Teddy Roosevelt's Elk

Teddy Roosevelt's Elk

by Brenda Z. Guiberson, Patrick O'Brien
     
 

It is 1897. As Teddy Roosevelt breaks camp on the western plains, an elk calf is born in the Olympic Mountains. Nearby, a great bull sharpens his antlers, bobwhites call from the sage grass, and a waterfall glitters in the sunlight. In the coming year, the calf will learn much about survival. It will also be a year of enlightenment for Teddy Roosevelt. Soon to

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Overview

It is 1897. As Teddy Roosevelt breaks camp on the western plains, an elk calf is born in the Olympic Mountains. Nearby, a great bull sharpens his antlers, bobwhites call from the sage grass, and a waterfall glitters in the sunlight. In the coming year, the calf will learn much about survival. It will also be a year of enlightenment for Teddy Roosevelt. Soon to become one of the most beloved leaders of the United States, Roosevelt will take steps to conserve the wild places and animals of America so that future generations may enjoy them, too.

This is a story not only about the magnificent elk, but also about an important chapter in American history, an introduction to one of the most influential pioneers of the modern conservation movement, President Theodore Roosevelt.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Framed by two episodes set during the early 1880s that feature Roosevelt and read as though culled from his journals, the text follows a fictitious elk cow, her calf, and a mature bull through a year....Attractive...provide[s] a goodly amount of useful information."—School Library Journal

School Library Journal
Gr 3-5Roosevelt Elk, named in honor of Theodore Roosevelt, are the largest existing subspecies. Framed by two episodes set during the early 1880s that feature Roosevelt and read as though culled from his journals, the text follows a fictitious elk cow, her calf, and a mature bull through a year in the Olympic Mountains of Washington state. Elk lifestyles have not changed much in the intervening century (except where the animals and humans share an uneasy coexistence), though the wolf pack in the text has been subsequently hunted out of the area described, so details on behavior, food, etc., are still accurate. Guiberson provides an author's note to flesh out Roosevelt's conservation actions in the U.S., as he created wildlife refuges, national parks and monuments, and forests to preserve the wilderness he had come to love during his sojourn in the West. O'Brien's fine realistic oil paintings provide a rich visual accompaniment completely coordinated to the readable text. Not written with report researchers in mind, this attractive book does provide a goodly amount of useful information, much in the manner of Guiberson's previous works, Cactus Hotel (1991) and Spoonbill Swamp (1992, both Holt).Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805042962
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
09/28/1997
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.34(w) x 9.36(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
5 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Brenda Z. Guiberson has written several books for children, including Cactus Hotel and Spoonbill Swamp, both illustrated by Megan Lloyd, and Into the Sea, illustrated by Alix Berenzy. Ms. Guiberson lives in Seattle, Washington, just across the sound from Olympic National Park, the home to many of Teddy Roosevelt's elk.

Patrick O'Brien is the illustrator of A Wasp Is Not a Bee by Marilyn Singer. Mr. O'Brien makes his home in Baltimore, Maryland.

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