Teen Torment: Overcoming Verbal Abuse at Home and at School

Teen Torment: Overcoming Verbal Abuse at Home and at School

by Patricia Evans
     
 

Ask teens and they'll confirm it-verbal abuse is "a fact of teen life." From simple put-downs to hate-filled "trash talking," teens are drowning in a sea of poisoned words. How can it be stopped?See more details below

Overview

Ask teens and they'll confirm it-verbal abuse is "a fact of teen life." From simple put-downs to hate-filled "trash talking," teens are drowning in a sea of poisoned words. How can it be stopped?

Editorial Reviews

Newsweek
A groundbreaking new book.
Library Journal
With these two titles, the genre on navigating adolescence continues to grow but gets no boost. The publisher is comparing Blanco's story with Dave Pelzer's A Child Called "It," but that's inaccurate, for it lacks that book's honest writing. A public relations agent, Blanco writes about growing up a misfit and reject, constantly tormented by her classmates. Never really fitting in, she moved from school to school in the Chicago suburbs, with verbal abuse soon turning into physical abuse. Then, when Blanco was 16, her parents decided to vacation in Greece, and they flew the next day (what about passports?). She met a guy in his "quaint" club and spilled her life story, including problems with her asymmetrical breasts (one huge, one tiny). She then shed her bra so that he could admire her lopsided chest. Back home for breast surgery and her senior year, she was soon driving one of Dad's company cars (!) to school. Though she was a proud, God-fearing "good girl," she turned assertive, even muttering "Screw you!" to one of her enemies. On to New York University, a public relations career, and back to a high school reunion to see all the kids who had tormented her-and more bizarre fodder. With too much in this memoir failing to ring true, and much of it sounding preposterous, readers have no reason to sympathize with the author. In her latest book, consultant and speaker Evans (The Verbally Abusive Relationship) turns to teenagers with the goal of identifying verbal abuse and stopping it, but she is long-winded, repetitive, and self-serving. Too many generalities get in the way of facts here; and lists with examples of abuse and ways to respond are mostly useless. For example, Evans suggests that one fire back the comment, "That's silly talk," which hardly constitutes teen lingo. Verbal abuse always precedes violence, she claims, but this is not supported with facts. The chapters on where to find abuse (in media, sports, the home, and school) could have been lumped into one. Finally, in the text and in the slim bibliography, Evans recommends her own books and her own web site. Libraries are much better off with Rachel Simmons's Odd Girl Out and Rosalind Wiseman's Queen Bees and Wannabes. Neither of these new books is recommended.-Linda Beck, Indian Valley P.L., Telford, PA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781580628457
Publisher:
Adams Media Corporation
Publication date:
02/01/2003
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.58(w) x 8.48(h) x 0.97(d)

What People are saying about this

Sonya Friedman
A great, great book.
— CNN for The Verbally Abusive Relationship
Anne Rule
Great advice about how to stand up for yourself!
— author of Every Breath You Take, for Controlling People

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >