The Ten Offenses: Reclaim the Blessings of God's Eternal Truth

The Ten Offenses: Reclaim the Blessings of God's Eternal Truth

by Pat Robertson
     
 

The Ten Commandments are a gift from God, intended to protect and bless His people. Yet there is so much confusion and misunderstanding regarding these ten timeless truths. How could something so good be so offensive? In this book, Pat Robertson takes a fresh, penetrating look at the benefits of honoring the Ten Commandments--both personally and as a nation.  See more details below

Overview

The Ten Commandments are a gift from God, intended to protect and bless His people. Yet there is so much confusion and misunderstanding regarding these ten timeless truths. How could something so good be so offensive? In this book, Pat Robertson takes a fresh, penetrating look at the benefits of honoring the Ten Commandments--both personally and as a nation.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Pat Robertson. Integrity, $18.99 (226p) ISBN 1-59145-126-4 Incendiary and one-sided, this jeremiad by Robertson, founder of Regent University and The Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN), will further polarize the national debate on moral issues. Robertson claims that our society is rapidly deteriorating because of "the antireligious vendetta that the forces of militant secularism have urged for decades upon the Supreme Court," and he prescribes a national embrace of the Bible's 10 commandments as a cure. Students of history will find the book rife with errors. John Adams who was in London when the Constitution was drafted and first read its provisions weeks after the framers had completed their task is credited as that document's "chief architect." And in a section on the "Jewish backlash" to anti-Semitism, Robertson suggests that both the Anti-Defamation League and the American Jewish Congress were created after the Holocaust, their founders having decided that "the future safety of American Jews would exist only if secularism replaced Christianity in the public arena." (The organizations date to 1913 and 1918, respectively.) The book's last chapters, which dissect each of the commandments individually, are stronger and more focused than the opening overview chapters. Robertson argues effectively that our nation's violations of the eighth commandment (stealing) should include Napster downloads, loan defaults, grade inflation at elite universities, journalistic chicanery and identity theft. But Robertson's solution to such ills lies not in emphasizing America as a nation with an enduring Christian heritage, but in claiming that the Founders desired America to be a Christian state. Thomas Jefferson would surely roll in his grave. (Jan. 27) Forecast: Despite its many inaccuracies and poor research, this book will likely be a national bestseller, with a substantial print run of 300,000 copies and major media exposure particularly since it will be released the day the 2004 presidential election kicks off in earnest with the New Hampshire primary.n Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781591451266
Publisher:
Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
Publication date:
01/27/2004
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.18(w) x 8.54(h) x 0.73(d)

Meet the Author

PAT ROBERTSON is the founder and chairman of the Christian Broadcasting Network, Inc., founder of Regent University, The Center for Law and Justice, and International Family Entertainment, Inc. Robertson is the author of ten books including The Turning Tide, The New Millennium, and The End of the Age. His New York Times bestseller, The New World Order, was the number one religious book in America in the year of its publication, as were The Secret Kingdom and Answers to 100 of Life's Most Probing Questions. Robertson was named among America's 100 Cultural Elite by Time magazine. He and wife, Dede, have four children and thirteen grandchildren. They reside in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

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