Technology and the Future of Health Care: Preparing for the Next 30 Years / Edition 1

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Overview

Most experts believe that innovation in every aspect of patient care will be nothing less than astonishing as we move into the next century. Technology and the Future of Health Care brings together a remarkable group of health care visionaries who have identified and begun to analyze which trends and technological advances will likely shape and inform the next generation of medicine. From fundamental advances in computing and administration, research, nursing, and patient care delivery to noninvasive surgery, biomolecular therapies, bionics, and beyond, this ground-breaking book offers professional, executive-level insight into topics that until recently existed only in the realm of science fiction.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Jeffrey Rose
This book is a very interesting look at the potential effects of accelerating technical change of many kinds on healthcare delivery. There is the assumption that such accelerating change in technology will force similar acceleration in organizational change. It is largely and proudly conceptual in nature, written by multiple authors whose intent is to "change thinking" about technology issues in healthcare in the next thirty years. The purpose is to stimulate new ideas about technologic advantages and technology potential in healthcare as we advance our capabilities (somewhat science fictionally in many places), but not unrealistically given what is occurring today. Although the book is not purely about health informatics it is quite appealing to informaticists, but also to medical technophiles working toward a better health future. Emphasis is also fairly placed on the challenges associated with the costs and societal challenges of new technology, and the demands new technology will place on managers and executives who must embrace and implement the changes. This book is written for practitioners and leaders in healthcare organizations across all spectra, but the main aim is at healthcare leaders. The contributors are all credible and authoritative. There is a general overview of accelerating technologic changes and the trends towards smaller and more mobile devices, virtual reality modalities, and artificial intelligence. Predictions are made regarding speech and handwriting recognition, natural language processing and other advancements. The segment in Chapter 3 on databases and information is particularly important, as is all of chapter 7 on change processes associated withIT. Research and new forms of diagnosis and therapy are reviewed, including genomic factors, as are telemedicine, androids, and cyborgs. Ruff's concluding chapter on leadership, followership, and science is masterful. The book is easy to read and quite effective at stimulating thoughts about our collective healthcare future, and very much on track. This is a valuable and unusual foray into the healthcare future, well grounded, nicely edited, interestingly written, and worthy of praise. Even though it is often conceptual and futuristic, it is balanced with observation of past developments. The author does conveniently leave out discussion of the more concrete and practical processes that will accompany the change, or even create it, but he certainly provides an interesting road map to the future. The kicker in all this futuristic thinking is the costs associated with the new technologies, versus their effectiveness and our ability to pay for the new methods.
Booknews
Technical-trend writer Ellis projects the rate of technological development over the past three decades into the next three decades of the health care industry. He argues that the most visible changes in medicine, such as MRI, CAT, and PET scanners, are not as important in the long run as the streamlining of the administration of hospitals and doctor's offices, enabling more efficient processing and storage of patient medical and billing records. He also calls on five professionals from the industry to reveal their perspectives. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Jeffrey S. Rose, MD (Private Practice)
Description: This book is a very interesting look at the potential effects of accelerating technical change of many kinds on healthcare delivery. There is the assumption that such accelerating change in technology will force similar acceleration in organizational change. It is largely and proudly conceptual in nature, written by multiple authors whose intent is to "change thinking" about technology issues in healthcare in the next thirty years.
Purpose: The purpose is to stimulate new ideas about technologic advantages and technology potential in healthcare as we advance our capabilities (somewhat science fictionally in many places), but not unrealistically given what is occurring today. Although the book is not purely about health informatics it is quite appealing to informaticists, but also to medical technophiles working toward a better health future. Emphasis is also fairly placed on the challenges associated with the costs and societal challenges of new technology, and the demands new technology will place on managers and executives who must embrace and implement the changes.
Audience: This book is written for practitioners and leaders in healthcare organizations across all spectra, but the main aim is at healthcare leaders. The contributors are all credible and authoritative.
