Tempest in the Tea Room: An Ezra Melamed Mystery

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Overview

Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes when a crime wave sweeps through 19th-century London's Jewish community and the adventures of wealthy-widower-turned-sleuth Ezra Melamed are recorded for posterity by Miss Rebecca Lyon, a young lady not quite at the marriageable age.

In this third volume of the series, tragedy strikes when the Jewish orphanage's children are stricken with a mysterious and nearly fatal stomach ailment. When the ailment travels to the Mayfair home of Lady ...

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Overview

Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes when a crime wave sweeps through 19th-century London's Jewish community and the adventures of wealthy-widower-turned-sleuth Ezra Melamed are recorded for posterity by Miss Rebecca Lyon, a young lady not quite at the marriageable age.

In this third volume of the series, tragedy strikes when the Jewish orphanage's children are stricken with a mysterious and nearly fatal stomach ailment. When the ailment travels to the Mayfair home of Lady Marblehead, a young Jewish physician is accused of poisoning his patients - a suspicion that is further fueled when a priceless pearl bracelet is discovered missing from Lady Marblehead's jewellery box.

As more outbreaks occur, an increasingly hysterical community turns to Mr Ezra Melamed to investigate the case. But once again there are too few clues and too little time, especially since the littlest victim, a frail orphan boy, is already almost at death's door.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780983793168
  • Publisher: Aster Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2012
  • Pages: 206
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Meet the Author

Libi Astaire is an award-winning author who often writes about Jewish history. The first book in her acclaimed Ezra Melamed Mystery series, The Disappearing Dowry, received a 2010 Sydney Taylor Notable Book Award and has been translated into Russian. She is also the author of Terra Incognita, a novel about modern-day descendants of Spain's crypto-Jews, and several volumes of Chassidic tales. She lives in Jerusalem, Israel.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 2, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Ezra Melamed is a Jewish detective in London of the 1800s. In Li

    Ezra Melamed is a Jewish detective in London of the 1800s. In Libi Astaire’s Tempest in the Tea Room, Melamed must discover why otherwise healthy orphans are becoming deathly ill. In this tale, set against the backdrop of London’s Jewish community, complete with jealousy, revenge, unrequited love, and snobbish pretensions, we meet a character who is understated, and at the same time, larger than life.
    Astaire does a deft job of describing the social milieu in which a cast of interesting characters act out their roles in ways that sometimes surprise us. She brings the historian’s in depth understanding of the period skillfully together with the hand of a master storyteller to weave a tale that is as intricate as the stitches sewn by the Jewish matriarchs who hold court in their sitting rooms.
    I received a free copy of Tempest for review, and while I found the prologue a bit long, once Astaire got revved up, it was worth the wait. Agatha Christie fans will identify with Astaire’s tone and style, but make no mistake – she’s no Christie clone – she’s in a class all her own.

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