The Tech-Savvy Booktalker

Overview

Want to add some pizzazz to your booktalks and motivate young readers? Here are simple but powerful ideas and instructions for integrating technology into your presentations, and using booktalks to launch learning across the curriculum. You'll discover how to use your existing technology to make enhanced booktalks to use with students-video, audio, and text; how to integrate the booktalks into the curriculum to meet standards; and how to extend the excitement with online book discussions. Lesson plans and a ...

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Overview

Want to add some pizzazz to your booktalks and motivate young readers? Here are simple but powerful ideas and instructions for integrating technology into your presentations, and using booktalks to launch learning across the curriculum. You'll discover how to use your existing technology to make enhanced booktalks to use with students-video, audio, and text; how to integrate the booktalks into the curriculum to meet standards; and how to extend the excitement with online book discussions. Lesson plans and a wealth of examples, strategies, and resource links make implementation a breeze. Grades 6-12.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

". . . educators who have the necessary technology and who want their students to interact with books in a more engaging way will find plenty here to get them started."

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VOYA

"This excellent resource shows ways to use existing technology to augment booktalks and to expand the experience beyond the classroom."

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School Library Journal

"…a useful addition to your professional toolkit. . . . Keane and Cavanaugh write in a clearcut manner, including technical jargon only when necessary. With their step-by-step approach, even the most technologically challenged librarian will discover how easy it is to be a tech-savvy booktalker."

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Public Libraries

VOYA - Vikki Terrile
These days, librarians and media specialists trying to "sell" books to teens (who have so many other forms of media from which to choose) might feel like they are fighting a losing battle. In this book designed for school media specialists and teachers, Keane, whose Web site is well-known for booktalks and reading lists, and Cavanaugh, an educational technology specialist, offer step-by-step advice on using technology to create booktalks for and with students. The authors provide detailed explanations of how to use common presentation, digital video and audio hardware and software in a range of classroom scenarios; sample lesson plans (with standards) and grading rubrics are also included. As with many books on technology, however, too many specifics can lead to a short shelf-life, which might ultimately be the case here. The many URL links to sample projects, free software, and file resources could be dead links merely six months to a year from now. The authors also do not address the digital divide that still exists in schools; many do not have even the minimum levels of technology discussed here. One comment on the books' layout: the screen-shots, while helpful in theory, are often located pages ahead or behind their references in the text, making it difficult to follow along. Still educators who have the necessary technology and who want their students to interact with books in a more engaging way will find plenty here to get them started. Reviewer: Vikki Terrile
School Library Journal
Keane offers a way to enhance booktalks with technology and to invite students to explore new ways to talk about books using Web 2.0 tools. The volume is divided into 11 chapters from booktalking concepts to more advanced uses of technology including scanners, digital cameras, computer software, and audio recording. Also included are chapters on software programs such as PowerPoint and iMovie as well as Internet sites such as YouTube and Amazon. The sequence of chapters is designed to allow easy access to information for both novice and experienced computer users. Step-by-step illustrated instructions are given for each type of technology-based booktalk, and the many online resources related to the activity are listed at the end of each chapter. Lesson plans meeting specific educational standards and evaluation tools are provided. This excellent resource shows ways to use existing technology to augment booktalks and to expand the experience beyond the classroom.—Denise Moore, O'Gorman Junior High School, Sioux Falls, SD
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591586371
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/1/2008
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 1,395,428
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

NANCY J. KEANE is an award-winning Library Media Specialist at Rundlett Middle School, Concord, New Hampshire, and author of The Big Book of Teen Reading Lists (2006) and The Big Book of Children's Reading Lists (2006). She hosts a popular booktalking website, as well as podcasts and wiki.

TERENCE W. CAVANAUGH is an instructor of instructional technology in the College of Education and Human Services at the University of North Florida. His areas of expertise include instructional technology, electronic books, assistive technology, ESOL education, and teacher education. He has been an educator for over 25 years at the college and secondary level.

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Table of Contents

1 Booktalking Concepts 1

Booktalk Presentation 2

Types of Booktalks 3

Hooks for Books 4

Educator Collaboration 5

Writing the Booktalk 5

Adapting Booktalks from Others 7

Presentation Tips and Tricks 7

Using Bibliographies and Booklists to Support Booktalks 8

Research for Technology with Booktalks 8

2 Booktalk Technology 11

Standards 11

New Literacies 13

The Digital Student 14

Differentiated Instruction and Accommodations 15

Classroom/Technology Management 16

Classroom and School Library Technology Configurations 16

Educator Collaboration 20

Resources 21

Digital Storytelling 23

Booktalk Tech Toolkit 24

3 Text-Based Booktalks 31

In the Classroom 31

Sample Writing Lesson Plan 32

Blog Sites 36

Creating Booktalks with Blogs 37

Cartooning Booktalks 40

Wikis 43

Shelf Talkers 45

Creating a Bookmark Using Publisher2007 47

Booktalk Trading Cards 48

4 Creating or Locating Images 53

Images for Your Booktalk Presentation 53

Storyboards 56

5 Presentation Booktalks 61

In the Classroom 61

Instructions 63

PowerPoint XP 65

Using PowerPoint as a Booktalk Screensaver 68

Booktalks with Open Office Presentation 68

Flash Video Booktalk 71

PhotoShop Elements 4.0 and Up 75

VoiceThread 80

Animoto 82

6 Audio Booktalks 85

In the Classroom 85

Lesson Sequence 86

Creating an Audio Booktalk 92

Podcasting Booktalks 96

Enhanced Podcasts 99

Converting Files to CD Audio 100

7 Creating or Obtaining Audio 103

Narration 103

Background Sound or Sound Effects 103

Soundtrack and Music 104

Microphones 105

8 Video Booktalks 109

In the Classroom 109

Lesson Plan: Booktalking with iMovie 110

Online Video Booktalks114

Creating a Video Booktalk from Still Images 114

Creating Video Booktalks Using Microsoft PhotoStory 116

iMovie 120

Making Video More Interesting 121

Making Better Video 122

Lesson Plan: Recording Video Booktalks 124

Using Windows Movie Maker to Create Booktalk Video 127

Posting to YouTube 130

9 Booktalking Kiosks 133

Kiosk Components 133

Kiosk Setup 134

PowerPoint Kiosks 135

10 Online Resources for Booktalks 137

11 Assessment 141

Rubric Tools 141

Self/Peer Evaluation 144

Everyone Has a Story to Tell ... and We'll Help You Tell It 145

Digital Story Checklist 148

App. A Millennial Generation Students 151

App. B Do's and Don't's of Booktalking 153

App. C File Extensions 155

App. D Booktalks - They're Not Just for Libraries Anymore! 157

Index 159

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