Tell No One Who You Are: The Hidden Childhood of Regine Miller

Tell No One Who You Are: The Hidden Childhood of Regine Miller

5.0 3
by Walter Buchignani
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

During the days of Nazi terror in Europe, many Jewish children were taken from their families and hidden. Régine Miller was one such child, who left her mother, father, and brother when she was 10 years old. Utterly alone as she is shunted from place to place, told to tell no one she is Jewish, she hears that her mother and brother have been taken by the SS, the…  See more details below

Overview

During the days of Nazi terror in Europe, many Jewish children were taken from their families and hidden. Régine Miller was one such child, who left her mother, father, and brother when she was 10 years old. Utterly alone as she is shunted from place to place, told to tell no one she is Jewish, she hears that her mother and brother have been taken by the SS, the German secret police. Only her desperate hope that her father will return sustains her. At war’s end she must learn to live with the terrible truth of “the final solution,” the Nazi’s extermination camps.

The people who sheltered Régine cover a wide spectrum of human types, ranging from callous to kind, fearful to defiant, exploitive to caring. This is a story of a brave girl and an equally brave woman to tell the story so many years later.


From the Hardcover edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Ten years old when her brother was arrested by Nazis, Miller, a Jewish girl, survived the occupation of Belgium by living under a false identity. In a starred review, PW said that Buchignani recreates Miller's experiences with "aching clarity," conveying "both a human drama and a chilling moment in history." Ages 12-up. (May) r
Children's Literature - Ali Fell
Regine Miller's biographical story is one account of an experience shared by 4,000 Jewish children during World War II in Belgium. After the Nazi invasion, a network of courageous social workers secretly placed Jewish children with non-Jewish Belgium families, followed up on the care of each child, and kept meticulous documentation so that the children could be reunited with their families after the War. As Regine's story begins, she is a young girl living in Brussels. Like many Jews, her father is sure that the Nazis will be stopped before they invade Belgium; he was wrong. Regine's brother is deported by the Nazi invaders as slave labor. Her family makes the decision to protect Regine by requesting that she be sent into foster care. Almost immediately, Regine loses her public identity and contact with her own family members. Her story does not end when the Allies free Belgium. The author explores what it might be like to hide ones' identity, to live in constant fear of exposure, and to use only imagination as a link to all that is loved and familiar. The book is not only of historical interest; there are parallels that can be found in the lives of readers who have their own secrets or who have lived with families which are not their own. It is a good book for adults to choose for use in discussions about the Holocaust, about Righteous Gentiles, and about the many dilemmas and emotions evoked when humans live under extreme stress. A concise list of dates for significant events in Europe during World War II is printed at the end of the story. Reviewer: Ali Fell
Merri Monks
Regine Miller was born in Brussels to parents who had escaped the anti-Semitism of Eastern Europe. She was 10 years old in 1942 when she watched in horror with her mother and father as the Nazis took away her brother with hundreds of other Jewish boys. Determined to save his only remaining child, Regine's father, a member of the Belgian resistance group Solidarite, sent her into hiding. Sustained during the Nazi occupation by her belief that her family would be reunited, Regine lived with four separate families, only the last of which was kind to her. Her brother and her parents perished in the death camps; Fela Mucha, the Solidarite member who maintained contact with Regine, helped her find surviving relatives at the war's end. Miller and Buchignani met in 1991 at a gathering of Jewish men and women who, as children, had been hidden from the Nazis. The young reporter helped Miller recall the painful details of her experiences. This biography is not only a view of Nazi persecution from a young girl's perspective, but also a sensitive portrayal of her growth, development, and emotional life under the worst of circumstances. It is also the remarkable story of Mucha, who managed to save more than 500 Jewish children.
From the Publisher
“Buchignani…[recreates] Régine’s experiences with aching clarity…he conveys both a human drama and a chilling moment in history.”
Publishers Weekly

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770490062
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
02/14/2012
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
929,457
File size:
4 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Tundra’s WALTER BUCHIGNANI was born in Montreal, Quebec. He graduated from Concordia with a B.A. in Journalism and Political Science. He has worked at the Montreal Gazette since 1987, first as a reporter, then feature writer, and now as a copy editor. Buchignani now writes regularly about Formula One auto racing, one of his favorite pastimes.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Tell No One Who You Are: The Hidden Childhood of Regine Miller 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a tragic story of a Jewish girl living during WWII. IT makes you realize how fortunate you are and to never give up hope. I am a HUGE WWII book fan and this is one of the best I've read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tell No One Who You Are was a sad true story of a young girl living through the Holocaust as a Jew. When her mother and brother were killed right in front of her and her father, she got sent to a house far away to keep her from getting killed by the Germans. This happens after being beaten, used as a slave, and as a families one and only daughter. This book was breath taking and unbeleivably told by a person who lived through the Holocaust. I did not dislike verry much of this book. The book was verry well told. My favorite part was the ending. I cant tell you this part so it does not give it away. My other favorite part was when it graphic descriptions of when her brother and mother were killed right in front of her. I hope you enjoy as much as I did.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago