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The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education
     

The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education

4.6 5
by Grace Llewellyn
 
An estimated 700,000 American children are now taught at home. This book tells teens how to take control of their lives and get a "real life." Young people can reclaim their natural ability to teach themselves and design a personalized education program. Grace Llewellyn explains the entire process, from making the decision to quit school, to discovering the learning

Overview

An estimated 700,000 American children are now taught at home. This book tells teens how to take control of their lives and get a "real life." Young people can reclaim their natural ability to teach themselves and design a personalized education program. Grace Llewellyn explains the entire process, from making the decision to quit school, to discovering the learning opportunities available.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Cindy Lombardo
Llewellyn's first edition (Lowry House, 1991/VOYA April 1992) was an eye-opening and thought-provoking diatribe about the evils of formal education and the advantages of "unschooling"-a term preferable to "quitting school" or "homeschooling." The first book, written specifically for teens, to tackle the full range of issues associated with the movement away from the classroom and into the real world, it rapidly gained a wide and enthusiastic following among homeschoolers as well as autodidact wannabes. This second edition (updated to include an international component) continues the crusade to open the floodgates of independent learning and encourages young adults to determine for themselves how best to satisfy their intellectual curiosity. Quoting liberally from John Holt's books as well as students and parents who have opted out of the formal education system, Llewellyn offers a step-by-step approach that could serve as a lifeline for those interested in unschooling but uncertain of where to begin. Informative and entertaining chapters include material on legal issues, how to find inexpensive and creative ways to incorporate learning with daily life, the use of volunteerism and travel as educational experiences, and the receptivity to unschooling in other countries. A wealth of resources offer additional reading suggestions, Web sites, addresses, phone numbers, and an eclectic bibliography. Examples of real kids who left school, developed and implemented their own plans for learning, and became successful and happy in a wide variety of fields should dispel notions that only a formal college degree can guarantee financial security. Young adults will appreciate the tone of the book, which has the flavor of getting the straight scoop from a rebellious older sister or favorite aunt. In the words of one young patron, "this book is awesome!" Why not donate a copy to your local junior high and high school libraries? Index. Biblio. Source Notes. Appendix. VOYA Codes: 4Q 4P J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses, Broad general YA appeal, Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9 and Senior High-defined as grades 10 to 12).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781862041042
Publisher:
Thorsons/Element
Publication date:
09/10/1997
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.49(h) x 0.88(d)

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Teenage Liberation Handbook 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a compilation of a numbers of reviews written by teacher education students from Bowling Green State University (Education in a Pluralistic Society course, Fall 2000, Professor A. Sidorkin). MANY FOUND THE BOOK TO BE THOUGHT-PROVOKING AND ENGAGING: ¿Throughout reading this book I've tried to keep an open mind about the concept Llewellyn has written about. Even though I do not agree with her at all, she has been able to pose some interesting thoughts and ideas. One strength of her book is that she does a great job at relating it to teenagers, which is whom the book is intended for. She uses simple, straight to the point language to get her points across. She also uses numerous thoughts that have been written strictly by teenagers to enforce the idea that the book is for their benefit.¿ ¿She discusses matters of freedom, how students best learn, and the different problem areas of compulsory schooling¿ Her topic is interesting, unique, and supported by many real-life situations provided by unschoolers and their families.¿ ¿I give Ms. Llewellyn much credit for going out in a society where structure and formal schooling are valued and accepted as the norm and writing this book.¿ ¿Overall, the book made some excellent points that I wouldn't have thought about.¿ ¿Reading Llewellyn's book was very interesting and it made me think about a lot of different things and helped me really put them into perspective even if I didn't agree at something she was talking about.¿ ¿The author arouses a wide range of emotions in readers with her dissection of the present learning environment in our public and private schools.¿ ¿The author speaks from the perspective of an individual that has seen the darkest side of the educational institution and has real and genuine concern for the products of that system.¿ ¿Repeatedly explaining the unschooled track is not for everyone, she still believes in the innate curiosity, the desire of all young people to want to learn better and more. Indeed, Llewellyn brings out some interesting points and backs them up with her own experiences that kids could relate with.¿ ¿And for someone like me who is in education because my whole heart is poured out for my children then shouldn't we give her the courtesy to listen, and perhaps applaud her passion for preserving that beautiful thing we as Americans call freedom. Freedom for thinking her thoughts, freedom for expressing them, and freedom for printing them.¿ YET MANY REVIEWERS EXPRESSED A CONCERN ABOUT BOOK¿S BIASES AND LACK OF EVIDENCE: ¿She spends a quick few pages on the ways homeschoolers do get involved socially but does not go into depth about the topic. The way she approached some of these important topics made me think that she knew they were missing for homeschoolers and tried to bypass them.¿ ¿However, in her attempt to endorse the merit of 'unschooling,' Llewellyn fails to accurately and substantially support both its advantages and drawbacks. She riddles her chapters with case study after case study of well-rounded, happy, adjusted, unschooled teenagers, but never once includes a case study describing a young person whom the unschooling system failed. Am I to assume that no such stories exist? ¿ ¿On the contrary, she tends to be a bit unrealistic in her ideas and does not quite have enough evidence of this method of home schooling working in the lives of students. The reader is never told where home schooled teenagers have gone since their home school experience. We receive little information about the outcomes of these kids.¿ ¿I give Ms. Llewellyn much credit for going out in a society where structure and formal schooling are valued and accepted as the norm and writing this book. However, she fails to accomplish her goal of persuading teenagers to successfully and confidently educate themselves.¿ ¿I think that as a reviewer I must warn you as the reader that your are about to en