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Telecommunications Cabling Installation

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Overview

THE MOST USEFUL TOOL A CABLING INSTALLER CAN HAVE

There's an acute need for trained and qualified cable installers NOW. That's why industry leaders McGraw-Hill and BICSI have joined forces to provide the most reliable cable installation training manual available. Field-tested by tens of thousands of technicians in 85 countries,BICSI's Telecommunications Cabling Installation is the #1 choice for anyone needing clear cable installation guidelines,parameters,codes,terms,and ...

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Overview

THE MOST USEFUL TOOL A CABLING INSTALLER CAN HAVE

There's an acute need for trained and qualified cable installers NOW. That's why industry leaders McGraw-Hill and BICSI have joined forces to provide the most reliable cable installation training manual available. Field-tested by tens of thousands of technicians in 85 countries,BICSI's Telecommunications Cabling Installation is the #1 choice for anyone needing clear cable installation guidelines,parameters,codes,terms,and acronyms. It is the clearest,most complete guide to the ins and outs of installing cable. It. . .
Breaks each task into bulleted steps Provides to-the-point overviews of each task's place in "the big picture"
Focuses on pathways,spaces,associated hardware,and structured cabling systems to enable channel/link testing within buildings Gives guidelines for installing supporting structures,pulling cable,firestopping,grounding,terminating,splicing,connecting,testing,troubleshooting,retrofitting,safety,and transmission Covers LANs,twisted pair,fiber,Gigabit Ethernet —every system installers need to know Helps reduce errors with handy checklists More!

THE MOST USEFUL TOOL A CABLING INSTALLER CAN HAVE

BICSI'S TELECOMMUNICATIONS CABLING INSTALLATION tested procedures and training for a booming industry Integrating and delivering voice,data,and video is big business. Telecommunications networking and installation is expected to grow well beyond the $4. 2 billion mark. There's an acute need for trained and qualified cable installers NOW.

That's why industry leaders McGraw-Hill and BICSI have joined forces to provide the most reliable cable installation training manual available. Based onBICSI's proven and internationally respected cabling installation guide,this manual provides the depth and breadth of coverage you'd expect when industry leaders join forces. the clearest,most complete guide to the ins and outs of installing cable Renowned for careful research,precise writing,and an easy-to-understand format,BICSI's Telecommunications Cabling Installation is a hands-on guide and overview of the installation procedures that ensure that complex telecom cabling systems work properly and efficiently.

THE BICSI MANUAL'S EASY-TO-USE FORMAT
*Presents a standards-based industry orientation
*Breaks each task into bulleted steps
*Provides to-the-point overviews of each task's place in "the big picture"
*Focuses on pathways,spaces,associated hardware,and structured cabling systems to enable channel/link testing within buildings
*Gives guidelines for installing supporting structures,pulling cable,firestopping,grounding,terminating,splicing,connecting,testing,troubleshooting,retrofitting,safety,and transmission
*Covers LANs,twisted pair,fiber,Gigabit Ethernet —every system installers need to know
*Helps reduce errors with handy checklists
*Is an excellent reference for anyone needing clear cable installation guidelines,parameters,codes,terms,and acronyms
*Has been field-tested by tens of thousands of technicians in 85 countries

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071372053
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
  • Publication date: 2/20/2001
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 607
  • Product dimensions: 7.66 (w) x 9.58 (h) x 1.98 (d)

Meet the Author

BICSI(formerly known as Building Industry Consulting Services International) has trained over 30,000 telecom cable installers and has a membership spanning 85 nations. Their resources include technical publications, training, conferences, and registration programs recognized worldwide as the standard for installation/maintenance education and certification in the telecom industry.
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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 3: Installing Supporting Structures

Setting Up Telecommunications Closets

Overview

There are two types of telecommunications spaces in which the termination of cabling permits cross-connection and interconnection.

  • Equipment rooms
  • Telecommunications closets

These two spaces share some of the same basic purposes. They both support the installation of cables, connecting hardware, cross-connects, and electronic equipment. For instance, while a telecommunications closet is generally floor serving, an equipment room is generally building serving. The primary difference is in the nature of what they serve.

Equipment rooms are designed to house large equipment items such as telephone cabinets, data processing mainframe computers, Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS), or video head-end equipment. The floor loading of equipment rooms must be rated higher than that for telecommunications closets because of the anticipated high concentration of equipment in a confined space. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) requirements for these spaces are also greater.

Telecommunications closets are designed for only limited equipment and floor loading. They may house splice cases, termination hardware, and relay racks. Small items of equipment such as hubs, multiplexers, and key telephone systems can also be found in telecommunications closets.

Every building is served by at least one telecommunications closet or equipment room, and each building should be provisioned with a minimum of one telecommunications closet on each floor.

The types of cabling facilities which may be serviced by telecommunications closets are:

  • Horizontal cables and their connecting hardware
  • Backbone cables and their connecting hardware
  • Building entrance cables and their connecting hardware
  • Telecommunications equipment
  • Data processing equipment
  • Public network equipment
  • Video head-end equipment
  • Paging systems
  • Intelligent building systems

In smaller buildings, these may be housed in a single equipment room. Cross-connects between horizontal and backbone systems will be found in telecommunications closets. Work area outlets must be cabled to the connecting hardware in telecommunications closets, thereby providing connection between them and the backbone system. Horizontal cabling should be terminated in a telecommunications closet on the same floor as the area being served. Cabling between telecommunications closets is considered to be a backbone cable.

Additional space may be available in a building that is currently being employed as a makeshift telecommunications closet. The proper equipment must be installed and provisions made for the cable and connecting hardware to upgrade the space to a true telecommunications closet. If the existing closet is a closet shared with electrical, plumbing, or HVAC facilities, then this choice for a telecommunications closet must be reconsidered. Never house telecommunications facilities in a space which handles other building utilities.

