exciting field." —Margaret R. Miles, author of Seeing and Believing: Religion and Values in the Movies

"There is currently no other guide that offers such challenging and important approaches to understanding pedagogical concerns for teaching religion and film. This compilation of works from ground-breaking authors in the field analyzes the distinctiveness of film and its religious dimensions, not only from a theological approach to religion, but from other cultural frames of reference which manifest themselves in movies. Timely and comprehensive, this book offers a much needed, authoritative, and wide-ranging set of pedagogical tools not just for the teacher but for anyone who wishes to understand the complex characteristics of film and religion." —Rubina Ramji, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Cape Breton University, Nova Scotia, and Film Review Editor for the Journal of Religion and Film

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199714582
Publisher:
Netlibrary Inc
Publication date:
08/22/2008
Series:
An American Academy of Religion Book
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
510 KB

Meet the Author

Greg Watkins is Lecturer in the Program in Structured Liberal Education, Stanford University and Co-Director of Virtual Mandala, a project of the Stanford Humanities Lab. He is also a filmmaker, with an MFA in Film Production from UCLA.

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Teaching Religion and Film 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This edited volume explores the creative possibilities for teaching courses on religion and film, and it was generated partly as a response to students' openness to - even expectation of - multimedia approaches to course material. It discusses some of the pedagogical challenges of using films in Religious Studies classrooms and also examines the range of theoretical approaches one might take in constructing a course that uses religion to consider film or vice versa. Several of the volume's contributors note that previous approaches to religion and film have largely focused on narrative, using techniques from textual criticism to analyze religious elements in film or how film presents a critique of religion, but one might also consider the uniqueness of film: its ability to play upon the senses (especially visual and auditory) that distinguish it from literature. They suggest ways we might better equip our students with the skills to analyze the visual media that they are increasingly exposed to, enhancing their critical thinking so that they can question what they see and not simply consume these kinds of media.