Features: There is a general overview of accelerating technologic changes and the trends towards smaller and more mobile devices, virtual reality modalities, and artificial intelligence. Predictions are made regarding speech and handwriting recognition, natural language processing and other advancements. The segment in Chapter 3 on databases and information is particularly important, as is all of chapter 7 on change processes associated with IT. Research and new forms of diagnosis and therapy are reviewed, including genomic factors, as are telemedicine, androids, and cyborgs. Ruff's concluding chapter on leadership, followership, and science is masterful. The book is easy to read and quite effective at stimulating thoughts about our collective healthcare future, and very much on track.
Assessment: This is a valuable and unusual foray into the healthcare future, well grounded, nicely edited, interestingly written, and worthy of praise. Even though it is often conceptual and futuristic, it is balanced with observation of past developments. The author does conveniently leave out discussion of the more concrete and practical processes that will accompany the change, or even create it, but he certainly provides an interesting road map to the future. The kicker in all this futuristic thinking is the costs associated with the new technologies, versus their effectiveness and our ability to pay for the new methods.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Jeffrey S. Rose, MD (Private Practice)
Description: This book is a very interesting look at the potential effects of accelerating technical change of many kinds on healthcare delivery. There is the assumption that such accelerating change in technology will force similar acceleration in organizational change. It is largely and proudly conceptual in nature, written by multiple authors whose intent is to "change thinking" about technology issues in healthcare in the next thirty years.
Purpose: The purpose is to stimulate new ideas about technologic advantages and technology potential in healthcare as we advance our capabilities (somewhat science fictionally in many places), but not unrealistically given what is occurring today. Although the book is not purely about health informatics it is quite appealing to informaticists, but also to medical technophiles working toward a better health future. Emphasis is also fairly placed on the challenges associated with the costs and societal challenges of new technology, and the demands new technology will place on managers and executives who must embrace and implement the changes.
Audience: This book is written for practitioners and leaders in healthcare organizations across all spectra, but the main aim is at healthcare leaders. The contributors are all credible and authoritative.
Features: There is a general overview of accelerating technologic changes and the trends towards smaller and more mobile devices, virtual reality modalities, and artificial intelligence. Predictions are made regarding speech and handwriting recognition, natural language processing and other advancements. The segment in Chapter 3 on databases and information is particularly important, as is all of chapter 7 on change processes associated with IT. Research and new forms of diagnosis and therapy are reviewed, including genomic factors, as are telemedicine, androids, and cyborgs. Ruff's concluding chapter on leadership, followership, and science is masterful. The book is easy to read and quite effective at stimulating thoughts about our collective healthcare future, and very much on track.
Assessment: This is a valuable and unusual foray into the healthcare future, well grounded, nicely edited, interestingly written, and worthy of praise. Even though it is often conceptual and futuristic, it is balanced with observation of past developments. The author does conveniently leave out discussion of the more concrete and practical processes that will accompany the change, or even create it, but he certainly provides an interesting road map to the future. The kicker in all this futuristic thinking is the costs associated with the new technologies, versus their effectiveness and our ability to pay for the new methods.

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780787957377
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 3/28/2001
  • Series: J-B AHA Press Series , #47
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 0.75 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author

David Ellis
David Ellis

David Ellis's previous novels include In the Company of Liars, Jury of One, Life Sentence, and Line of Vision, for which he won an Edgar Award. An attorney from Chicago, he serves as Counsel to the Speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives.

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Table of Contents

About the Authors v
About the References and Notes ix
Acknowledgments xi
Introduction xiii
Part 1 Trends in Technology
Chapter 1 The Rate of Change 3
Chapter 2 Fundamental Trends in Technology 17
Chapter 3 Trends in Administration and Control 43
Chapter 4 Advances in Research Methods 69
Chapter 5 Emerging Products and Services 97
Chapter 6 Androids and Cyborgs 121
Chapter 7 Preparing for the Future 139
Part 2 Professional Perspectives
Chapter 8 The Process of the Health Care Encounter 155
Chapter 9 Impact of Technology on Nursing Care 181
Chapter 10 Hospitals and the Forces of Change 193
Chapter 11 A Payer's Perspective on the Future 209
Chapter 12 Leadership, Followship, and Science 231
Chapter 13 Epilogue: A Postscript on Progress 251
Index 255
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