The Temple and the Lodge

( 4 )

Overview

Coauthors of Holy Blood, Holy Grail Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh recount the events that led to the strange and sudden disappearance of the Knights Templar in the fourteenth century and their reappearance in the court of excommunicate Scottish king Robert the Bruce. Following the survival of certain unexpected Templar traditions, the authors document the evolution of a world-changing order through the birth of the Masonic lodge. They chart the history of Freemasonry through...

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Overview

Coauthors of Holy Blood, Holy Grail Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh recount the events that led to the strange and sudden disappearance of the Knights Templar in the fourteenth century and their reappearance in the court of excommunicate Scottish king Robert the Bruce. Following the survival of certain unexpected Templar traditions, the authors document the evolution of a world-changing order through the birth of the Masonic lodge. They chart the history of Freemasonry through its medieval roots and into the modern era.

The book posits that the order’s contribution to the fostering of tolerance, progressive values, and cohesion in English society aided in preempting a French-style revolution in England; that Freemasonry was an essential keystone in the formation of the United States; and that America itself is an embodiment of the ideal “Masonic Republic.” This groundbreaking thread of analysis challenges the accepted traditions of Western history as it is currently taught. What is the true source of our most valued traditions? Twenty years since its original publication, The Temple and the Lodge remains a trenchant and essential edition to any collection of Western history.

The origins of Freemasonry are explored in this book by the authors of the bestseller, Holy Blood, Holy Grail. The history of Freemasonry is charted from its mysterious beginnings in the fourteenth century through the currents of thought and political upheavals surrounding the organization in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Thirty-six black-and-white photographs are included in the book.

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Editorial Reviews

Toronto Star
Compelling…sane and informed…Written with gripping academic-detective style.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
George Washington, Ben Franklin and Edmund Randolph—all framers of the Constitution—were active Freemasons, as was John Marshall, first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. In this riveting and careful study, Baigent and Leigh (co-authors of Holy Blood, Holy Grail) suggest that Freemasonic lodges served America's Founding Fathers as a working model for our federal system. Freemasonry's doctrine of universal brotherhood and tolerance, they assert, had a liberalizing influence in England and France, in particular on Voltaire, Hume, Rousseau, Montesquieu as well as their disciples in what was to become the United States. Early, largely conjectural chapters link Freemasonry to remnants of the Knights Templar, a medieval society of European warrior-monks, some of whose members appear to have found refuge in Scotland. This jigsaw's pieces include Grail romances; the Scots Guard, personal bodyguard to the French king; Scottish freedom-fighter Robert Bruce; Rosicrucians; and the British Royal Society.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611450385
  • Publisher: Arcade Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/1/2011
  • Pages: 328
  • Sales rank: 956,936
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Baigent (along with Richard Leigh) is the bestselling author of Holy Blood, Holy Grail and The Temple and the Lodge, and of The Messianic Legacy. He was born in New Zealand in 1948. He graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from
Canterbury University, Christchurch, and a master of arts degree in mysticism and religious experience from the University of Kent, England. Since 1976 he has lived in England with his wife and children.

Richard Leigh was a novelist and short story writer born in New Jersey to a British father and an American mother. Leigh earned a BA from Tufts University, a master’s degree from the
University of Chicago, and a PhD from the State University of
New York at Stony Brook. He died in 2007.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2012

    This is an excellent book. There is much historical fact in it.

    This is an excellent book. There is much historical fact in it. Many writers have cribbed from it on this subject. The authors also speculate. But it can hardly be denied that fraternities influence the affairs of men. It even has some photos.

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  • Posted June 29, 2011

    Don't buy

    Not very well writen. Does not concern the subject. Too many negative works about the Templers. One loses interest when all it rells you is what is not there. Boring.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2006

    Pure Invention

    It is important to rember that this is not a work of researched history. It is a novel: utter fiction throughout, so there is no point in reading it if you are going to be irritated by rather facile and obvious confabulations. If, however, you fancy a conspiracy novel with a bit of wishful thinking thrown in - this is the book for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2005

    Decent Reading

    The book is basically 2 parts: attempting to link the Templar Knights with the 1st Freemasons and the American revolution. The author does well linking the Knights to the Freemasons with the limited knowledge available but the problem is their is lots of missing links in the process the author doesnt get to. The 2nd half is pretty good. Good historical information most of it is even believable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2003

    Loved it!

    I enjoyed this book very much, even though it was slow-going at times. The amount of information given is impressive and it flows nicely. If you are truly interested in the history of Freemasonry (written by non-masons), I suggest you try this. Also touches on the differences with MM degrees vs. 'extra' degrees (Scottish, York) and their origins. Dry at the beginning but worth it by the middle.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2003

    Ohhh, what could've been!

    This book can almost be neatly divided into two parts - the first half, which is full of Scottish names and Scottish places that I've never heard of and had absolutely no hope of keeping straight. Then there's the second half, which I found extremely interesting because it was about the American Revolution (something I'm pretty familiar with). Ultimately, though, the fault I have with this book is that it doesn't really do an effective job of linking the Knights Templar with Freemasonry. With the limited historical reference, it is impossible to do so, so why do they try? It was a valiant attempt, but just fell short in my mind.

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    Posted September 28, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2011

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