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Tell a Thousand Lies

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Overview

In a land where skin colour can determine one's destiny, fraternal twins PULLAMMA and LATA are about to embark on a journey that will tear their lives apart.

Dark skinned Pullamma dreams of being a wife. With three girls in her family, the sixteen year old is aware there isn't enough dowry to secure suitable husbands for them all. But a girl can hope. She's well versed in cooking, pickle making, cow washing -- you name it. She's also obliged ...

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Overview

In a land where skin colour can determine one's destiny, fraternal twins PULLAMMA and LATA are about to embark on a journey that will tear their lives apart.

Dark skinned Pullamma dreams of being a wife. With three girls in her family, the sixteen year old is aware there isn't enough dowry to secure suitable husbands for them all. But a girl can hope. She's well versed in cooking, pickle making, cow washing -- you name it. She's also obliged her old-fashioned grandmother by not doing well in school.

Fair skinned and pretty, her twin sister Lata would rather study medicine than get married. Unable to grasp the depth of Lata's desire, the twins' Grandmother formalizes a wedding alliance for the girl. Distraught, Lata rebels, with devastating consequences.

As Pullamma helps ready the house for her older sister Malli's bride viewing, she prays for a positive outcome to the event. What happens next is so inconceivable that it will shape Pullamma's future in ways she couldn't have foreseen.

TELL A THOUSAND LIES is a sometimes wry, sometimes sad, but ultimately realistic look at how superstition and the colour of a girl's skin rules India's hinterlands.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466340374
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/8/2012
  • Pages: 338
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Rasana is the author of Amazon bestseller 'Tell A Thousand Lies', which was also shortlisted for the '2012 Tibor Jones South Asia award'. UK's Glam magazine calls this novel one of their 'five favourite tales from India' (June 2014). Her other works are 'The Temple Is Not My Father' and '28 Years A Bachelor' (coming October 31, 2014).
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 5, 2012

    "Tell A Thousand Lies" is a compelling and well-writte

    "Tell A Thousand Lies" is a compelling and well-written story about two sisters in India whose lives are turned upside down when a conniving politician preys on the superstitions of local villagers. Pullama dreams of a good marriage, but she's dark-skinned and therefore considered a less attractive bridal candidate. Her twin sister Lata is drop-dead gorgeous, but Lata dreams of continuing her education and becoming a doctor. When the two sisters find their roles reversed, Lata's simmering resentment threatens all that Pullama has ever held dear.

    I'd highly recommend "Tell a Thousand Lies." I'm extremely picky about self-published books because many of them are poorly edited and could have used some more work. This book isn't one of them. The writing is beautiful and the story sucked me in. I stayed up until 2 am to finish it because I couldn't put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 13, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Very Superstitious┬┐Superstition Ain┬┐t the Way

    Welcome to Pullamma’s India where gods are in abundance and the girl next door can become a goddess even if the color of her skin prohibits her from being treated as a normal human being.

    Rosana Atreya invites us into a female’s world by way of India. The story is told through the eyes of a dark-skinned twin whose future looked bleak because of a pigment caste of sorts. She and her grandmother were bullied into a peculiar situation by an evil politician who manipulated them on the basis of their submissive positions and, quite frankly, their lack of intelligence. Pullamma’s future seemed to be determined until Sriker stepped onto the scene. Sriker had a master plan, and it helped that he was the grandson of the bad guy. This seemed to work for a while until…you guessed it - Grandpa outsmarts all of them.

    “Tell a Thousand Lies” started off sluggish, but being a lover of history and culture, I was intrigued. I was mid-way through the book and I could not get the thought out of my mind that I was reading a novel suited for a middle school student. The story was definitely solid, and the plot was well executed. But at some point Pullamma grew up and I did feel that while the story matured a bit, it didn’t by much.

    The use of language was something that I pondered. There was a lot of cultural words and phrases used and it wasn’t overkill; however when the author would combine that with contemporary lingo, it made me question if it fit the characters and their culture as well as the time period.

    The characters were charming and funny and I think this may have taken away from the seriousness of what the author wanted to convey. While I liked the characters, I wish some of them would’ve had more depth since the novel was a pretty good length. Pullamma, who was the main character, was the best developed of the entire cast.

    I always look for impact when I read. “Tell a Thousand Lies” did seem to touch several emotions, but I wish it would’ve been a bit more serious. It was a good story but I wasn’t greatly impacted. I really struggled with the rating. It deserves a 3.5.

    Reviewed by: Trenika
    3.5

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  • Posted July 24, 2012

    Worth the read

    With elegant prose and cultural sensitivity, Rasana Atreya brings her characters and setting to life in Tell A Thousand Lies. Atreya's use of vocabulary, dialogue and description are excellent throughout the novel and help the themes of discrimination, family and hope resonate with readers. The cultural terms and customs are handled with delicacy, as Atreya writes with a well-crafted combination of explanation (to clue in the reader) and restraint (to avoid insulting the readers' intelligence).

    At times, the narrative is play-by-play, and tells the reader a character's emotions rather than showing. The book is also a choppy read, as the chapters--which are short themselves--are broken into small segments that are often only a couple paragraphs in length. My least favorite aspect of the book was the simplistic chapter titles, which explained too much and detracted from the mature atmosphere that the book's darker themes required.

    Overall, I recommend this book, especially for readers interested in cultures around the world.

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  • Posted June 10, 2012

    I was a little hesitant with starting to read this book...I was

    I was a little hesitant with starting to read this book...I was a little unsure how I'd like it. It was a little outside of my comfort zone with the books I like to read. Once I got started, it was on!

    Let me say that while reading this book, I could really picture myself in rural India. THe author did a great job of using imagery without being blantanly descriptive. I could actually picture the house with the courtyard, the heat of the day (I imagine how hot it gets in Texas and then multipled that by 100), and what the characters looked like.

    I felt the story was a little drawn out. I'm not sure if this was b/c of my irritation with the story line or just that I felt like I was reading it forever. It really irritated me that Pullamma got so close to her happiness - even being there at one point - and then having it taken away from her just like that. Throughout this story I REALLY wanted her to be happy and when she was I felt happy right there with her. Then out of nowhere BAM! I felt hurt and sad right with her.

    So, I did love that the author could make me feel with the character. My emotions went up and down just as the characters did. Not many books can do this for me.

    I also learned quite a bit about the indian culture and a lot of the way women were treated and some still are today makes me angry. I also really loved when Pullamma started coming out of her shell, I love that she finally started standing up for herself.

    I am very happy with the way the book ended, I just wish it had gotten there sooner.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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