BN.com Gift Guide

Tehanu (Earthsea Series #4)

( 34 )

Overview

Years before, they had escaped together from the sinister Tombs of Atuan — she, an isolated young priestess, he, a powerful wizard. Now she is a farmer's widow, having chosen for herself the simple pleasures of an ordinary life. And he is a broken old man, mourning the powers lost to him not by choice.
A lifetime ago, they helped each other at a time of darkness and danger. Now they must join forces again, to help another — the physically and ...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback - Repackage)
$7.67
BN.com price
(Save 4%)$7.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (59) from $1.99   
  • New (17) from $2.45   
  • Used (42) from $1.99   
Tehanu (Earthsea Series #4)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$8.99
BN.com price

Overview

Years before, they had escaped together from the sinister Tombs of Atuan — she, an isolated young priestess, he, a powerful wizard. Now she is a farmer's widow, having chosen for herself the simple pleasures of an ordinary life. And he is a broken old man, mourning the powers lost to him not by choice.
A lifetime ago, they helped each other at a time of darkness and danger. Now they must join forces again, to help another — the physically and emotionally scarred child whose own destiny remains to be revealed.
With millions of copies sold, Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea Cycle has earned a treasured place on the shelves of fantasy lovers everywhere. Complex, innovative, and deeply moral, this quintessential fantasy sequence has been compared with the work of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, and has helped make Le Guin one of the most distinguished fantasy and science fiction writers of all time. She lives in Portland, Oregon.

When Sparrowhawk, the Archmage of Earthsea, returns from the dark land stripped of his magic powers, he finds refuge with the aging widow Tenar and a crippled girl child who carries an unknown destiny.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"New and longtime Earthsea fans will be drawn to these impressive new editions."
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The publication of Tehanu will give lovers of LeGuin's enchanted realm of Earthsea cause for celebration. In Tehanu , LeGuin spins a bittersweet tale of Tenar and Ged, familiar characters from the classic Earthsea trilogy. Tenar, now a widow facing obscurity and loneliness, rescues a badly burned girl from her abusive parents. The girl, it turns out, will be an important power in the new age dawning on Earthsea. Ged, now broken, is learning how to live with the great loss he suffered at the end of the trilogy. Tenar's struggle to protect and nurture a defenseless child and Ged's slow recovery make painful but thrilling reading. Sharply defined characterizations give rich resonance to Tehanu 's themes of aging, feminism and child abuse as well as its emotional chords of grief and loss. Tehanu is a heartbreaking farewell to a world that is passing, and is full of tantalizing hints of the new world to come. Fans of the Earthsea trilogy will be deeply moved. Ages 12-up. Feb.
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-- Tenar, once priestess of Atuan and now the middle-aged widow of a Gontish farmer, lives quietly, caring for her foster daughter Therru, a child who has been abused and badly burned by her own parents. Soon there is another who needs Tenar's care; Ged, no longer Archmage of Earthsea, returns to his homeland borne half-conscious on a dragon's back, all his power spent in closing the door between the worlds of Life and Death as detailed in the climactic scenes of The Farthest Shore Atheneum, 1972. The Kingship has been restored, but there is still evil in the world, and, even as Ged slowly returns to health, Tenar and Therru are threatened. In the end, it is Therru with her unexpected kinship to dragons who turns aside this evil--and raises new questions for readers as to whether Therru is a child, a dragon, or a new type of being entirely. LeGuin's effortless mastery of language will be familiar to readers of the Earthsea Trilogy, but the sweeping otherworldliness of those books has been replaced by a more human focus. The pace is slower, the tone more meditative. The ``power'' of the earlier books was purely an abstract force wielded by wizards--here it also resides in human relationships. In losing his wizard's power, Ged gains the power to return Tenar's love. Newcomers to LeGuin's imagined world may find the story slow going at first; those familiar with Earthsea, however, will rejoice as they enter it once again. --Ruth S. Vose, San Francisco Public Library
The Horn Book
"New and longtime Earthsea fans will be drawn to these impressive new editions."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689845338
  • Publisher: Saga Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2001
  • Series: Earthsea Series , #4
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Repackage
  • Edition number: 2001
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 241,879
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.30 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Ursula K.  Le Guin

Ursula K. Le Guin is one of the most distinguished fantasy and science fiction writers of all time. She has won numerous awards for her work, including the Nebula Award, the Hugo Award, the National Book Award, and the Newbery Honor. She lives in Portland, Oregon. Visit her online at UrsulaKLeguin.com.

Biography

Speculative fiction, magic realism, "slipstream" fiction -- all these terms could apply to the works of Ursula K. Le Guin. Unfortunately, none was in common use when she started writing in the early 1960s. As a young writer, Le Guin weathered seven years of rejections from editors who praised her novels' elegant prose but were puzzled by their content. At a time when the only literary fiction was realistic fiction, as Le Guin later told an interviewer for The Register-Guard in Portland, Oregon, "There just wasn't a pigeonhole for what I write."

