Ten Things I Love About You

Ten Things I Love About You

by Daniel Kirk
     
 

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Fans of Mo Willems' Elephant and Piggie will enjoy Rabbit and Pig’s clever back-and-forth which shows the funny ways friends bounce ideas and feelings off each other.

Rabbit just adores his friend Pig. So he is excited to make a list of all the things he loves about Pig. And who better to help him write the list than Pig himself? But Pig is busy, and keeps

Overview

Fans of Mo Willems' Elephant and Piggie will enjoy Rabbit and Pig’s clever back-and-forth which shows the funny ways friends bounce ideas and feelings off each other.

Rabbit just adores his friend Pig. So he is excited to make a list of all the things he loves about Pig. And who better to help him write the list than Pig himself? But Pig is busy, and keeps sending Rabbit away. But no matter what Pig does, Rabbit is inspired to add another thing to his list. When Pig says, “Rabbit, I'm starting to lose my patience!” Rabbit has #6—“I love Pig because he’s not afraid to show his feelings!” Fortunately, Pig’s dwindling patience is rewarded when Rabbit completes his list—and the two realize exactly why they are such good pals.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Pamela Paul
A charmingly illustrated book about self-expression, sharing, cooperation, gratitude—what's not to love?
Publishers Weekly
Kirk borrows from the comic rhythms of Abbott and Costello (or is it Burns and Allen?) in his funny tribute to friendship. Pig is sitting thoughtfully at his desk when Rabbit stops by to announce that he's making a list of "ten things I love about you." This is all well and good ("Wow, ten!" says Pig), except that Rabbit is a wee bit obsessive about it. Everything Pig says or does becomes fodder for the list, including his growing frustration with Rabbit's relentlessness. "I'm starting to lose my patience!" immediately inspires entry "Number 6—I love Pig because he's not afraid to show his feelings." Kirk (the Library Mouse series) pulls a sweet switcheroo in the final pages of his story—Pig turns out to have list-making ambitions of his own—but not before readers will be chuckling at how two like-minded souls can find themselves at cross-purposes. Kirk's visual style is a departure of sorts: instead of his customary sculptural renderings, his digitally colored drawings, painted on plywood and outlined in scraggly ink, give the proceedings a warm, handcrafted feel. Ages 5–8. (Dec.)
The New York Times Book Review
“A charmingly illustrated book about self-expression, sharing, cooperation, gratitude—what’s not to love?”
The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
“The devoted Rabbit’s clueless annoying of his friend is deadpan funny. . . . The textured look of the painted wood panels has visual appeal. . . . May inspire kids to take a keener look at the charms of their own buddies. . . . A useful starting point for a classroom or family project of listing a friend’s or family member’s good points.”
From the Publisher
* “Rabbit and Pig join the ranks of duos that grapple with the intricacies of friendship—and impressively stand out. . . . Kirk gets the comic timing just right. . . . Although great for reading aloud, put this at the top of the list for using as a springboard for creative writing or a discussion starter about what qualities make a good friend.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“A charmingly illustrated book about self-expression, sharing, cooperation, gratitude—what’s not to love?” — The New York Times Book Review

“The devoted Rabbit’s clueless annoying of his friend is deadpan funny. . . . The textured look of the painted wood panels has visual appeal. . . . May inspire kids to take a keener look at the charms of their own buddies. . . . A useful starting point for a classroom or family project of listing a friend’s or family member’s good points.” — The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

“A sweet book about friendship and having a positive outlook. . . . The positive twists are refreshing–there are two ways to interpret Pig’s impatience, and Rabbit unfailingly looks on the bright side. . . . Kirk’s illustrations perfectly capture Rabbit’s always cheerful nature and Pig’s growing irritation. . . . Ideal for group sharing. . . . Provides a framework for looking for admirable traits in classmates and feeling acknowledged by others and would be a good choice to prompt discussions, suggesting that students find positive things to say about one another.” — School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
Rabbit is so excited about his friendship with Pig that he wants to make a list of all of Pig's attributes and he cannot wait to share it with him. Unfortunately for Rabbit he gets stuck after reason number one. Pig encourages him to go home and think about what else he wants to add. It is obvious that Pig is busy and Rabbit's constant interruptions are a source of annoyance. When Pig cries out in exasperation that he is losing his patience, Rabbit calmly writes, "I love Pig because he's not afraid to show his feelings." In the end Rabbit has a list of 10 positive characteristics of his friend and delights in the fact that Pig has been composing his own list of Rabbit's finest qualities. The often humorous repartee between these two friends not only is clever but clearly emphasizes just why Rabbit and Pig are ideal friends. Rabbit is persistent and not to be deterred. While Pig, for the most part, remains unflappable and encouraging. This is a clever take on the popular theme of friendship and sharing feelings. The warm and lively illustrations, painted on plywood add a cozy, homey tone to the story. With the text written in two colors that delineate the speakers the story become an excellent choice for a Reader's Theater or a play for two voices. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1—A sweet book about friendship and having a positive outlook. Rabbit decides to make a list of the 10 things he likes best about his friend, Pig. Pig is a little impatient with Rabbit's frequent interruptions to show him his progress, but each little annoyance from Pig becomes a positive thing for Rabbit to add to his list. When Rabbit rings Pig's bell to ask for his help with the list, Pig replies, "This is your list, Rabbit. Only you know what to say." This sentiment is reflected in item #3 on the list: "I love Pig because he believes in me." The positive twists are refreshing-there are two ways to interpret Pig's impatience, and Rabbit unfailingly looks on the bright side. The book ends with Rabbit discovering why Pig has been so busy-he has been writing his own list of reasons why he likes Rabbit. Kirk's illustrations perfectly capture Rabbit's always cheerful nature and Pig's growing irritation. Large, simple figures on uncluttered backgrounds make this title ideal for group sharing. The story provides a framework for looking for admirable traits in classmates and feeling acknowledged by others and would be a good choice to prompt discussions, suggesting that students find positive things to say about one another.—Mary Hazelton, formerly at Warren & Waldoboro Elementary Schools, ME

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399252884
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
12/27/2012
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
605,453
Product dimensions:
8.42(w) x 10.18(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Daniel Kirk (www.danielkirk.com) has written and illustrated numerous popular picture books, including Keisha Ann Can and Library Mouse. He lives in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. 

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