It is recommended that telecommunications closets have 0.75-in-thick plywood backboards installed on at least two walls of the closet. The backboard should be painted with two coats of nonconductive, fireretardant paint of alight color. The plywood provides a space for wallmounting connecting hardware. A 300 mm (12 in) wide cable tray or ladder rack should be mounted on the same walls) as the backboard. Good planning dictates that all walls of a telecommunications closet be equipped with plywood and cable tray/ladder rack to facilitate future growth.

The telecommunications designer's documents will indicate the size, location, quantity, and nomenclature of the equipment to be installed in the closet, along with a routing diagram of the cables to be installed or those that pass through the closet. They will also show the location of the pathways entering or leaving the space and who is responsible for installing them. If equipment racks are to be installed, a plan view of the space will indicate where their respective footprints are located and how they relate to other equipment being installed. In most instances, the telecommunications designer's documents will indicate where voice, data, and video cables are to be terminated. The telecommunications designer may be an architect, consulting engineer, or a Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD®).

Always ensure that appropriate clearances are maintained around all pieces of equipment. In the absence of a specified distance, plan for a minimum of 1 m (3.3 ft) work and aisle space. If a telecommunications closet layout is not provided, prepare one. Details for laying out a telecommunications closet may be found in the most current edition of the BICSI Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual.

Plywood backboards

Plywood backboards are employed on walls in telecommunications closets. Plywood is available in two types-interior and exterior-and in four grades-A, B, C, and D.

Sheets of plywood are normally sized 4-ft wide by 8-ft high. The thickness is variable, but, for the purposes of this document only two will be considered: 0.75 in and 1 in. Plywood that is too thin allows the screws used by cabling installers to penetrate completely through the plywood and sometimes does not offer enough strength to ensure that mounted hardware is securely anchored. Plywood sheets thicker than one inch are not usually required. This, of course, is contingent on the sheet of plywood being properly attached to the building structure.

The finishing grade of plywood (A, B, C, or D) describes the quality of the surface, i.e., degree of knotholes or blemishes. Grade A is the highest grade and is without any surface blemishes. Grade B has the knotholes cut out and replaced with a patch of clean wood. Grade C contains some blemishes and an occasional small knothole. Grade D contains knotholes without any repair or corrective action by the manufacturer. Grading of a sheet of plywood may result in a different grade for each of the two sides. For instance, a sheet of plywood could be graded ABone side is A and the reverse side is B.

Plywood should also be void free. This means that the space in each layer inside the plywood where the knotholes are removed is completely filled with replacement wood patches. Voids inside the sheet of ) plywood may create a weak spot to which the attachment hardware (i.e., screws, toggle bolts, etc.) cannot hold fast.

For telecommunications use, grade A/C should be used. The A side is exposed to the interior of the closet and the C side placed against the building structure or cabinet wall.

If the plywood is to be painted, do not use treated (fire-retardant) plywood. This type of plywood is usually pressure treated with a saline solution. The effects of the treatment will cause the paint to crack, deteriorate, and peal off the plywood backboard. In addition, the saline solution can cause the metal hardware mounted to the plywood to corrode. Untreated plywood, when painted, should be painted with two coats of fire-retardant paint in the color specified by the designer, as stated earlier...

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Background Information.
Chapter 2: Industry Orientation.
Chapter 3: Structured Cabling Systems.
Chapter 4: Standards and Codes.
Chapter 5: Codes Affecting Telecommunications.
Chapter 6: Plans and Specifications.
Chapter 7: Media.
Chapter 8: Connectorization.
Chapter 9: Transmission.
Chapter 10: Copper Cable Media.
Chapter 11: Optical Fiber Cable Media.
Chapter 12: Grounding and Bonding.
Chapter 13: Protection Systems.
Chapter 14: Telecommunications Grounding Practices.
Chapter 15: System Practices.
Chapter 16: Equipment Grounding.
Chapter 17: Telecommunications Circuit Protectors.
Chapter 18: Protector Technology.
Chapter 19: Primary Protector Installation Practices.
Chapter 20: Common Safety Practices.
Chapter 21: Personal Protective Equipment.
Chapter 22: Hazardous Environments - Indoor.
Chapter 23: Hazardous Environments - Outdoors.
Chapter 24: Professionalism.
Chapter 25: Planning.
Chapter 26: Storage of Project Materials.
(and more...)
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2002

    Great Resource

    I have 37 years in telecommunications. This book is an exceptional guide for technicians working at the customer premise. Every essential topic is covered and provides specific and detailed information.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2001

    Highly Recommended

    This manual is pertinent to the library of any Telecommunications Personnel. It's quite thorough and equipped with the most recent information from the telecommunications industry.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2001

    Excellent Instructional Resource

    As a technical instructor and cabling novice I found this installation book to be easy to read, well crafted, and an excellent resource.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2001

    A Low Voltage Installer Bible

    Every technician involved in infrastructure cabling should carry this detailed volume in his toolbox. Definitely the bible for low voltage cabling.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2001

    Experience Speaks

    Having been in the industry for over 40 years, I have had a first hand view of technical documents related to telecommunications infrastructure design and installation. Without a doubt, this is the most comprehensive technical document available in the industry, worldwide, related to the installation of telecommunications infrastructure in commercial buildings. It is fast becoming the standard for the industry as the 'premier' guide for installation and maintenance of pathways, spaces, wire/cable, termination hardware and testing of ANSI/TIA/EIA Standards compliant systems. Go BICSI!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2001

    Awesome Book

    This book is a 'must have' for persons that are involved in the installation of Telecommunications cabling in comercial buildings. This book is probably the most complete assembling of pertinant information of its kind. I highly recommend this valuable resource.

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