Ten Little Rabbits

( 3 )

Overview

"Hurray! At long last primary school educators and lovers of children's literature have an accurate Native American book written for primary children".--The Five Owls. An IRA Children's Book Award winner. Parents' "Best Book of the Year". American Bookseller "Pick of the Lists". Full-color illustrations.

"Hurray! At long last primary school educators and lovers of children's literature have an accurate Native American book written for primary children."--The Five Owls. An IRA Children's Book Award winner. Parents' "Best Book of the

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Overview

"Hurray! At long last primary school educators and lovers of children's literature have an accurate Native American book written for primary children".--The Five Owls. An IRA Children's Book Award winner. Parents' "Best Book of the Year". American Bookseller "Pick of the Lists". Full-color illustrations.

"Hurray! At long last primary school educators and lovers of children's literature have an accurate Native American book written for primary children."--The Five Owls. An IRA Children's Book Award winner. Parents' "Best Book of the Year." American Bookseller "Pick of the Lists." Full-color illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
There is a great deal of information and entertainment packed into this unusual counting book, which opens with ``One lonely traveler riding on the plain.'' The strikingly detailed accompanying illustration authentically portrays a Native American riding on a dog-pulled travois. The fact that the Native American is a rabbit is the only note of fantasy, which creates an unusual--and effective--balance between the real and the imaginary. In each subsequent spread, an additional rabbit appears, and the expanding group is seen engaged in such activities as rain-dancing, sending smoke signals, hunting, storytelling, running from a storm, fishing and pounding on a drum. Although Long provides vibrant, earth-toned captivating artwork, some of these concepts and activities may be a bit beyond the book's intended audience. As a bonus for older readers, the book's closing pages provide notes on how specific tribes executed the traditions mentioned in the text. Ages 3-8. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
A counting book with a Native American flavor introduces the numbers from one to ten. The beautifully detailed watercolors portray rabbits in dress and activities typical of Native American tribes. Events depicted include a corn dance of the Tewa, storytelling by the Blackfoot, weaving by the Navajo, and the like. Information relating to the scenes is located in the endnotes. Excellent accompaniment to any multicultural program.
Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin
Ms. Grossman and Ms. Long's Ten Little Native American Rabbits belongs in every child's just-before- nap or bed-time library. Virginia Grossman's simple rhyming couplets roll lightly from the lips, Ms. Long's serene paintings are enchanting to the eye, and together they create an ambiance that totally relaxes by the time "Ten sleepy weavers know...day is done." The costumes and customs of the ten tribes represented in the exquisite illustrations are described on the final pages.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-- Not a book about numbers, but a quiet, respectful survey of some Native American customs organized through the structure of a counting rhyme, populated by rabbits dressed in traditional garb, from ``one lonely traveler riding on the plain'' to ``ten sleepy weavers knowing day is done.'' Notes at the back identify each tribe represented (Plains, Pueblo, Great Lakes, Northwestern, and Southwestern peoples), and provide information about the pictures. The rabbits have an earnest charm reminiscent of Marjorie Flack's industrious family in Heyward's The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes (Houghton, 1974). In double-page spreads adopting the muted colors of the Earth's own dyes, the rabbits play out their tableaux against ample natural vistas that are undisturbed by power lines, asphalt, fences, or the like. Informative pictures invite group sharing, while the gentle mood suits bedtime as well. --Karen Litton, London Public Libraries, Ontario, Canada
From the Publisher
Informative pictures invite group sharing, while the gentle mood suits bedtime. School Library Journal

Best Book of the Year RA Children's Book Award, Parents

FIVE OWLS, March/April 1991
Hurray! At long last primary school educators and lovers of children's literature have an accurate American Indian book written for primary children. The author and illustrator have made Ten Little Rabbits into ten little Indian characters, and this book is a valuable replacement for the old, stereotypical ten little Indians rhyme. The rabbits are not playing Indian but are Indian people with the gentleness, affection, and skills of the ancient ones. In many authentic American Indian stories, animals are able to humanize and are interchangeable with people. Often the main chararcter takes rabbit characteristics while remaining truly Indian and having human-style experiences.

The book begins with one lonely traveler on a travois, followed by two graceful Tewa corn dancers on the next page, and, on the page following, three smoke signalers against a vast expanse of plains. Then, with a bit of humor, four clever trackers look for clues, their tiny size accentuated in comparison with the bear track they find. Five storytellers take readers into the chill of winter as they huddle around the campfire trying to keep warm. Clearly these are not the same rabbits from page to page—each page portrays a different tribe. Additional information about each tribe and the activities portrayed in the pictures is included in the back of the book.

Worries about storms and scenes of childish play intertwine with rich cultural facts. These busy little rabbits depict a well-rounded lifestyle of very human activities. The Kwakiutl animal masks and cedar bark robes and brightly colored Navajo rugs make this book a delightful visual treat. The story's ending, as sleepy little rabbits fall asleep in their traditional Dakota homes, exudes warmth and comfort.

Writer Virginia Grossman and artist Sylvia Long, a Dakota Indian, have created this book with honestly and careful attention to authenticity and beauty, and the result is a high-quality combination of rhyme, culture, and artistic expression that will please children.

BOOKLIST, April 1991
Grossman interprets the cultures of various American Indian tribes through a counting book in which the characters are rabbits dressed as Indians. Though this may sound a bit precious, it's not: the gravity of the characters' demeanor precludes any silliness here. Earth tones predominate in ink-and-watercolor artwork that stretches across wide, double-page spreads. The illustrations are interpreted in brief rhymed couplets (one line per spread): "One lonely traveler riding on the plain./ Two graceful dancers asking for some rain." A key to the pictures, found at the end of the book, explains how each relates to the customs or artifacts of a particular tribe. Bits about the tribes may be helpful, but the information given is minimal. Preschool and kindergarten teachers looking for picture books that cut across the curriculum will find this a good way to combine a unit on native Americans with counting practice.

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, Best Books of 1991, November 1991
With striking earth tones, this ingenious counting book blends reality and fantasy in its portrayal of a group of Native Americans—bunnies all—engaged in characteristic activities.

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, June 1991
Not a book about numbers, but a quiet, respectful survey of some Native American customs organized through the structure of a counting rhyme, populated by rabbits dressed in traditional garb, from "one lonely traveler riding on the plain" to "ten sleepy weavers knowing day is done." Notes at the back identify each tribe represented (Plains, Pueblo, Great Lakes, Northwestern, and Southwestern peoples), and provide information about the pictures. The rabbits have an earnest charm reminiscent of Marjorie Flack's industrious family

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780811810579
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC
  • Publication date: 3/1/1995
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 448,555
  • Age range: 1 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.75 (w) x 8.87 (h) x 0.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Virginia Grossman is a resident of Washington State. Ten Little Rabbits is her first children's book.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 2, 2009

    Wonderful children's book to read over and over again

    We received this book as a gift and have given it several times for newborns or first birthdays. It has delightful Native American-style illustrations and is a very short easy to read rhyming book which is perfect for bedtime. My children both loved it and I enjoyed reading it to them over and over again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2002

    Fantastic!

    Gorgeous and unique counting book for even the littlest children. This was given to my daughters as a gift and is my new favorite of their books- you'll be giving this to everyone you know!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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