The Telephone Gambit: Chasing Alexander Graham Bell's Secret

The Telephone Gambit: Chasing Alexander Graham Bell's Secret

3.0 4
by Seth Shulman
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0393062066

ISBN-13: 9780393062069

Pub. Date: 01/07/2008

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

A gripping intrigue at the heart of one of the world’s most important inventions.

Overview

A gripping intrigue at the heart of one of the world’s most important inventions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393062069
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/07/2008
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.00(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Telephone Gambit: Chasing Alexander Graham Bell's Secret 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is hard to put down. It is very well researched and written! The author has done fantastic detective work and makes his case that Bell saw Elisha Gray's patent first and then altered his, using influence to get his patent entered first. The author started reluctantly down this path and had to prove it to himself as well as scientists and historians he knew at MIT's Dibner Institute before he wrote the book. In my opinion, simply ignore any negative review(s). This is a must-read. In fact, there are modern examples of similar tactics with patents but it is still shocking to see an iconic figure such as Bell perpetrating and benefitting from such deceit. You'll love this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
A truly captivating factual write-up. I'm submitting it to my bookclub as my selection.
Guest More than 1 year ago
No mention of Antonio Meucci, who was using his working telephone when Bell was still 4 years old? Meucci and Bell's stories are where the real smoking gun lies. Focusing on E.G. is an old story and misses the boat. Embarrassing that Meucci is not mentioned here, at least not in the official synopsis. Hopefully it's in the book beyond just a passing reference.