Ten Billion [NOOK Book]

Overview

A VINTAGE ORIGINAL

Just over two hundred years ago, there were one billion humans on Earth.

There are now over seven billion of us.

And, sometime this century, ...
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Ten Billion

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Overview

A VINTAGE ORIGINAL

Just over two hundred years ago, there were one billion humans on Earth.

There are now over seven billion of us.

And, sometime this century, the world population will reach at least ten billion.

Deforestation. Desertification. Species extinction. Global warming. Growing threats to food and water. The driving issues of our times are the result of one huge problem: Us.
 
As the population continues to grow, our problems will increase. And this means that every way we look at it, a planet of ten billion people is likely to be a nightmare.
 
Stephen Emmott, a scientist whose lab is at the forefront of research into complex natural systems, sounds the alarm. TEN BILLION is a snapshot of our planet, and our species, approaching a crisis, and a stark analysis of where this leaves us. TEN BILLION is not another climate book. TEN BILLION is a book about us.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

In the next hour of your life, nine thousand babies will be born. Humans are proliferating at an alarming rate: In 1960, there were "only" three billion of us; now there are seven. This population explosion not only strains our natural resources, especially food, energy, and water; it also heightens the devastating effects of climate change. In this trade paperback and NOOK original, scientist Stephen Emmott addresses the daunting implications of this looming population bomb.

Publishers Weekly
09/02/2013
This muscular but anxious broadside by Emmott, a Cambridge scientist, predicts a bleak future of critical shortages, droughts, starvation, and natural disasters once the Earth's population reaches the book's eponymous number. Whether it's water or food, population trends mean that present levels of consumption can't continue. The author is forceful, if frantic, in supplying the numbers. Forty percent of the planet is already devoted to agriculture, with governments and conglomerates in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia quickly gobbling up the remaining land. As the global population grows in number and wealth, the demand for food and resource-depleting consumer goods will rise. With a few hair-raising facts, Emmott deftly demonstrates that production is itself consumption: One liter of bottled water requires four liters to produce; a hamburger takes 800 gallons. Whereas technology helped forestall crises in the past, it now uses up the very resources it's designed to preserve. Water desalination, for instance, requires energy intensive and releases many pollutants. Nuclear power would offer short-term hope but remains unpopular. The author sees only "radical behavior change" as a viable solution but does not say how this would work. Emmott's facts are enough to shake steely optimists, though the book's Malthusian pathos could be a bit cloying even for like-minded pessimists. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
“A rallying call to arms. . . . Succinct and righteously pessimistic. . . . [with] an indispensible message to galvanize a world in potential crisis.”
    —Kirkus Reviews
 

Praise from the U.K. for TEN BILLION

“The cumulative effect of [Emmott’s] uncluttered, unadorned prose, buttressed with graphs and illustrations, is significant. . . . A spine-chilling warning of the environmental disaster that awaits the Earth.”
    —The Daily Telegraph (4 stars)
 
“Powerful. . . . Compelling. . . . The shift in thinking that will be needed if we are to prepare ourselves for living in a different world begins with reading Emmott's indispensable book.”
    —The Guardian 
 
"A stark, simple and short warning about the coming catastrophe, which [Emmott] feels is inevitable, resulting from human overpopulation and over-exploitation of the world’s resources. . . . A valuable contribution to rekindling a discussion on global population that has waxed and waned in the two centuries since Thomas Robert Malthus first brought the issue to public attention."
      —Financial Times

Acclaim for the theater production of TEN BILLION, performed by Stephen Emmott at London's Royal Court Theatre:

"This an hour of Matrix moments, of reminders of what underlies our daily lives. It's freeing to face the facts as well as alarming. . . . It informs, unsettles, provokes. Job done." —The Times (London)

"Professor Emmott argues his case with an implacable logic. He is quiet, humane and deeply concerned and when he says . . . 'I think we're fucked,' you have to believe him." —The Guardian (London)

"A new kind of talk . . . a daring one-man show in which Emmott desperately strives to pull together into one grand and devastating portrait the many ways we are impacting the planet." —New Scientist

Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-01
A rallying call to arms on the deteriorating state of our overcrowded planet. British environmental expert Emmott, current chief of Microsoft Research's Computational Science Laboratory in Cambridge, presents a succinct and righteously pessimistic manifesto on the human race's impact on planet Earth. Channeling his inner Al Gore, the author forewarns of the issues of an increasing global population rate (currently at 7 billion and counting) as it gains momentum and causes the expanding degradation of the planet's intricate ecosystemic network. Disturbing the harmonious interdependent synergies of the Earth's atmosphere may bring about what Emmott calls an "unprecedented planetary emergency." The dire consequences of overpopulation are all around us, writes the author, and he delivers a laundry list of human offenses: increasing demand for fresh water could lead to the resource's eventual scarcity; mushrooming levels of greenhouse gasses produced from industrial production alter the Earth's climate and weather patterns; mounting food and fuel demands increase pollution; melting ice caps contribute to rising sea levels; and land misuse is causing the "mass extinction" of species. Emmott directly blames humans for these disasters, since "our cleverness, our inventiveness, and our activities are now the drivers of every global problem we face," from methane gas plumes to global warming to deforestation. With charts and photographs and a stark few-sentences-per-page layout, the author further illustrates the catastrophes at our doorsteps with sufficient urgency. He also offers several possible solutions. A "technologizing" approach incorporating nuclear power, "geoenergy" and desalination efforts is one, along with a radical, universal behavioral change that replaces overconsumption with hyperconservation. Both, however, pale in comparison to Emmott's hopelessly resigned final thought on the final page: "I THINK WE'RE FUCKED." Shocking facts and an indispensable message to galvanize a world in potential crisis.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345806468
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/10/2013
  • Series: Vintage
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 288,216
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Stephen Emmott is head of Computational Science at Microsoft Research. He leads a broad scientific research program, at the center of which is an interdisciplinary team of new kinds of scientists, and a new kind of laboratory, in Cambridge, England, pioneering new approaches to tackle fundamental problems in science. His lab’s research spans from molecular biology, immunology, and neuroscience, to plant biology, climatology, biogeochemistry, terrestrial and marine ecology, and conversation biology, as well as the new fields of programming life and artificial photosynthesis. Stephen is also Visiting Professor of Computational Science, University of Oxford; Visiting Professor of Biological Computation, University College London; and Distinguished Fellow of the UK National Endowment of Science, Technology and the Arts.
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Read an Excerpt

This is a book about us.
 
It’s a book about you, your children, your parents, your friends. It’s about every one of us. It’s about our failure: failure as individuals, the failure of business, and the failure of our politicians.
 
It’s about the unprecedented planetary emergency we’ve created.
 
It’s about the future of us.
 
Earth is home to millions of species.
 
Just one dominates it. Us.
 
Our cleverness, our inventiveness, and our activities have modified almost every part of our planet. In fact, we are having a profound impact on it.
 
Indeed, our cleverness, our inventiveness, and our activities are now the drivers of every global problem we face.
 
And every one of these problems is accelerating as we continue to grow toward a population of ten billion.
 
In fact, I believe we can rightly call the situation we’re in right now an emergency—an unprecedented planetary emergency.
 
This is the reason I have written this book.
 
I am a scientist.
 
I lead a lab, in Cambridge, England, which is home to a unique collection of amazing young scientists. We conduct research into complex systems, including the climate system and ecosystems, as well as the impact of us humans on the earth.
 
Science is ultimately about understanding. And this is what we try to do: to understand the earth’s climate, and the behavior of the earth’s terrestrial and marine ecosystems—from its microbial communities to its forests—and to predict how these vital planetary systems will respond to change.
 
Change caused by us.
 
We humans emerged as a species about 200,000 years ago. In geological time, that is really incredibly recent.
 
Just over 10,000 years ago, there were one million of us.
 
By 1800, just over two hundred years ago, there were one billion of us.
 
By 1960, fifty years ago, there were three billion of us.
 
There are now over seven billion of us.
 
By 2050, your children, or your children’s children, will be living on a planet with at least nine billion other people.
 
Sometime toward the end of this century, there will be at least ten billion of us. Possibly more.
 
 

How did we get to where we are now?
 
We got to where we are now through a number of civilization- and society-shaping “events”; most notably, the agricultural revolution, the scientific revolution, and—in the West—the public-health revolution.
 
These events have fundamentally shaped how we live, and have fundamentally shaped our planet. Their legacy will continue to shape our future. So we need to look at our growth and activities through the lens of these developments.
 


By 1800 the global population had reached one billion.
 
One of the principal reasons for this growth was the invention of agriculture. The “agricultural revolution” enabled us to go from being hunter-gatherers to highly organized producers of food, and allowed our population to grow.
 
