Television Courtroom Broadcasting Effects: The Empirical Research and the Supreme Court Challenge

Overview

Court and policy makers have increasingly had to deal with—and sometimes even embrace—technology, from podcasts to the Internet. Televised courtroom broadcasting especially remains an issue. The debate surrounding the US Supreme Court and federal courts, as well as the great disparity between different forms of television courtroom broadcasting, rages on. What are the effects of television courtroom broadcasting? Does research support the arguments for or against? Despite three Supreme Court cases on television ...
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Television Courtroom Broadcasting Effects: The Empirical Research and the Supreme Court Challenge

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Overview

Court and policy makers have increasingly had to deal with—and sometimes even embrace—technology, from podcasts to the Internet. Televised courtroom broadcasting especially remains an issue. The debate surrounding the US Supreme Court and federal courts, as well as the great disparity between different forms of television courtroom broadcasting, rages on. What are the effects of television courtroom broadcasting? Does research support the arguments for or against? Despite three Supreme Court cases on television courtroom broadcasting, the common thread between the cases has not been highlighted. The Supreme Court in these cases maintains a common theme: there is not a sufficient body of research on the effects of televising courtroom proceedings to resolve the debate in a confident manner.
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Editorial Reviews

Malcolm M. Feeley
It recounts the arguments for and against. . . and reveals most of them to be self-serving assertions with next to no evidence to support them. . . it takes the claims and counterclaims seriously, and sets out a sensible approach to replace hot air with hard evidence. This topic is timely. Courts are under pressure to revise their rules. It will become the indispensible read for everyone interested in the topic.
Eric P. Robinson
Questions many of the assumptions. . . as well as raising several other issues that have not been extensively addressed. . . a new, interesting and useful perspective to the discussion and debate.
Duncan Bloy
[This book] is the most comprehensive research-based assessment of the pros and cons of television broadcasting available on the market today. . . All those of us with an interest in open justice will welcome this book as making a major contribution to the debate, being perhaps the only book on the market that provides a totally objective assessment of the evidence to date.
Glen Creeber
An essential read for anyone interested in justice and the media in the twenty-first century.
The Barrister
This book is a corrective. First, it recounts the arguments for and against television in courtrooms, and reveals most of them to be self-serving assertions with next to no evidence to support them. Second, it takes the claims and counterclaims seriously, and sets out a sensible approach to replace hot air with hard evidence. This topic is timely. Courts are under pressure to revise their rules. It will become the indispensable read for everyone interested in the topic.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761860051
  • Publisher: University Press of America
  • Publication date: 4/16/2013
  • Pages: 494
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Lambert is a lawyer and academic specializing in media, intellectual property, and information technology law.
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Table of Contents

1 Introduction
2 The Supreme Court and the Research Challenge
3 Camera Developments in US
4 Cameras: The UK Perspective
5 What Exactly is Courtroom Broadcasting?
6 What is Television Courtroom Broadcasting (TCB)?
7 Are There TCB Genres and Formats?
8 General (Non Social Science) Research Literature
9 General (Non Social Science) Research Themes
10 Empirical Research and Themes
11 The Psychology Challenge
12 The Distraction Challenge
13 The Location Challenge
14 Education Effects Research
15 Education Effects Challenge
16 TCB Effects: Meeting the Research Challenges
17 The First TCB Eye Tracking Demonstration
18 Conclusion
Appendix 1: Select General Literature on Courtroom Broadcasting
Appendix 2: Summary and Categorisation of Supreme Court Effects Issues and Concerns
Appendix 3: General (Non Social Science) Research Literature
Bibliography
Index
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