Ted Kennedy: Scenes from an Epic Life

Ted Kennedy: Scenes from an Epic Life

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by Boston Globe

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The extraordinary life of senator Edward Moore Kennedy captures two vivid stories: one is of an iconic senator who experienced the greatest of triumphs and the most devastating of losses, and the other is a chronicle of the most dramatic moments in our recent American history, including the assassination of a president and the struggle for civil rights. Through

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The extraordinary life of senator Edward Moore Kennedy captures two vivid stories: one is of an iconic senator who experienced the greatest of triumphs and the most devastating of losses, and the other is a chronicle of the most dramatic moments in our recent American history, including the assassination of a president and the struggle for civil rights. Through more than two hundred stunning black-and-white photographs pulled from the pages of The Boston Globe and its extensive archives, Ted Kennedy: Scenes from an Epic Life provides a gorgeous visual account of Ted's incredible journey from his joyous birth to the tragic announcement of his battle with brain cancer, including highlights from his childhood in New York, Hyannis Port, and London; his days at Harvard and in the Senate; and his roles as devoted brother, husband, father, uncle, and grandfather. In this unique collection, archival materials and fresh interviews combine to create a richly detailed portrait of the man known to many as Uncle Ted. Vibrant photographs, most never before published in book form (and many unseen for decades), as well as essays and quotations illustrate the man and the statesman from a perspective that is both intimate and objective. It is a collection in which Ted's closest and keenest observers provide the context necessary to appreciate his place in this most famous of American families. Here you will find, among the many unforgettable photographs featured in these pages, contributions by such illustrious names as Stan Grossfeld, Ulrike Welsch, Ollie Noonan Jr., Paul J. Connell, and Ted Dully. Featured essays include the reflections of the Globe's former Washington bureau chief, Martin F. Nolan, and longtime photojournalist Bill Brett. Their images and words bear eyewitness testimony that will resonate with anyone who lived through the Camelot years or simply seeks to understand the Kennedy mystique. Ted Kennedy: Scenes from an Epic Life has no equal because Ted Kennedy's long, complicated relationship with the press has no equal. It is the rarest kind of pictorial history: it is history in the making.

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Simon & Schuster
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by Senator John Kerry

There's a revealing contradiction in this photographic project because the life, the liberalism, the love, and the loss -- the story of Ted Kennedy -- has never stopped at the frame's edge.

The Kennedy family will forever be associated with the words of Tennyson; but perhaps more than any other, it's Ted who gave new life to the old poet's line, "I am a part of all that I have met." No portrait of Ted Kennedy is complete without all those whose lives are forever enriched by his life's work -- the sick, the poor, the elderly, the disabled -- for whom, as the Boston Globe once declared, "in actual, measurable impact on the lives of tens of millions of working families...Ted belongs in the same sentence with Franklin Roosevelt."

And there's something unmistakably genuine, beautifully private, wholly authentic -- that word overused in American politics but thoroughly Ted in every way -- in the fact that this giant touched so many of those lives when the cameras were nowhere to be found. There are countless stories of friends who, facing a grim diagnosis, found Ted Kennedy personally working the phones to doctors across the globe on their behalf; of political adversaries and ideological opposites who benefited from Ted's compassion, men like George Wallace, who found Ted Kennedy intimately involved in his rehabilitation from a paralyzing gunshot wound; and the folks Ted met along the way -- the child in a wheelchair whose hand Ted held for a long while in the hall of the Russell Senate Office Building on his way to a vote; the old man from Leominster, Massachusetts, oxygen tank by his bedside, whom Ted stopped to sit with in the hospital time after time; and, yes, the straggly haired, angry Vietnam vets facing possible arrest and political threats from the Nixon administration, whom Ted visited in April 1971, while other prominent politicians stayed away.

To appreciate fully the greatness of Senator Ted Kennedy is to understand that behind each snapshot, there has always been a heroic steadfastness. Behind the liberal lion who roared -- gloriously -- "the dream shall never die" is a lifetime spent in tireless service to the creed that "circumstances may change, but the work of compassion must continue." Day after day, decade after decade, Ted Kennedy has lived and legislated according to this creed, amassing a record of groundbreaking legislation equal to that of any United States senator in 232 years of American history.

Behind each flash photograph of Ted smiling, surrounded by dignitaries, heads of state, fellow politicians, brothers and sisters, cousins and nephews, there are countless stories of dear and faithful friendship. On Inauguration Day 2005, it was Teddy and Vicki who arrived first at my family's home in Washington and lightened a day we'd all hoped might have been different. Each photograph of a warm embrace is testament to a friend who was always there by our side when the sun wasn't shining, but who seemed always -- for our benefit -- to have the sunlight in his face, that beaming smile and unmistakable baritone. Among his not-so-secret weapons have always been great humility, good humor, and a genuine affection for friends and strangers alike. His brother Robert once said that "all great questions must be raised by great voices." Ted's singing notwithstanding, the cause of American idealism knows no greater voice than that of this youngest Kennedy brother.

These photos capture his journey from the youngest of nine children to the patriarch and custodian of American liberalism and also our nation's journey from the "new frontier" to "new hope" to "the audacity of hope." It is the long, impressive, and enduring story of a great American life.

John F. Kerry has represented Massachusetts in the U.S. Senate since 1985 and was the Democratic nominee for president in 2004. A high school volunteer for Kennedy's first Senate race in 1962, Kerry became reacquainted with Senator Kennedy in 1971 as a Vietnam veteran testifying against the war before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. In January 2009, Kerry became the committee's chairman. Copyright © 2009 by the Boston Globe

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Ted Kennedy: Scenes from an Epic Life 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book very much
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE looking at these pictures, they are absolutely beautiful. I think that even if the reader has no interest in the Kennedy family or Ted Kennedy specifically anyone would enjoy this book just for the photography. These pictures are beautifully cataloged and give insight into a very interesting family. The pictures really are stunning!