Ten Rosy Roses

Ten Rosy Roses

by Eve Merriam, Julia Gorton
     
 

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Ten rosy roses standing in a line,
Jan picks one and now there are nine. . . .

In this colorful counting game, ten rosy roses disappear before our eyes and one happy schoolteacher gets a big surprise. Roses couldn't be rosier than they are in Julia Gorton's warm, bright illustrations, where all the charming pickers have distinct smiles and personalities.

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Overview

Ten rosy roses standing in a line,
Jan picks one and now there are nine. . . .

In this colorful counting game, ten rosy roses disappear before our eyes and one happy schoolteacher gets a big surprise. Roses couldn't be rosier than they are in Julia Gorton's warm, bright illustrations, where all the charming pickers have distinct smiles and personalities. Eve Merriam's verse tells the story of this cozy rose garden in fourteen lines that will have children everywhere counting down from ten to zero at the drop of a petal.

Author Biography: Eve Merriam is one of the most anthologized poets in the United States today. She wrote more than fifty books for adults and children, and she won the Yale Younger Poets Prize and the National Council of Teachers of English Award for excellence in children's poetry. She died in 1992, but her poetry lives on in several beloved collections.

Eve Merriam was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the youngest child of Russian-born parents who owned a chain of women's dress shops. Books and reading were an important part of her growing-up years, and the written word captivated her from a very young age. Eve Merriam found several avenues of expression as a writer, most notably as a poet and playwright. She wrote close to fifty books of prose and poetry for both adults and children, including Rainbow Writing, Mommies at Work, and The Inner City Mother Goose. The last was adapted into the Broadway musical Inner City, and Ms. Merriam's own career as a playwright included an Obie award for The Club.

Eve Merriam is one of the most anthologized poets in the United States today, and she won the YaleYounger Poets Prize and the National Council of Teachers of English Award for excellence in children's poetry. She died in 1992, but her poetry lives on in several beloved collections.

She once described the origins of her joy in poetry. "Growing up, my brother and I were taken to Gilbert and Sullivan, and we used to chant all those tongue-twisting verses of Gilbert's. The local column of the Philadelphia Bulletin used to print light verse, and my brother and I would read aloud great, declaiming things like 'Gunga Din' or 'The Highwayman.'

"I started to write when I was quite young. I was writing poems when I was about seven or eight. By the time I got into high school I was writing serious poems for the high school magazine, as well as political and light verse for the weekly newspaper at school. It never occurred to me that someday I might like to be a writer. I just wrote. I think one is chosen to be a poet. You write poems because you must write them, because you can't live your life without writing them.

"I've sometimes spent weeks looking for precisely the right word. It's like having a tiny marble in your pocket; you can just feel it. Sometimes you find a word and say, 'No, I don't think this is it. Then you discard it and take another and another until you get it right. I do think poetry is great fun. That's what I'd like to stress more than anything else: the joy of the sounds of language. "

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-KBright, graphically clean paintings illustrate Merriams counting rhyme. Each event (Seven rosy roses by the wall of bricks,/Pam picks one and now there are six) is accompanied by a double-page spread detailing the fate of one of the flowers at the hands of one of 10 children. The last spread shows the youngsters presenting a bouquet to their teacher on the first day of school. The crisp, clear design matches the master poets wordplay. A book to pick and share.Kathleen Whalin, Greenwich Country Day School, CT Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Hot pink and lipstick red swirls on the endpapers set the tone for this eye-catching counting book. Drawn in by colors that leap from the page and boldly printed, chant-along couplets, readers join ten young students as they collect a flower each for their teacher's bouquet: "Ten rosy roses standing in a line,/Jan picks one and now there are nine." In an unexpected finish, twins pick the last roses, taking the count from two to "none." A dramatic use of close-up perspectives makes the children appear huge; in some cases, they spill over the tops of the page. The illustrations have a retro feel to them that charmingly highlights every character's unique physical appearance. Readers will delight in the antics of a bright yellow butterfly that joins the class on the eighth rose and remains on hand until the bouquet is presented to Ms. Jones. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060278878
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/28/1999
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
(w) x (h) x 0.32(d)
Lexile:
AD720L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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