TechniColor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life

Overview

The cultural impact of new information and communication technologies has been a constant topic of debate, but questions of race and ethnicity remain a critical absence. TechniColor fills this gap by exploring the relationship between race and technology.

From Indian H-1B Workers and Detroit techno music to karaoke and the Chicano interneta, TechniColor's specific case studies document the ways in which people of color actually use technology. The results rupture such racial ...

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Overview

The cultural impact of new information and communication technologies has been a constant topic of debate, but questions of race and ethnicity remain a critical absence. TechniColor fills this gap by exploring the relationship between race and technology.

From Indian H-1B Workers and Detroit techno music to karaoke and the Chicano interneta, TechniColor's specific case studies document the ways in which people of color actually use technology. The results rupture such racial stereotypes as Asian whiz-kids and Black and Latino techno-phobes, while fundamentally challenging many widely-held theoretical and political assumptions.

Incorporating a broader definition of technology and technological practices--to include not only those technologies thought to create "revolutions" (computer hardware and software) but also cars, cellular phones, and other everyday technologies--TechniColor reflects the larger history of technology use by people of color.

Contributors: Vivek Bald, Ben Chappell, Beth Coleman, McLean Greaves, Logan Hill, Alicia Headlam Hines, Karen Hossfeld, Amitava Kumar, Casey Man Kong Lum, Alondra Nelson, Mimi Nguyen, Guillermo Goméz-Peña, Tricia Rose, Andrew Ross, Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, and Ben Williams.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"New York's South Asian cabbies probably had no idea they were straddling the digital divide when they used their own CB channels to organize surprise strikes and demonstrations. But in Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life, the editors bring together a series of essays that broaden the concept far beyond the borders of your average two-part Times series."

-New York Magazine,

"What is revealed? Powerful visions, future-fantasies that as science fiction writer Nalo Hopkinson would argue, "can make the impossible, possible"

-Resource Center for CyberCulture Studies,

"Technicolor is at once heroic and tragic: an anthology that will prompt new conversations."

-C. Richard King ,Washington State University

New York Magazine
New York's South Asian cabbies probably had no idea they were straddling the digital divide when they used their own CB channels to organize surprise strikes and demonstrations. But in Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life, the editors bring together a series of essays that broaden the concept far beyond the borders of your average two-part Times series.
Booknews
With attention to the impact of computers, cars, cell phones, and other technological advances, the book presents a history of innovation by people of color. Eleven essays address the relationship between race and technology as it exists in numerous forms, including Indian H1B workers, Detroit techno music, karaoke, and the Chicano Interneta. These case studies move beyond the "digital divide" by documenting the ways in which people of color use and reconfigure technology in their communities and workplaces. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814736043
  • Publisher: New York University Press
  • Publication date: 3/1/2001
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.48 (w) x 8.78 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Meet the Author

Alondra Nelson is a Ph.D. candidate in the American Studies Program at New York University.

Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu is a Ph.D. candidate in the American Studies Program at New York University.

Alicia Headlam Hines teaches Literature and Language Arts at the Horace Mann School in Riverdale

Alicia Headlam Hines teaches Literature and Language Arts at the Horace Mann School in Riverdale, New York.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii
Introduction: Hidden Circuits 1
1 Beyond Access: Race, Technology, Community 13
2 "Their Logic against Them": Contradictions in Sex, Race, and Class in Silicon Valley 34
3 Net-Working: The Online Cultural Entrepreneur 64
4 Temporary Access: The Indian H-1B worker in the United States 76
5 Appropriating Technology 88
6 "Take a Little Trip with Me": Lowriding and the Poetics of Scale 100
7 Karaoke and the Construction of Identity 121
8 Sound Effects 142
9 Black Secret Technology: Detroit Techno and the Information Age 154
10 Tales of an Asiatic Geek Girl: Slant from Paper to Pixels 177
11 The Virtual Barrio @ the Other Frontier: (or The Chicano Interneta) 191
Contributors 199
Index 203
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