At long last, two of her stories were accepted for publication, one at a literary journal and one at a science-fiction magazine. The literary journal paid her in copies of the journal; the science-fiction magazine paid $30. She told The Register-Guard, "I thought: 'Oooohhh! They'll call what I write science fiction, will they? And they'll pay me for it? Well, here we go!' "

Le Guin continued to write and publish stories, but her breakthrough success came with the publication of The Left Hand of Darkness in 1969. The novel, which tells of a human ambassador's encounters with the gender-changing inhabitants of a distant planet, was unusual for science fiction in that it owed more to anthropology and sociology than to the hard sciences of physics or biology. The book was lauded for its intellectual and psychological depth, as well as for its fascinating premise. "What got to me was the quality of the story-telling," wrote Frank Herbert, the author of Dune. "She's taken the mythology, psychology -- the entire creative surround -- and woven it into a jewel of a story."

Since then, Le Guin has published many novels, several volumes of short stories, and numerous poems, essays, translations, and children's books. She's won an arm's-length list of awards, including both the Hugo and Nebula Awards for The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed, and a National Book Award for The Farthest Shore. Over the years, she has created and sustained two fictional universes, populating each with dozens of characters and stories. The first universe, Ekumen, more or less fits into the science-fiction mode, with its aliens and interplanetary travel; the second, Earthsea, is a fantasy world, complete with wizards and dragons. As Margaret Atwood wrote in The New York Review of Books, "Either one would have been sufficient to establish Le Guin's reputation as a mistress of its genre; both together make one suspect that the writer has the benefit of arcane drugs or creative double-jointedness or ambidexterity."

More impressive still is the way Le Guin's books have garnered such tremendous crossover appeal. Unlike many writers of science fiction, she is regularly reviewed in mainstream publications, where her work has been praised by the likes of John Updike and Harold Bloom. But then, Le Guin has never fit comfortably into a single genre. As she said in a Science Fiction Weekly interview, "I know that I'm always called 'the sci-fi writer.' Everybody wants to stick me into that one box, while I really live in several boxes. It's probably hurt the sales of my realistic books like Searoad, because it tended to get stuck into science fiction, where browsing readers that didn't read science fiction would never see it."

Le Guin has also published a translation of Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching, a book that has influenced her life and writing since she was a teenager; she has translated fiction by Angelica Gorodischer and a volume of poems by Gabriela Mistral; and, perhaps most gratifyingly for her fans, she has returned to the imaginary realm of Earthsea. Tehanu, which appeared in 1990, was subtitled "The Last Book of Earthsea," but Le Guin found she had more to tell, and she continued with Tales from Earthsea and The Other Wind. "I thought after 'Tehanu' the story was finished, but I was wrong," she told Salon interviewer Faith L. Justice. "I've learned never to say 'never.' "

Good To Know

The "K" in Ursula K. Le Guin stands for Le Guin's maiden name, Kroeber. Her father was the anthropologist Alfred Kroeber; her mother, the writer Theodora Kroeber, is best known for the biography Ishi in Two Worlds.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Portland, Oregon
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 21, 1929
    2. Place of Birth:
      Berkeley, California
    1. Education:
      B.A., Radcliffe College; M.A., Columbia University, 1952
    2. Website:

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Tehanu

    Tehanu returns us to the world of Earthsea, to the time after the The Farthest Shore and The Tombs of Atuan. Tenar has grown older, had a family, and is now a widower when she received an urgentl from Sparrowhawk's former mentor Ogion, the mage that took her in when she first came to the area. As she journeys to her cottage we are introduced to the little girl Therru, marked by horrible tragedy and evil.

    While at Ogion's cottage, Sparrowhawk returns to Tenar, but he returns scarred and damaged, missing part of himself. Tenar, Sparrowhawk, and little Therru make a life journey together to put the pieces of themselves back together and bring the work back to a better place.

    This book was a fantastic read. it gave me what I've always wanted at the end of a series....just one more book. A book to show me how they ended up, what their family was like, and who would continue on after them. Tenar and Ged (also called Sparrowhawk), reunited after many years, are still the same characters I had grown to love in the earlier books. Only this time they are wiser, and will need to use all of their wisdom to help little Therru. Therru drew my sympathy from the start, and I admired her spirit and her tenacity to overcome her difficulties. This was a great addition to the Earthsea Cycle.

    4/5

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2001

    A Great End to a Great Series

    It was a wonderful story all and all. The beginning was a bit slow and the ending was a bit rushed, but the story held together nicely. It really explored some issues that our generation has to deal with. Overall a great book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2000

    A book about being a woman...

    That's right! I don't know if Le Guin really aimed this, but I realized so many things about myself, and about being a woman as I read this wonderful final of the Earthsea series. And in many ways, I am happy to be a Tenar.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2012

    Wonderful!!!!!!!!!!!

