Technology And Place

Overview

Developing "sustainable" architectural and agricultural technologies was the intent behind Blueprint Farm, an experimental agricultural project designed to benefit farm workers displaced by the industrialization of agriculture in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Yet, despite its promise, the very institutions that created Blueprint Farm terminated the project after just four years (1987-1991).

In this book, Steven Moore demonstrates how the various stakeholders' competing ...

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Technology and Place: Sustainable Architecture and the Blueprint Farm

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Overview

Developing "sustainable" architectural and agricultural technologies was the intent behind Blueprint Farm, an experimental agricultural project designed to benefit farm workers displaced by the industrialization of agriculture in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Yet, despite its promise, the very institutions that created Blueprint Farm terminated the project after just four years (1987-1991).

In this book, Steven Moore demonstrates how the various stakeholders' competing definitions of "sustainability," "technology," and "place" ultimately doomed Blueprint Farm. He reconstructs the conflicting interests and goals of the founders, including Jim Hightower and the Texas Department of Agriculture, Laredo Junior College, and the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems, and shows how, ironically, they unwittingly suppressed the self-determination of the very farm workers the project sought to benefit. From the instructive failure of Blueprint Farm, Moore extracts eight principles for a regenerative architecture, which he calls his "nonmodern manifesto."

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What People Are Saying

John Agnew
I consider this book the most insightful discussion of place and technology I have encountered over the past twenty years of thinking about place and its role in modern society. . . . I think that it will create an intellectual stir and give a significant boost to scholarship bringing together social science and the design professions.
John Agnew, Professor and Chair of Geography, University of California, Los Angeles
John Agnew
I consider this book the most insightful discussion of place and technology I have encountered over the past twenty years of thinking about place and its role in modern society. . . . I think that it will create an intellectual stir and give a significant boost to scholarship bringing together social science and the design professions.
John Agnew
I consider this book the most insightful discussion of place and technology I have encountered over the past twenty years of thinking about place and its role in modern society. . . . I think that it will create an intellectual stir and give a significant boost to scholarship bringing together social science and the design professions.
—(John Agnew, Professor and Chair of Geography, University of California, Los Angeles)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780292752450
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • Publication date: 4/20/2001
  • Edition description: 1 ED
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword by Kenneth Frampton
Preface
Acknowledgments
Chapter 1. A Question of Categories
Modernity, Technology, and Place
Critical Regionalism
Toward a Nonmodern Alternative
Chapter 2. A Reconstruction from the File
Chapter 3. The Local History of Space
Place, Technology, and Technological Networks
La Frontera Chica
Narrowing Horizons of Spatial Discourse
Chapter 4. Conflicting Intentions
The Concept of Intentionality
Networks of Intention
Uninhabited Intentions
Chapter 5. Technological Interventions
Traditions in Science and Technology Studies
Making Problems Go Away
Democracy and Participation
Chapter 6. Reception
Reception Theory
Mixed Receptions
Received Paradigms
Chapter 7. Reproduction
The Production of Facts
Spreading Claims
Sublime Reproductions
Chapter 8. Eight Propositions
Summary Propositions
The Nonmodern Thesis
Eight Points for Regenerative Architecture: A Nonmodern Manifesto
Appendix. The Things Themselves
Notes
References
Index
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