TechnoStress: Coping with Technology Work Home Play

Overview

Modern technology was designed to empower us and set us free. So why do we often feel more like its slaves than its masters? From pagers to Web sites, e-mail to fax machines, each new "techno-helper" places greater demands on us. In this book, psychologist Michelle Weil and educator Larry Rosen explain why technology makes people feel under the gun - and how to preserve your humanity and sanity in a digital world. But for all of the problems it identifies, TechnoStress is not another polemic against technology. ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (23) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $1.99   
  • Used (20) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(95)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1997 Hardcover New Ships Fast! Satisfaction Guaranteed!

Ships from: Skokie, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$16.03
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(129)

Condition: New
1997-09-25 Hardcover New New Condition. Clean crisp tight copy, no marks or tears. Email Notification. Satisfaction Guaranteed.

Ships from: manhattan beach, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(181)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Modern technology was designed to empower us and set us free. So why do we often feel more like its slaves than its masters? From pagers to Web sites, e-mail to fax machines, each new "techno-helper" places greater demands on us. In this book, psychologist Michelle Weil and educator Larry Rosen explain why technology makes people feel under the gun - and how to preserve your humanity and sanity in a digital world. But for all of the problems it identifies, TechnoStress is not another polemic against technology. In fact, the authors are proponents for technology. "Technotherapist" Michelle Weil and researcher Larry Rosen have spent the past two decades showing people how to thrive in the age of high-tech. Rather than teaching you how to avoid technology, they show you how to make it work for you.

"...offers proven tools & techniques for coping with technology...practical strategies to take back control of your life & reduce anxiety...guidelines how to adapt technology to serve your needs rather than vice-versa."

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The husband-wife team of Rosen and Weil use the leverage of 15 years' worth of research to show us how technology stresses us out and what can be done to rectify the situation. Problems addressed include the myth of technological ease, the speed expected of workers in a technological society, the dangers of communicating solely by e-mail, corporate technostress, the question of boundaries in a virtual world, and control issues in small businesses and home offices. Numerous tips to avoid technostress are given throughout the text, along with quizzes and checklists to spot trouble in your life or the life of someone you know. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
From The Critics
Remember the simple life, before technology? That was a long, long time ago. Technology, in various forms, has been inour lives for many years. More recently, however, technology has combined with an increased velocity in the pace of our lives, causing considerable stress: technostress.

Who better to write about this phenomenon than a technology consultant and a psychologist-turned-researcher? What a team for the topic! The integration of their work was obvious and appropriate throughout the book. Weil and Rosen explain in understandable phrasing the origins of our technostress at work, at home, at play and in society overall. But, they don't stop there. The authors also explain in careful steps what to do to control technostress to lead more comfortable, yet productive, lives.

Weil and Rosen help us understand that 80-90 percent of us are not embracing all this technology as rapidly as we all think we (everyone else) are. "Because technology is being thrust upon them at a pace and volume greater than they desire, this vast majority of the populace is also experiencing technostress." It is easy to see how technology has taken over our lives,

the authors observe, as they note that technological intrusion has come from more than the ubiquitous computer. While addressing e-mail issues, they also acknowledge the impact of the microwave, television, the VCR, hand-held poker games,

calculators, electronic fish-finders, and automated doggie door openers that respond to a signal from the dog's collar.

Boundaries become critically important in this technology-charged environment. We long for the "good old days" when work stopped at a predetermined hour and we were able to move into our personal and family lives. Now technology has allowed, even encouraged, intrusions into all aspects of our lives-from the other aspects. Pagers chirp interruptions from work during family time; family phone calls or e-mails find us during our work time. The authors remind us that "people have a clear need for their role boundaries to be respected if they are to maneuver successfully through their complex lives."

Then, they provide their readers with advice and counsel about how to make that happen. We need to reclaim our space to reduce our technostress.

I'm writing this review on a cross-country airplane trip-conscious that I'm using technology (my laptop computer) to exercise my efficiency. Yet, at the same time, I'm enjoying the serenity of freedom from ringing telephones, insistent pages,

unwanted noise (I don't have to use the headphones), and the siren song of e-mail. I'm in control!

We have become technodependent. "We [even] invade our own space by making check-in calls to our equipment. We don't feel safe without electronic connection-even though the process is disruptive and can be irritating." We send messages, then wait for return messages. If we don't get prompt responses from voicemail or e-mail messages, we become anxious . . . even paranoid. Are we being ignored? Did the message get through? Is the recipient all right? Angry with us? And here comes the psychological teaching-"we are missing the two main ingredients for successful communication: connection between two people and exchange of accurate information." We don't get closure and that causes technostress.

The demands of unmanaged technology-the technology that manages us-can easily surround us 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. There's no relief, no opportunity to get needed "downtime. "Our nervous systems are perpetually excited. It's like being in a constant state of red alert. Humans need downtime, internal peacefulness, and uninterrupted sleep. The body needs to heal, rejuvenate, and keep its immune systems operational in order to fend off illness. Without these things, people become sick, cranky, depressed, anxious, distracted, and technostressed. This said, the authors again remind us that we control our lives-we control technology and its impact on is.

The authors also raise the issue of privacy, now a much greater concern in our lives. E-mail, cellular phone conversations,

our buying patterns can all be monitored without our knowledge-are we ever safe? We can reduce our technostress. As the authors counsel, "Empowered by knowledge, we can make choices." This book is full of helpful and practical knowledge. It made a difference for me, and it can make a difference for you.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471177098
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/25/1997
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 239
  • Product dimensions: 5.79 (w) x 8.78 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Table of Contents

1 How TechnoStressed Are You? 1
2 The Myth of Technological Ease 27
3 Where Are the Boundaries in a Virtual World? 49
4 Reach Out and Touch Someone? 71
5 Running at Warp(ed) Speed 99
6 Two Kids, a Dog, and a Computer 125
7 Whos's Really Running Your Small Business or Home Office? 155
8 Corporate TechnoStress 175
9 Our TechnoStressed Society 205
Selected Readings 221
Index 233
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)