Tears of Autumn: A Paul Christopher Novel

Tears of Autumn: A Paul Christopher Novel

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by Charles McCarry
     
 

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Threatened by Kennedy's assassins and by his own government, secret agent Christopher follows the scent of his suspicion—one breath behind the truth, one step ahead of discovery and death.

"As soon as he began publishing fiction more than three decades ago, Charles McCarry was recognized as a spy novelist of uncommon gifts" wrote Charles Trueheart in The

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Overview

Threatened by Kennedy's assassins and by his own government, secret agent Christopher follows the scent of his suspicion—one breath behind the truth, one step ahead of discovery and death.

"As soon as he began publishing fiction more than three decades ago, Charles McCarry was recognized as a spy novelist of uncommon gifts" wrote Charles Trueheart in The Washington Post. Tears of Autumn, McCarry’s riveting novel of espionage and foreign affairs, was a major bestseller upon its first publication in 1975. Spun with unsettling plausibility from the events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and featuring Paul Christopher, it’s a tour de force of action and enigma. Christopher, at the height of his powers, believes he knows who arranged the assassination, and why. His theory is so destructive of the legend of the dead president, though, and so dangerous to the survival of foreign policy that he is ordered to desist from investigating. But he is a man who lives by, and for, the truth—and his internal compunctions force him to the heart of the matter. Christopher resigns from the Agency and embarks on a tour of investigation that takes him from Paris to Rome, Zurich, the Congo, and Saigon.

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Editorial Reviews

Patrick Anderson
approached this handsome new edition of Charles McCarry's masterpiece, The Tears of Autumn, with trepidation. The novel was first published in 1974, and it has been more than 20 years since I last read it. I had only a hazy memory that (1) it was beautifully written, (2) it offered a plausible theory of the Kennedy assassination and (3) it was a classic. My concern was that, given a new reading, the novel might not hold up, but my fear was groundless. The Tears of Autumn is beautifully written, its conspiracy theory still intrigues and it most assuredly is a classic..
— The Washington Post
Library Journal
Tears is the first in a new series of McCarry reprints from Overlook. Released in 1975, this political thriller reveals a government agent's crusade to discover the truth behind the JFK assassination. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590203828
Publisher:
The Overlook Press
Publication date:
06/26/2007
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
213,527
File size:
756 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Charles McCarry is the author, most recently, of Christopher’s Ghosts, and has written ten acclaimed novels featuring Paul Christopher and his family (all available from Overlook). During the Cold War, he was an intelligence officer operating under deep cover in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

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Tears of Autumn: A Paul Christopher Novel 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Lance_Charnes More than 1 year ago
McCarry – like John LeCarre and Daniel Silva – is known as one of those authors who “gets it right” with his spy yarns. The Tears of Autumn is his second novel and the second to feature his series character Paul Christopher, a CIA agent active during the 1950s and 1960s. In this installment, Christopher decides to solve the JFK assassination. Nothing like swinging for the fences, eh? Even though Christopher flirts with super-agenthood – speaking multiple languages, near-photographic memory, dangerously handsome, culturally sensitive, etc. – he’s not a one-man killing machine like his counterparts in spy thrillers (which this isn’t). He doesn’t carry a gun, hardly kills anyone at all, and talks (or buys) his way into and out of trouble rather than blowing up things. This is spy work closer to how spies really work. The old-school (pre-9/11) received spy wisdom was if you kill someone, you’ve blown your cover and you’re done. McCarry’s depiction of Christopher’s stops in this 1963-64 travelogue (D.C., Saigon, Paris, Rome, Zermatt) are atmospheric and evocative without slowing things down; his settings remind me of Alan Furst’s, lightly drawn but presenting enough detail to feel authentic. Similarly, Christopher’s spycraft is described with confidence without descending into textbookism. Since McCarry was a CIA case officer for several years, we have some assurance that what his characters do is as real as he could get past the CIA’s censors. The downside? This novel is emotionally chilly; even when Christopher is supposed to be contemplating his internal demons or an unexpected chance at love, it feels as if he’s doing it because he thinks he’s supposed to rather than because he’s compelled to do it. It’s also fairly short and travels in a straight line. Christopher formulates a theory about the JFK assassination (which he doesn’t share with us) at the beginning and follows it without many twists or turns straight through to being proven right. This isn’t a thriller (Our Hero isn’t often in imminent mortal danger) nor is it a mystery; it’s a spy procedural, an exercise in watching a skilled operative do his thing, step-by-step, in a turbulent time. It’s fascinating, but it’s neither moving nor exciting. The Tears of Autumn is almost British in its reserve, LeCarre with an American protagonist. If you want explosions and global conspiracies, there are plenty of other authors to turn to. If you want to see an ideal real-world covert agent do his job at the height of the Cold War and want to go places other than London and Berlin, McCarry’s your man.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Padded in. Hi! (Merrydream)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago