Telegraph Avenue (Enhanced Edition)

Telegraph Avenue (Enhanced Edition)

3.4 43
by Michael Chabon
     
 

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The immensely gifted writer and magical prose stylist Michael Chabon delivers another bravura epic-a big-hearted, exhilarating novel exploring the profoundly intertwined lives of two Oakland families.



This enhanced edition includes an original theme song, 10 stunning designs from the artist Stainboy, and a custom-made map of Telegraph Avenue, all

Overview

The immensely gifted writer and magical prose stylist Michael Chabon delivers another bravura epic-a big-hearted, exhilarating novel exploring the profoundly intertwined lives of two Oakland families.



This enhanced edition includes an original theme song, 10 stunning designs from the artist Stainboy, and a custom-made map of Telegraph Avenue, all commissioned by the author for the digital book. Also includes audio excerpts read by actor Clarke Peters (The Wire, Treme) and a video interview with the author.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062225504
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/11/2012
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
496
Sales rank:
175,712
File size:
224 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Michael Chabon is the bestselling and Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the novels The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, The Final Solution, The Yiddish Policemen’s Union, Gentlemen of the Road, and Telegraph Avenue; the short story collections A Model World and Werewolves in Their Youth; and the essay collections Maps and Legends and Manhood for Amateurs. He lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife, the novelist Ayelet Waldman, and their children.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Berkeley, California
Date of Birth:
May 24, 1963
Place of Birth:
Washington, D.C.
Education:
B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.F.A., University of California at Irvine
Website:
http://www.michaelchabon.com/

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Telegraph Avenue 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 42 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love how Chabon has this ability to suck you into a story, to really know his characters and build from there. Pick this up and you wont regret it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is simply pitch perfect. Only my second Chabon, and I intend to read them all. Never in the world thought I would care about most of these characters, but I do. I really do. This is a writer who could most likely make me like just about anyone he cares about.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you have spent any time around Telegraph Avenue, on the Berkeley-Oakland border, this book will have great meaning and resonate for you. The characters are just that and it flows nicely with these characters in an ensemble fashion, weaving in the subplots of jazz on vinyl, political corruption and familial love. There are several stories being told, all of which grab the reader and hold until resolution... including Fifty-Eight the parrot's escape, written in a James Joyce style. A great read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was going to suggest that the only improvement on this book would be to include a sound track. Maybe the "enhanced" edition does just that; shame on Barnes & Noble for not saying in its Overview. I thought the book was profound as could be and VERY funny. And I'm still wondering what happened to Fifty-Eight. -- catwak
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
Tele­graph Avenue by Michael Chabon is a lit­er­ary fic­tion book in which the author jams so much in it’s a won­der the novel is not twice the size. Mr. Chabon is a Pulitzer prize win­ning author for his 2001 book The Amaz­ing Adven­tures of Kava­lier & Clay. Nat Jaffe and Archy Stallings are the own­ers of Broke­land Records, one of the few bas­tions of vinyl record stores left in Oak­land, CA circa 2004. In comes Gib­son Goode, ex-NFL star, multi-millionaire and entre­pre­neur who wants to open his Dog­pile mega­s­tore in the area. The mega­s­tore will force Broke­land Records, who are strug­gling as it is, to close. Nat’s wife, Aviva, and Archy’s wife, Gwen, are hav­ing their own strug­gles – they are mid­wives who have deliv­ered thou­sands of babies until one deliv­ery goes wrong and quickly turns ugly. Tele­graph Avenue by Michael Chabon is a strange book, if Quentin Taran­tino wrote a book I’d imag­ined it would be some­thing like this – bet­ter yet, if you had to read a Quentin Taran­tino movie, it would be exactly like this. A schiz­o­phrenic expe­ri­ence which will leave you dazed and some­what con­fused until things will clear up a few pages down – only for the cycle to be repeated again and again. The strange­ness doesn’t come from the story, which is quite sim­ple, but from the art­ful sto­ry­telling. There are many pop-culture ref­er­ences (includ­ing many to Taran­tino him­self), music, books, movies, TV shows and some made up ref­er­ences which only exist within the realm of the book. While I do enjoy pop-culture ref­er­ences in my read­ing, the sheer amount made the book dif­fi­cult to read, albeit enjoy­able in its own unique way. I’m usu­ally pretty good about esti­mat­ing how long a book would take me to read, this one took twice as long and could have eas­ily been more than that. So keep your favorite Inter­net search engine close by – you’ll need it. That being said, the book is rid­dled pop-culture and music. Many fine authors can write about pop-culture, but Chabon is the only one who can write music. Not writ­ing “about” music, but writ­ing music. When Chabon writes about a music pas­sage, I could almost hear it in my head even though I had no idea what he was refer­ring to, whether it was or wasn’t what I heard doesn’t mat­ter – I heard it. This book is a col­lege professor’s dream. You can cre­ate a whole course around it with ease. The book some­times goes into so many details it’s frus­trat­ing, but the obser­va­tions about our cul­ture and Amer­i­can lifestyles are encour­ag­ing and inter­est­ing. Of course, it could all be a smoke screen as Chabon says himself: "some Jew­ish dude try­ing to think like an ass-kicking soul sister". I felt the book was too long (some of the descrip­tions seem to go on for­ever), yet despite a need for an edi­tor, Chabon has man­aged to pro­duce another good book with excel­lent prose. I thought that the 12 page sen­tence was a lit­er­ary mar­vel which only few
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It took me a while to warm up to these characters, so the virtuosity of Chabon's prose felt a bit like a dry exercise. I did eventually come to sympathize with them and ended up reading most of the book in one long binge. The accumulating layers of problems and looming disasters faced by Archie, Nat and their various family members kept me turning pages, though i felt Chabon wrapped up all the loose ends too neatly to give readers a happy ending for everyone. Then i looked back and reconsidered the story as a kind of fable rather than an attempt at realism and that helped me appreciate rhe novel more. There are some interesting themes that I enjoyed mulling over as I read, and some funny lines, and of course, beautiful, brainy prose.
BookHopper More than 1 year ago
If you've lived in the East Bay of San Francisco for 55 years you'll identify with Michael Chabon's book. There's so much nostalgia both in places and people that anyone growing up in the area will say, "been there, done that." The downside of the book is long strings of adjectives describing a person or place that you've lost track of by the time you get to a full stop. This said, Chabon is a master of fun insights and expressions, my favorite in Telegraph Avenue is Aviva saying her husband is "unable to organize an empty drawer". Michael Chabon captures the length of Telegraph Avenue stretching from Oakland to berkeley, from the vinyl '60s to the near present, and from black to liberal white lifestyles with a heavy smattering of kosher mixed with jazz. Persevere and be rewarded wonderfully. Way to go Michael.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
... and I am a big fan of Cavalier & Clay and Yiddish Policemens Union. He captures the funky characters and setting of Brokeland perfectly.
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momgoose More than 1 year ago
this is a gift for my sister - she will be thrilled with it.
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Great book,and really good story.love it and once I get done reading it,I have to read it aging over and over aging. Pleas book worms this book. You will enjoy it!
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