Teen Titans Vol. 2: The Culling (The New 52) by Scott Lobdell, Brett Booth |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Teen Titans Vol. 2: The Culling (The New 52)

Teen Titans Vol. 2: The Culling (The New 52)

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by Scott Lobdell, Brett Booth
     
 

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As a part of the acclaimed DC Comics—The New 52 event, this second volume of Teen Titans launches the mini-event "The Culling" featuring Superboy and Legion Lost!

When the organization known as N.O.W.H.E.R.E. captures Superboy, the Teen Titans, and Legion Lost and pits the young heroes against each other to weed out the weak, it will take everything the most

Overview

As a part of the acclaimed DC Comics—The New 52 event, this second volume of Teen Titans launches the mini-event "The Culling" featuring Superboy and Legion Lost!

When the organization known as N.O.W.H.E.R.E. captures Superboy, the Teen Titans, and Legion Lost and pits the young heroes against each other to weed out the weak, it will take everything the most famous teen heroes of the DC Universe have to save themselves from eachother. But the ruthless Harvest won't give up easily leading to one of the young heroes making the ultimate sacrifice for the others.

Collects Teen Titans #8-12, 0 and DC Comics Presents #12.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Teen Tians Vol. 1:

"Grade: A. Brett Booth's illustrations, reminiscent of early 1990s superhero art, works for the book's youthful, kinetic heroes, and works for potential teen readers willing to take this superhero comic for a spin on their iPads."—USA Today
 
 "Booth offers a kinetic approach that drips with energy."—IGN

"It finds a great equilibrium between the fun that made many of us first pick up comics, and the narrative strength that kept us reading them."—PopMatters

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401241032
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
06/25/2013
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
64,407
Product dimensions:
6.72(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Scott Lobdell is a veteran of the comic book industry, having worked with nearly every major American comic book publisher. Lobdell is best known for his work on Marvel's X-Men franchise in the 1990's, penning such works as Uncanny X-Men, Excalibur, The Age of Apocalypse, Generation X, amongst others. He is currently the writer of SUPERBOY, TEEN TITANS, and RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS, each a part of DC Comics—The New 52.

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Teen Titans Vol. 2: The Culling (The New 52) 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MereChristian More than 1 year ago
The <i>DC Comics</i> &ldquo;New 52&rdquo; iteration of the young superheroes known as the Teen Titans continues with <i>Teen Titans, Vol. 2: The Culling</i> . I must start by stating how this is a very bad title. The first two issues of this collection are a part of the cross-over event known as &ldquo;the Culling&rdquo;, but that is it. The issue seems to be split into three parts: the end of the Culling event, a weird adventure with Kid Flash that I can't possibly figure just <i>where</i> or <i>how</i> it fits into the <i>Teen Titans</i> comic or the larger <i>DC Comics</i> universe, and an adventure with Superboy, Red Robin and Wonder Girl that ends with what seems to be a lead-in to the Batman family cross-over, &ldquo;Death of the Family&rdquo;. The best story was the Wonder Girl two-parter, which told her origin story, and made some movement on the attraction between her and Red Robin. In fact, the volume was enjoyable over all, but it still had some issues. The stories were so disjointed and were used to complete or contribute to story arcs for other titles. In other words, it had the same problems I identified in my review of <i>Batgirl, Vol. 2: Knightfall Descends</i> that that comic had, but without the same overall theme tying everything together. Well, maybe one could push it and say that it had the trust and feelings of the new team learning to work together as a theme, but that would be a stretch. What saved this volume was the artwork and the fact that, even slightly messed up due to editorial mandates, the writers of the comic know their craft. They can tell a terrific tale. They really establish these superhuman (and in the case of Red Robin, super-trained) characters as real people you just naturally find yourself wanting to root for. And as for the artwork, well, it is gorgeous, with the characters drawn beautifully. This book should have been a great volume of comics, but it's disjointed structure just made it a bit of a mess, and not nearly as good as it could have been.