Teaching Science for All Children: An Inquiry Approach / Edition 5

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Overview

The Fifth Edition of this popular elementary science methods text emphasizes learning science through inquiry, implementation of the Learning Cycle, NSE standards, constructivism, technology, and strategies for teaching diverse learners. Teaching Science for All Children employs an inquiry model throughout, especially apparent in the design of its learning cycle lesson plans.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Details strategies and specific learning activities for teaching science in the classroom. After an overview of essential concepts, Part II focuses on preparing elementary and middle school lessons, and Part III emphasizes the 4E learning cycle and discusses a variety of teaching methods and teacher skills. Part IV contains some 60 complete science lessons with about 150 hands-on activities. Appendices offer contacts for organizations and materials sources. This second edition incorporates the National Science Education Standards throughout. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205594917
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 4/18/2008
  • Series: MyEducationLab Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 592
  • Sales rank: 162,896
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. Ralph Martin is Professor of Science Education at Ohio University, Athens, OH. During his 35 years as an educator, he has taught science lessons and led projects spanning K-16. His research and scholarship has produced more than 15 books and manuals (various editions) and netted millions in funding for teacher professional development in science and math. He has received numerous Ohio and national awards in recognition of his teaching and leadership and has coordinated, directed, and chaired many university programs and faculty units. Presently he serves as Chair of the Science Review Board for the Ohio Resource Center for Mathematics, Science and Reading (www.ohiorc.org) and is Co-Director of the South East Ohio Center for Excellence in Mathematics and Science (www.seocems.org), which conducts research, provides professional development programs, and supports educational improvement efforts focused on Appalachia Ohio.

Dr. Colleen Sexton is an Associate Professor of Science Education at Governors State University, University Park, IL. She is the Academic Director of the South Suburban Consortium for Grow Your Own Illinois Teachers. This initiative is designed to provide a college degree to teacher candidates committed to teaching in traditionally hard-to-staff school districts. She has a special interest in Environmental Education and effective Integration of Educational Technology in the classroom. She has traveled to Turkey and Cyprus to deliver professional development in science education to K-8 teachers and to present keynote addresses at International Technology Conferences on the effective use of educational technology tools in science classrooms. Prior to GSU she was an Associate Professor and Secondary Education Coordinator at Ohio University in Athens, OH. Dr. Sexton also served for four years as the Program Manager for the Ohio SchoolNet Plus Initiative. This $495M initiative was designed to provide one interactive workstation in the classroom for every five children throughout Ohio’s K-5 classrooms. While with Ohio SchoolNet she was also directly responsible for the professional development opportunities for the interactive video projects. From 1988-1996 Dr. Sexton served as instructor and then as an Assistant Professor for the College of Education at Ohio University, serving as Curriculum Director for the Appalachian Distance Learning Project – a 3rd grade interactive video pilot. Her K-12 experience includes eight years of high school science teaching in the Chicago area and one year of teaching introductory biology at the community college level. Her research areas include the use of handhelds in higher education, the integration of educational technology into the science curriculum, and teacher dispositions in an online learning environment.

Dr. Teresa Franklin in an Associate Professor in Instructional Technology at Ohio University, Athens, OH. Her love of teaching and learning through the integration of technology in the K-12 and higher education curriculum spans thirty years. As a science teacher in 1979, she began to use computers in her middle school Life Science and Earth Science lessons to help students gather data and solve problems. Teresa has served on the Ohio Technology Academic Content Standards Committee and the International Society for Technology in Education—National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers writing committee. Research interests include the integration of technology within the science curriculum, virtual environments for learning, handheld technologies in the classroom, and online course development.

Authors of Chapter 10:

Dr. Jack A. Gerlovich is Levvitt Distinguished Professor of science/education/safety at Drake University. A Levvitt Professor must exemplify the qualities of “effective consulting, research, teaching, mentoring, and relationship-building.” He is the author or coauthor of seven books, thirty state and national journal articles, and two national and fifteen customized state software/CD-ROM programs on science safety. During his thirty-plus years in education, he has served as the State Science Supervisor for the Iowa Department of Education and as a science teacher at all levels of education. At Drake University, he teaches classes in Issues in Foundations of American Education (elementary, secondary, and graduate levels), Elementary Science Methods, and Science Safety. He has conducted nearly 200 science safety worships throughout the nation; served as an expert witness in court cases involving science safety issues; assisted industry, government, and education as a safety consultant; and developed training programs and software/CD-ROM packages customized to individual state needs. He was also certified by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Safety Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Council of State Science Supervisors (CSSS) 16-hour Occupational Safety & Health course in Safety in the School Science Laboratory. Having been a commercially licensed, multiengine rate pilot for several years, he is also conscious of being safe and prepared.

Dr. Dennis McElroy is an Assistant Professor of Education at Graceland University and does science safety consulting with JaKel, Inc. He has also served as Graceland’s Vice-President for Information Services, Educational Technologist at Drake University’s School of Education, and Technology Consultant for the Iowa Department of Education. Dennis is on the National Science Teacher’s Association Safety Board. He previously taught science at the high school level in Kansas, Arizona, and Iowa.

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Table of Contents

Preface

I. 4-E Methods for Teaching Science

1. What is the Nature of Science?

How Do Children Perceive Science?

What Changes Have Occurred in Elementary Science?

The Nature of Science

Three Essential Features of Science

The Aims of Standards and Research-Based Education

2. How do Children Learn Science?

What Role Does Brain Development and Processing Play in Learning?

Where Do Children's Ideas Come From and How Do They Influence Learning?

What Is the Dominant Perspective About How Children Learn Science?

What Techniques and Roles Support Constructivist Learning?

3. How Can You Improve Science Learning for Diverse Learners?

Science For All

Science for Exceptional Children

How Can Parents Help Meet Children's Special Needs?

4. How Do You Plan for the Inquiry-Based Classroom?

Using the National Science Education Standards and Promoting Inquiry.

Concept Mapping

Planning Constructive Inquiry Science Lessons

5. What Inquiry Methods Help Learners to Construct Understanding?

What is Scientific Literacy?

Science as Inquiry for Literacy

Methods that Use Inquiry to Promote Student Concept Formation

Techniques for Promoting Student Cooperation

Recommendations for Enhancing Student's Learning of Science

6. How Can You Use Questions to Foster Scientific Inquiry?

Questions on Questions

What Are the Different Types of Questions?

What Are the Keys to Effective Questioning?

How Can You Improve Your Questioning?

Why Use Students' Questions

7. How Do You Develop and Use Authentic Assessment?

Evaluating Student Learning

Selecting the Tool for the Task.

8. How Does Technology Enrich Scientific Inquiry?

Why Use Educational Technology?

How Can Educational Technology Be Applied in the Context of Science Teaching?

What Is Integration?

9. How Do You Plan for and Integrate Science with Other Disciplines?

Approaches to Integration

Challenges to Integration

10. How Can You Design and Manage a Safe Inquiry-Based Science Classroom?

Recommendations for Safe Science Experiences

How Do You Plan for Safety?

What Are Your Legal Responsibilities?

Safety Equipment

Performing Safety Assessments

What Materials are Necessary for the Activities?

Storage

Room Arrangement

A Final Thought

11. What Materials and Resources Promote Inquiry-Based Science?

Lessons Learned

Selecting and Using Textbooks

Best Practices

Resources for Best Practices

II. 4-E Inquiry Lessons for Teaching Science

Life Science Lessons and Activities

Physical Science Lessons and Activities

Earth and Space Science Activities

Appendix: National Science Education Standards: Contents Standards for Grades K-4 and 5-8.

References

Index

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