A useful way to think of the development and importance of agriculture is in terms of at least three agricultural “revolutions.” The first took place over 10,000 years ago. This was the domestication of animals and the cultivation of plant types.
 
The second agricultural revolution was between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. This was a revolution in agricultural productivity and the mechanization of food production.
 
The third happened between the 1950s and 2000s; the so-called “green revolution.”
 
But there’s another story here: the start of a fundamental transformation—of land use—by humans.
 


One hundred and thirty years later, we had grown to two billion.
 
It was 1930. The impact of another revolution—the industrial revolution—was being felt. The world was being transformed by manufacturing, technological innovation, new industrial processes, and transportation.
 
The continuing expansion of agriculture and the revolution in public health enabled us to continue to grow—rapidly.
 
But there’s another story here too: the start of our lethal addiction to coal, oil, and gas as our principal sources of energy.
 


Thirty years later, we had grown to three billion.
 
It was 1960, and we were in the middle of a food revolution. There were more of us. Far more of us. We needed more food. Far more food. More than the established agricultural system could provide.
 
What became known as the green revolution provided this extra food.
 
It did so through:
 
The industrial-scale use of chemical pesticides, chemical herbicides, and chemical fertilizers;
 
an unprecedented expansion of land use;
 
and the wholesale industrialization of the entire food production system. This included the industrialization of raising and harvesting animals for food, from the rise of industrial-scale “factory fishing” fleets to battery farming of pigs, poultry, and beef.
 
This revolution came at a huge cost to the environment, in terms of:
 
 
loss of habitat;
pollution;
overfishing.
 
 
It also set in motion an unprecedented decline of species and the start of the degradation of entire ecosystems.
 
 

By 1980, twenty years later, there were four billion of us on the planet.
 
The green revolution had produced much more food. That made food cheaper.
In turn, that meant we had more money to spend. And we had started to spend it on “stuff”: televisions, video recorders, Walkmans, hair dryers, cars, and clothes. And we also started to spend it on vacations. Far more vacations.
 
At the center of this spending spree was the astonishing growth of transportation.
 
In 1960 there were 100 million cars on the world’s roads—by 1980 there were 300 million.
 
With this came a massive expansion of road net- works—carving up entire countries, further increasing loss of habitat for other species.
 
In 1960 we flew 62 billion passenger miles. In 1980 we flew 620 billion passenger miles.
Global shipping grew at a similarly astonishing rate. All of the stuff we were buying, plus all of the food we were consuming, plus all the raw materials and resources required to make everything was being shipped around the world.
 

 
Just ten years later, in 1990, there were five billion of us.
 
By this point, initial signs of the consequences of our growth were starting to show.
Not the least of these was on water.
 
Our demand for water—not just the water we drank, but the water we needed for food production and to make all the stuff we were consuming— was going through the roof.
 
But something was starting to happen to water. Back in 1984, journalists reported from Ethiopia about a famine of biblical proportions caused by widespread drought.
 
That, it seemed, was “over there,” in Africa. Except that it wasn’t just happening “over there,” in Africa. Unusual drought, and unusual flooding, was increasing everywhere: Australia, Asia, Europe, the United States.
 
Water, a vital resource we had thought of as abundant, was now suddenly something that had the potential to be scarce.
 


By the year 2000, there were six billion of us.
 
By this point it was becoming clear to the world’s scientific community that the accumulation of CO2, methane, and other green- house gases in the atmosphere—as a result of agriculture, land use, and the production, processing, and transportation of everything we were consuming—was changing the climate. And that, as a result, we had a serious problem on our hands.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2013

    I was initially intrigued by this book's free sample, because I'

    I was initially intrigued by this book's free sample, because I'm very concerned about what has been happening to our planet. One of my fave books that got me into this topic is "$25 a gallon" and "Just in Case." So imagine my disappointment for paying $8 for someone's incomplete book report!! That's what this book feels like. From here on out, I will not refer to this as a book --- it is more brochure or pamphlet. It took longer for me to read the blurb on the author, on this website, than it did for me to compete his concise observations. Save your money and read an article in a magazine regarding this topic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2013

    The blurb would be more appealing if it included a hint of how t

    The blurb would be more appealing if it included a hint of how the author address the classic argument that innovation will solve the problems of growing population, that Malthus is wrong, over and over, always.
    Please ignore my rating, which was required by the software.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2014

    A

    Global warming is a political hoax aimed at.controlling everything we do. The EPA is overbearing and out of control.
    Be a good steward of the planet, but don't buy into the fear mongering environmentalists agenda.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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