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The Teashop Girls [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Official Rules of the Teashop Girls

1. Teashop girls are best friends forever.
2. Tea is held every week, no matter what.
3. All tea and scones must be split equally at all times.

Annie, Genna, and Zoe have been hanging out at ...
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The Teashop Girls

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Overview

The Official Rules of the Teashop Girls

1. Teashop girls are best friends forever.
2. Tea is held every week, no matter what.
3. All tea and scones must be split equally at all times.

Annie, Genna, and Zoe have been hanging out at the Steeping Leaf since elementary school. The Teashop Girls do everything together -- at least they used to. With the end of eighth grade approaching, Genna's too busy with theater, Zoe's always at tennis, and Annie feels totally left out. What happened to tea every week, no matter what?

When Annie convinces her grandmother to give her a job as a barista at the Leaf, things begin to look up. In between whipping up chai lattes for customers, and attempting to catch the attention of her Barista Boy crush, Annie is finally beginning to feel as grown-up as her best friends. But an eviction notice spells trouble for the Leaf and unless they can turn the business around, the teashop will have to close its doors forever.

Fresh, honest, and sweet, Laura Schaefer's debut novel is sure to resonate with readers everywhere.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Everything tea drinkers might want to know about that beverage can be found in this clever first novel. Thirteen-year-old Annie is determined to keep her grandmother's old-fashioned teashop from going out of business. As she tries to drum up new customers, she faces other problems as well: her two best friends' waning interest in the project, her ill-fated crush on her grandmother's cute new employee and unwanted attention from a less desirable boy. Recipes, facts and quotes about tea are sandwiched between the chapters, and cozy illustrations of teapots and cakes alongside photographs of vintage advertisements add to the fun. However, the onslaught of extras can interrupt the flow of the story. Like the mismatched interior of the Steeping Leaf cafe, the eclectic, slightly cluttered nature of this book won't be everyone's cup of you-know-what, but those who share the heroine's passion for funk (and, of course, tea) will drink it up. Ages 8-14. (Dec.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Best friends Annie, Genna and Zoe have often celebrated special occasions and shared secrets in the Steeping Leaf Teashop owned by Annie's grandmother. But their lives are changing as they approach the end of eighth grade and start planning for high school. Genna is busy with art and theater, while Zoe has become a tennis star. Annie decides to work as a barista at the shop so that she has something to do. She soon discovers that her grandmother's business is in trouble and foreclosure is looming. The friends get together to brainstorm ideas and try to save the teashop, but all looks hopeless—especially when the other barista recommends modernizing the shop and thus ruining its unique personality. The sweet, mostly predictable story seems to be a vehicle for relaying a lot of historical and factual information about teas. Reproductions of old magazine advertisements for teas, recipes for flavored teas and pastries, and quotations from famous people about teas appear throughout. The audience for this book is not clear. It seems to be a nostalgia piece more likely to appeal to grandmothers than to teen/preteen girls. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
Kirkus Reviews
Nurtured in her grandmother Louisa's teashop, The Steeping Leaf, Annie and best friends Zoe and Genna have been the "teashop girls" since kindergarten. As eighth grade rolls to a close, Annie laments the new directions Zoe and Genna are moving in, even as Annie's love for everything connected with the shop remains steadfast, bolstered by her new job as barista. When competition from the coffee chain across the street places the business in financial jeopardy, Annie makes it her mission to save the shop's unique and historic place in the community. Schaefer's first tween novel is filled with down-to-earth good values, conflict, budding romantic yearnings and some wonderful side notes on the benefits of tea, its history and global uses. Annie's distinct relationship with her grandmother parallels her equally special connection with her peers as she faces change and maturity. The drama of keeping The Steeping Leaf open will keep sprouting teens hopeful. Despite a convenient ending, a satisfying story. (Fiction. 8-12)
From the Publisher
“Everything tea drinkers might want to know about that beverage can be found in this clever first novel.” —Publishers Weekly

“Like good tea: comforting, refreshing, and sustaining.” —Booklist

“a satisfying story” —Kirkus

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416998358
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books
  • Publication date: 12/22/2009
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 224,372
  • Age range: 9 - 13 Years
  • Lexile: 710L (what's this?)
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Laura Schaefer
Laura Schaefer has been writing almost as long as she's been making tea. She got her start as a contributor to the University of Wisconsin's student paper, the Daily Cardinal, and went on to write regularly for the Princeton Review and Match.com. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin, where she can usually be found dancing the lindy hop. Her favorite type of tea is English Breakfast with lots of milk and sugar. Visit her online at www.teashopgirls.com.
Sujean Rim is an illustrator whose work is often seen on DailyCandy. She lives in New York City.
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Read an Excerpt


Chapter One

“My dear if you could give me a cup of tea to clear my muddle of a head I should better understand your affairs.” —CHARLES DICKENS, MRS. LIRRIPER’S LEGACY

There’s a right way and a wrong way to do many things, and when it comes to tea, my opinion is one should not mess around. My grandmother Louisa first taught me to brew a fine pot of tea when I was five years old. She told me what a nice job I had done, and I announced I wanted to be just like her when I grew up. Louisa laughed merrily at the time. I hoped she wouldn’t laugh today. I couldn’t bear the thought of being laughed at today, which is why I, Annie Green, am hiding out in the storage room of the Steeping Leaf.

Well, not hiding exactly. That would be silly. I love the Leaf, and there isn’t anything out there to hide from, least of all my grandmother Louisa. But the fact of the matter is I am here in her teashop, she doesn’t know it yet, and the reason for all my sneaking around is I need to psych myself up for what I am about to do.

You know how some people have weird/cool talents, like being able to wiggle their ears back and forth just by concentrating really hard? Well, I have one too. I can stand on my head forever. Like, seriously forever. My two brothers can even try to tickle my feet to knock me over, and I just make faces at them, upside down, secure in the knowledge that I am just as steady on my head as they are on their feet. Which isn’t, come to think of it, as steady as, say, Louisa is on her feet, but it’s pretty darn good. And as a bonus, when I stand on my head, I can feel myself getting smarter and calmer. I think it has something to do with the fact that a headstand is a real yoga pose.

With two younger brothers and an older sister, it’s hard to ever find even half a moment alone. And the silence of the storage room is blissful. It’s just me, upside down and Zenlike amidst a few dozen boxes of loose tea, some old teacups Louisa hasn’t taken to St. Vinny’s yet, and my “Perfect Cup of Tea Instructions,” which I’ve written on a whiteboard that, for readability’s sake, has also assumed the sirsha-asana pose.

I am almost ready to ask for a job here as a barista. And when I do, I will be calm, centered, grown-up, and only slightly red in the face. I am a tiny bit worried because sometimes my family doesn’t take me seriously. Everyone else in my family already has their “thing”—Beth is all “college, college, college … did I mention that I’m going away to college in the fall?” and Luke and Billy have the lock on the local emergency room—skateboarders, it’s like they have a death wish or something. My mom has her students, and my dad has his engineering projects. And I have tea.

Okay, I’ll admit, I’m interested in a lot of things and I tend to announce my newest obsessions rather frequently—but working at the Leaf is not just a phase. I’ve always loved the Leaf and confess that I consider it partly, well, mine. Am I ready to be a barista, taking money, making complex foamy drinks, and asking after the customers’ families like the perfect hostess? I think so. I hope Louisa does, too.

Still staring at the board and mentally picturing each and every step of brewing a pot of tea, I sighed happily and closed my eyes to fully commune with the delicious smells of the shop. Inhale. Exhale. “I am one with the tea. The tea is one with me. I am one with the t—”

The storage door banged and there was some commotion. My eyes snapped open, but all I could see was a pair of legs in jeans. And a box. A really big box. A really big box coming straight at me. “Hey, watch out!”

Instead of changing course however, the startled jeans-wearer swung the box around. Right into me. “AUGHH!” he cried, tripping a little and juggling the box. It was definitely a he, I thought as I tumbled over, directly into a precarious stack of napkins, tea samples, and the shelf with the old cups. CRASH! went one cup. Then, CRASH! CRASH! CRASH! came three more. Ouch.

The napkins flew everywhere, and some of the samples burst open, sending leaves and particles of rosehips, chamomile, orange spice, and white tea every which way. I stared at the intruder from the corner where I was sprawled out, confused. I thought Louisa was the only one who ever came in here. Well, and me, of course. CRASH! One more cup slid to the ground.

The intruder set his box down veeery slowly and righted the shelf I had tipped. I was just about to sputter something extremely non-Zenlike when the words got tangled up in my tongue. My scowl fully retreated as my eyes widened. Why hadn’t I seen him before? It occurred to me that most girls could go a whole life time of seeing strange boys in teashops (grocery stores, movie theaters, stadiums … you get the idea) and not lay eyes on someone so perfectly gorgeous.

“What were you do ing?” he asked, offering me a hand up. I took it slowly, my stomach flipping.

“I … I …” Apparently, I could no longer speak. Great.

