Tell Me What It's Like to Be Big by Joyce Dunbar, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Tell Me What It's Like to Be Big

Tell Me What It's Like to Be Big

by Joyce Dunbar, Debi Gliori
     
 

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Early one morning, Willa gets up and tries to make her own breakfast. But she's too small to reach anything. Luckily, her older brother, Willoughby, is there to help--and to tell her about the many things she'll be able to do all by herself once she's big.

A cozy companion to the bestselling Tell Me Something Happy Before I Go to Sleep, this gentle and

Overview


Early one morning, Willa gets up and tries to make her own breakfast. But she's too small to reach anything. Luckily, her older brother, Willoughby, is there to help--and to tell her about the many things she'll be able to do all by herself once she's big.

A cozy companion to the bestselling Tell Me Something Happy Before I Go to Sleep, this gentle and reassuring story about growing up is just right for every child--big or small.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The picture book equivalent of comfort food. It's one of those stories you'll gladly read over and over again."--The San Diego Union-Tribune

"Utterly charming . . . Another winner from the team that brought us Tell Me Something Happy Before I Go to Sleep."--Booklist

"A moving tribute to the sibling ties that bind."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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The Barnes & Noble Review
Author Joyce Dunbar and illustrator Debi Gliori offer a charming sequel to the much-loved Tell Me Something Happy Before I Go to Sleep, as the adorable rabbit siblings, Willa and her big brother, Willoughby, explore the experience of growing up.

When Willa wakes up early, she tries to make breakfast herself. Too small to reach the table or any food, she wakes up big brother, who sleepily agrees to help. He informs his little sister that one day she'll be big enough to reach the table, turn on the lamp, and brush her teeth all by herself. But when Willoughby suggests that she'll eventually grow tired of toys and enter the world on her own, Willa is not happy. The siblings then decide to wake up Mama and find out what she did when she was small. And Mom cleverly replies, "Well, if I woke up too early in the morning, I went back to sleep." The three of them snuggle up, content, happy, and just the right size to fit nicely into bed.

Gliori is known for her endearing portraits and gentle illustrations. She does not disappoint, with the two bunnies clad in the sweetest bunny gear. Willa sports a white-and-blue sailor suit and chicken slippers, while Willoughby dons an adorable pair of pajamas covered with snow peas and tomatoes. The house is filled with soothing prints and colors -- flowers, stripes, and a very obvious garden theme fill every room. Gliori perfectly captures youthful behavior -- from Willoughby's quasi-careful attempt to wash dishes to Willa's adorable shot at brushing her own teeth. The final scene will reassure young readers everywhere that you are never too big to snuggle with your mom.

Dunbar writes with ease and simplicity as she explores the scary thought of being (ugh!) a grown-up. Realistic and loving dialogue flow between brother and sister. Her expert writing skills help readers identify with the siblings, making this another tender tale for little ones. (Amy Barkat)

Children's Literature
Little Willa is the first to wake up one morning. The little bunny puts on her chicken slippers and goes downstairs to have breakfast. Poor Willa can't reach anything on the breakfast table until she enlists the help of her big brother, Willoughby. Kind, patient Willoughby assures his little sister that someday she will be big, too, and tells Willa all of the good things she will be able to do by herself. When Willa worries about other things that go along with growing up—not playing with toys, going out alone into the big world—Willoughby again reassures her. Brother and sister end their early morning adventure snuggled into Mom's bed. The story is charming and comforting, and the illustrations radiate warmth. The text is somewhat marred by a disconnection between the words and pictures on one page, in which Willoughby talks about wearing hippo slippers, but is clearly wearing chicken ones. 2001, Harcourt, Turner
School Library Journal
PreS-K-Young children will recognize their own frustrations in this gentle and colorful exploration of being too small. Willa tries to reach her breakfast on the table all by herself but can't manage it. She is forced to wake her brother for help. She asks him, wistfully, what it's like to be big, and Willoughby fills her in on all the wonderful aspects of growing up. The little bunny decides she doesn't ever want to be too big for toys but that she might not mind going out into the big, wide world if her favorite teddy bear accompanies her. The illustrations that fill each and every page to the edges have enough detail to keep young audiences occupied. Patterns on everyday objects such as the tablecloth, rugs, and the rabbits' clothing lend an air of coziness to the story. Dunbar has captured exactly how children think in this loving dialogue between two siblings. A comfortable and inviting book, just right for exploring the idea of growing up.-Alison Kastner, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152052478
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/01/2005
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 11.06(h) x (d)
Age Range:
1 - 3 Years

Meet the Author


JOYCE DUNBAR has written more than fifty books for children, including The Very Small and This Is the Star. She lives in Norwich, England.

DEBI GLIORI is the illustrator of many beloved picture books, including Joyce Dunbar's The Very Small. She lives near Edinburgh, Scotland.

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