    The book was amazing! I just wished it kept going, it left me hanging at the end

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2008

    I Am In Fantasy Heaven

    I am reading the Earthsea series currently and have just finished the fourth book, Tehanu. I have enjoyed each book more than the previous, and so far Tehanu is my favorite. Like the Tombs of Atuan, the book focuses more on Tenar than Ged. It has been many years since Tenar was brought to Gont by Ged. She has been married, had children and has been widowed. She adopts a child found abandoned at a campsite by vagrants and who was left for dead after being pushed into a fire. The book also takes off immediately after The Farthest Shore, and Ged has just returned back to Gont by way of dragon back. His old master has just died and Ged had spent all of his powers getting back from the dead world. He is no longer the Archmage of Roke. Although it seems that Ged had saved the world by closing the rift in our world exposing the dead world, there is still an element of evil on the island of Gont. An old mage, a misogynist by chance, has his eye on destroying Tenar and Ged. But the last person you look at, the burned child girl, Therru, has more to her than meets the eye. I only wished that the pinnacle of the book lasted longer. It was much too short and ended abruptly.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2004

    Bookworm

    Recommended to any true lover of the land of Earthsea. This novel fills in some holes in the mysterious character of Ged; it brings us up to speed on Tenar's life; brings a long lost love story full circle; introduces a new character whose fate holds the life of Ged and Tenar in the balance; and serves as a bridge to other novels (hopefully many more). 'The making from the unmaking, The ending from the beginning, Who shall know surely?' LeGuin does it again.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2004

    Whoopie!!!

    Well, okay. So I haven't read the book since I was in 5th grade, but I remember loving it. I love the theme of feminism present in it, kind of making up for the lack of it in the earlier novels. I also found it funny that the only bad review was from a guy. But anyway, I would highly recommend this novel and any other by Mrs. LeGuin!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2004

    Great Story!

    I love Ursula K. Le Guins writing. This story lies low, but brings a life so easily to the reader. It is a completely diffrent read from other fantasy stories! I loved it because of its unique unfolding and its vibrant characters!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2003

    A delight! Sumptuous! Gorgeous! Rich!

    The Earthsea cycle comes full circle! This is my favorite work in the series!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2002

    Splendid!

    This book was fantastic. Another addition to the Earthsea collection. Le Guin has done it again, and better than ever. Very good, but confusing and unclear at times. I can't wait to get The Other Wind.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2000

    a reviewer

    This book is about the adventures of Tenar and her adopted child Tenahu. This book involves the once and past ArchMage Ged/Sparrowhawk, the new King of Earthsea, and Tenar and how the world isn't quite right even after the King has been crowned. This is somewhat of a sad story but it ends in an unexpected way that involves the very heart and soul of the land of EARTHSEA. I think this is a bit complicated and should be read only by 15 year olds and over.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2014

    Apalling

    Inconsistant in both spirit and substance with the original trilogy this thinly diguised radical feminist screed is a diservice to alllovers of Earthsea

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    A Slower Pace..

    This story is at a much slower pace than the others in the Earthsea cycle. It seems like Le Guin spent the 19 years in between writing these books thinking seriously about Feminist themes and what it means to be a man and a woman and incorporating them into this novel. While that doesn't detract from the book, it definitely puts the cycle on a completely different track and tone...I enjoyed it but if you are looking for more magic and a grand adventure you may not.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    Great book ... classic Le Guin!

    Great book ... classic Le Guin!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2002

    YAWN!

    This book was a HUGE disappointment. All this time I thought Ged was our protagonist. Well, no more. Just in case Tenar/Arha didn't waste enough of our time in book 2, she's back. If Ms. LeGuin wanted to write a book with a female protagonist, I wish she would have given us someone we could actually like. I wish I had never bothered to read this. In my opinion, you don't switch protagonists mid-series, and you don't write a whole book about an annoying charcter. Read the first book (A Wizard of Earthsea) and slog through the second Arha-filled book (Atuan) if you like. If you get that far, go ahead and read the third (the series gets good again), but skip this one altogether.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2002

    BORING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    The fourth book in the series is really dissapointing. It did't feel like a fantasy at all. The last book to a great series was a disaster.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2000

    Pointless and rambling

    Tehanu isn't fantasy, make no mistake about that. No, its not just because its not escapist, or conventional, or inspirational, although these are important fantasy qualities. Its because the book needs no suspension of disbelief. It might as well be set in some remote farming village in medieval Europe; throw in a cameo appearance by a dragon or two, sexual and child abuse, and philosophizing on the greatness of women, and you have Tehanu. Besides which, Tehanu is plotless, and uninteresting. After a few pages, the reader gets tired of the repetive philosophy conitinually gushing out. The reader will also wonder why Mrs. LeGuin turned wise Ged into a whining idiot; just to make the point about men being one-time use things, i suppose? Anyway, this book really isn't worth reading. if you liked the EarthSea *Trilogy* then don't spoil it by reading this one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)