He cocked his head expectantly. I stared. And stared. And stared. Finally I said the first and best thing that came to mind. “I was standing on my head. I do that.”

I do that. Wow. Smooth. I could feel my face reddening.

“Oh.” He looked at me as if I were some amusing—yet potentially deranged—creature from another planet. “Why?”

I didn’t get the chance to reply because the door to the main shop opened again and Louisa came hurrying into the room, her scarves flowing luxuriantly behind her.

“What on earth? Is everything all right? Annie, my sweetness! What are you doing here?”

Just when you think your face can’t get any redder, know this:

It can.

© 2008 Laura Schaefer

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2012

    AMAZING

    I loved this book it is full of unexpected twists and turns all the way until the end! Recomended for anyone age 10 to age 100!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    Ok so this book was really good, but some parts were a little qu

    Ok so this book was really good, but some parts were a little questionable. Like when the girls have a fight i noticed a couple of grammer errors. Was this on purpose????? Over all though it was a good book. Im looking forward to the next one.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    Great

    Loved this book and the second

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2011

    Wonderful! By Annie

    I love the book: the teashop girls! It is one of those everyone books, a book that has fiction, action, friendship, a tad of mystery, and just a sprinkle on love. A must read for tweens. I devoured every page of this book. It makes your heart feel warm and fuzzy! : )

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2012

    I never got it but i think its good because im turning 10and someone said it is good for a ten yaer old so im going toget

    I love it : )

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    Eneddddd

    Trffct

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Rummel for TeensReadToo

    Annie and her two BFFs, Genna and Zoe, used to hang out at her grandmother's tea shop. Now, with the end of 8th grade drawing near, the friends are pulled in different directions. Once nicknamed the Teashop girls, each has her own direction. Zoe's focused on tennis. Genna's focused on acting. Annie becomes focused on the shop once again. She asks her grandmother for a job as a barista. Annie soaks up the atmosphere. She loves her job, especially as she gets to flirt with her cute co-worker. Before long, she realizes the Steeping Leaf is in trouble - big trouble. Annie's grandmother might be in danger of closing her shop. Annie vows not to let that happen, and attempts to rally her friends and the neighborhood together to save the shop. Will their efforts be enough to save the Steeping Leaf? A cute book about three girls trying to save their friendship as they grow older and grow apart. The illustrations and tea quotes and facts add to the book's charm. I can't wait to see where the story goes next.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    The teashop girls

    This book is great i love it and cant wait to read others the auther is great please keep coming up with more books like this!!!!!!!!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2011

    Good- for a 10 year old

    I thought it was well done, but a little over-enthusiastic at some points. A good LIGHT read.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2014

    Good

    I recomend this for kids who like to here to sides of a story and love twist and turns. I am a fourth grader and i read book one and two, this is a book for middle schoolars but still kids like me can still read it.






    Thank you for your time,



    CLAUDIA

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2011

    Cool

    Awesome:)

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2011

    Bouy this book two years ago

    Finally decided to pick it up and read it. Pretty good so far. Has an adorable covee

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2011

    :)

    :)

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2009

    Great Book!

    Laura Schaefer is a wonderful author! This book is in a girl's language. It sounds exactly like me and my friends talking, thinking and chatting. The Teashop GirlsT especially meant a lot to me because it takes place in Madison, WI, where I live. I was able to recall every store or restaurant they mentioned. It was so cool! The only other books they've done that for me are some of Kevin Henkes novels. This is a good book for wide age group. The ages are probabaly 9-13. It might mean more to older child though. As an 11 yr. old I loved it! I highly recommend it! I rated it a four star but that was only because I've read A LOT of good books in my lifetime! It is also a great book for a Mother-Daughter book club. I read it with my Mother-Daughter book club! Please read this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    The Tea Shop Girls

    This is a very good book. I strongly recomend it for middle schoolers

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2012

    Such a good book

    This book is great i reccomend it for girls ages 10 to 15. its a great story and i couldnt put it down. Cant wait to read the 2nd book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2012

    Help!

    A couple days ago I went to Barnes and Noble with my nook and used the Read In Store feature to read this book. I read a few chapters and was instantly hooked. However, I had to leave. Later that day I searched and found out the my library (and every other library in my county) didn't have it. Is there any other way to get it free?

    P.S I pictured Annie as Bella Thorne. :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2012

    I have not read it yet

    But I am looking forward to it

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    So good!

    That book was so good! You are really good Laura!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 27, 2011

    Amazing

    I loved this book. It was so giod.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews

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